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I'm sending a letter to the teacher.

 
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  #1  
Old 04-12-2007, 04:50 PM
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I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

My son (3rd grader) brought home a paper called "Why do bears attack campgrounds?" The first couple paragraphs were fairly accurate in describing the problem with campers leaving food out and whatnot in larger parks.

This however was the last paragraph:

"The black bears are in danger of becoming extinct. Each year more of their wilderness homes are destroyed. Some hunters kill more than the law allows. In the 1930's grizzly bears dissappeared. Unless people are more careful, the black bears will also be gone one day." (italics mine)

Anyone want to load me up with some numbers and other info to put in the letter that will return to the class with this homework?
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Old 04-12-2007, 05:26 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

sadly I have found that alot of teachers dont hunt. These somehow happen to be the ones that think they are perfect and you are just a teenager that thinks he knows it all instead of thinking on it first. The few times in my life that I was able to prove those techers wrong were some of the sweetest memories of my life. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
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Old 04-12-2007, 06:13 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

In Oregon we have 30,000 bears in 40,000 square miles! Danger of becoming extinct? Ha!
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Old 04-12-2007, 06:49 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

black bears extinct, ha ha ha yah freaking right.

Look at british columbia, they got so many bears its unbelievable.

As was said about Oregon, we have no shortage of them either, as well as Washington...
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  #5  
Old 04-12-2007, 07:16 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

Any websites with facts I can print out. Fish and Game type info? I'm going to be out of the house most of the rest of the evening and the homework is due tomorrow.
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:51 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

How do you think the teacher will like these apples? <font color="blue"> </font>

From the following link:
http://www.bearsinbc.com/pages/01bla...opulation.html

British Columbia's black bear population is currently at an historic high. The Wildlife Branch estimates that 120,000 to 160,000 black bears live in British Columbia, having increased from around 80,000 in 1870. (Demarchi 1999). This is nearly 30% of the 443,000 black bears in the Canadian population and approximately 15% of the 803,000 black bears in the North American population (Samuel and Jackson 2000).



The greater ability of black bears to adapt to human activities compared to that of grizzly bears has contributed to their success. Black bears have been trapped and hunted continuously by non-natives for nearly 200 years and by First Nations peoples for uncounted generations, yet populations persist in most areas. Black bears in some parts of the province may experience loss of forage as second-growth forests shade out berry producing plants and as large logs, root boles and stumps are lost for denning. These factors may lead to increased cannibalism and some localized population declines (Davis and Harestad 1996)


STATUS OF BLACK BEARS

North America

Black bears are the most common large carnivore in North America. At a recent black bear workshop for the U.S. and Canada, scientists concluded that black bears are long lived (20+ years), adaptable, highly mobile and more productive than previously thought. The current range of black bears includes all of the Canadian provinces and territories except Prince Edward Island, most of the continental United States in the less-settled forested regions and the northwestern mountains of Mexico.

Historically, black bears occupied most of North America except the treeless barrens of northern Canada and the desert regions of the southwestern United States and Mexico (Seton 1929). In Canada, black bears occupy 85% of their historic range (Kolenosky and Strathearn 1987). They have been displaced from the southern farmlands of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. In the United States, black bears have lost habitat wherever hardwood forests have been eliminated.


British Columbia

Black bears are Yellow-listed in BC, which means they are neither endangered nor vulnerable (see the risk category table below).* They are, however, classified as a "look-alike" species and are listed in Appendix II of the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES), to which British Columbia is a signatory. They are listed because individual black bears are highly variable in size and colour and some black bears are similar in appearance to some threatened or endangered species of world bears, such as the Malaysian sun bear. British Columbia and Ontario have the largest populations of black bears of all the provinces. In British Columbia, black bears are found throughout the province. They are the only large mammal in the province that occupies every ecosection.

* The Glacier or blue bear of Tatshenshini-Alsek Provincial Park has been placed on the Blue List, which contains species that are considered vulnerable or sensitive to human activities or natural events, or are species for which information is too limited to allow designation in another category (Harper 1994).

Ah yeah, I love socking it to a bunny hugging teacher!!! ~JT
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  #7  
Old 04-12-2007, 08:14 PM
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Re: I\'m sending a letter to the teacher.

I live in Black Bear Country. Each year our licenses give us Bear, Deer, and turkey tags. Most hunters only use the deer. Probably less than 1/2 use the turkey and I'd be shocked if 20% use the bear tag.

I cant stand when people talk crap about things they nothing about. They should witness an animal hit by a car that lays there in agony suffering a slow death while the turkey vultures start picking at it while it is still alive.
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