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Diesel Truck for hunting

 
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  #50  
Old 02-22-2004, 08:19 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Livonia, MI
Posts: 108
Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

The new 6.0L from ford is a nice engine. Quieter than the old 7.3L and a little peppier. The biggest improvement was the 5 spd automatic with trailer tow mode. Not as good as the Chevy Allison trans but a huge improvement over the old 4R100 automatic. If anyone is looking for a used diesel I am selling mine in June. I have to make one more trip to a car show in Niagra Falls with the trailer. Then she will be up for sale.

Matt
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  #51  
Old 02-23-2004, 12:24 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Palmer, Alaska
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Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

DC,
I have a black '79 F100 Ranger XLT 4x4 short box with a '69 Chevy 4 bolt 454/Turbo 400 under the hood with 35's and a 4" lift. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] I'm a lot lighter than the Diesels, and none of 'em can go where I go, or as fast. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img] About 450hp and 500ft lbs the way I built it with the ported 049 heads.

It'll run twin turbos that I have off of the '88 T-Bird Turbo Coupes 2.3L Turbo when I'm all done. The Dana 60's are going under it before that though.

I read that the factory engine braking on the F350 was far superior to the Allison, and Dodge has none at all. I think the test was with a 7000 lb. load up and down an unspecified grade in which the F350 with the 6.0L pulled 70 MPH the whole way up. The other two were redlining upon downshift to hold 70, and had to hold 60 in higher gear and deal with it.

The Chevy rode the best, but had horrible ground clearance, I think they said. Dodge was the worst of the three there I think.

Downhill, the F350 took top honers for speed control by the retarder. The other was not nearly as effective and brakes were a must. The other doesn't have a retarder period.

DC Posted -
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR> Your teacher was correct , "if" the engine was gas and had high compression like gas engines do, heating wouldn't be needed in cold temps.
With the flash point being higher in diesel fuel and many times lower compression then a gas engine has, the preheaters and glow plugs are needed to get them started.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

A gas engine will usually run between 7.5:1 and 9.5:1 compression, and rarely to 10 or 10.5:1 because of detonation. No diesel I know of runs lower than a gas engine. I'm affraid you're confussed and have them switched around there. A diesel will run up over 40:1 compression where no gas engine ever will approach. Some Top Fuel drag cars are pushing to 20:1, with most in the mid to high teens is all. They don't run gas though. Aluminum heads, Nitro and MANY other things are used and done to avoid the deadly detonation that'll turn an engine to scrap in an instant.

A diesel will fire when enough heat is generated to ignite the air-fuel mixture. Compression creates heat, and with enough heat, it fires, with or without an additional heat sourse. The heater warms the fuel to keep #2 from gelling when #1 should really be being used, as we do in the winter up here. Glow plugs insure initial, and proper burn by maintaining a heat source. When relying on compression, low temps do increase air density, and this increases the heat generated, as static compression is higher, BUT cold fuel being atomized in the combustion chamber cools it, and so does the cold charge of fresh air and the cold engine. The high temperature generated from compression alone may not be enough to ignite the charge if weather is too cold and compression ratio is low for any reason. Forged pistons fit looser than cast so they rock and bang a lot more until they heat up and fit tight like a cast does, so ring seal is less than optimal when cold. Glow plugs are a good idea, so is higher compression, preheated intake or fuel. If compression is high enough, none of it is necessary on a diesel engine.

Very high compression is hard on the reciprocating assembly though, and longevity suffers. Reduce compression some and add glow plugs and the reciprocating assembly needs not be so over built, more power with lighter components, and still good longevity.

The higher the compression, the more power it produces, and more efficient it is.

The guy I worked with had a '92 Dodge, and just got a new one the last year we worked together. He'd commuted for ten years in it about 100 miles RT a day. It had a touch over 500,000 miles on it when he traded it in. It smoked a bit until he nearly hit the freeway a mile away, but was fine after that.

Dodges are rough riding rattle traps though, and Chevy has light running gear, Ford has them both beat, always has. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

I'd like to get a new 6.0L quadcab shortbox F350 King Ranch in a year or two, but I'm not buying one up here when I do!

Eric,
Nice Rig!
Super Swamper just started making 34.5" x 12.5" tires especially for the F250 and 350 so you don't need a lift. Go Boggers!

There's also an electric locker now too, Detroit Elec-Trac... SWEET!! I'm getting one for the front end on my 4x.
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  #52  
Old 02-23-2004, 08:17 AM
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Join Date: May 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
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Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

Good information there Brent.

I did post the wrong way about the commpression of the gas vs diesel.

As for Glow plugs in the Ford, had my fill of them and that's really the only complaint other then the weak automatic transmissions Ford has "always" put in until going to the new one recently. We shall see how they hold up.

AS for your friend with the Dodge and 500,000 miles, that speaks volumns about the Dodge Cummins engine. I'm sure the older year of it is why you mentioned a rattletrap. After 12 years they all start to make noise. Possibly that's the only one your familar with and it's an old one to boot? Must admit, the Dodge was built extremely heavy duty back then. The axles are actually 1 ton and single fronts.No twin I beam or coil springs in them back then.

The new Dodges s I've been in are very low in any noise rateings. Add the HO Cummins and you have an engine that will outlive the truck, by far and probably the competition to.

As far as starting problems in cold weather, have talked to several people that live and work in Alaska and do repair and upkeep on the oil pipeline and they said the best diesel for starting in the cold weather up there has "always" been the Dodge Cummins?

Anyway, to each his own but, I'll certainly take the Cummins everytime over anything out there and I have had the Ford diesel to make my comparison.
Any new one I buy will be standard shifts to unless Allison wants to put a transmission in a Dodge?

I think each Diesel available to the consumer has it's good and bad points but, when looking at the power plants, which is the Most important aspect of diesel ownership, the Cummins has always been---"Top Dog" and as far as longevity will "spank" the rest of them.

Later
DC
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  #53  
Old 02-23-2004, 09:03 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: mi
Posts: 991
Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

First time off road with the new truck. A hunting buddy (BOB) and I went out cutting wood for the fire places yesterday 3/4 mile off the road in a bean field. When we started out in the field it was in the hi 20s with 6" crusty snow. We cut down a big dead elm. Then pulled it out of the woods with sleds to the trucks. The temp was getting up there close to 40 and the snow was melting fast in the field. I was picking up the last of my chain saws when Bob started out with his Ford F-250 diesel 4x4 loaded over the bed with wood he maid it about 30 Foot and was stuck. Luck for us I had my Tire chains in my truck I gave Bob a bag of chains for his truck and put one set on the back wheels of my truck then went over to Bobs truck to help hem put a set on his truck. Then we took off towards the road when we got to the road Bob was impressed with the chains and is ordering a set for his truck today. The chains we used are the heavy duty chains for mud.
Crow Mag
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  #54  
Old 02-23-2004, 09:26 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Livonia, MI
Posts: 108
Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

It is truly impressive what these trucks will do with chains. I have a set for the front and rear of my truck. She has pulled through 28 inches of unplowed snow with the chains on. You have to watch the snow pileing up in front of the truck so you don't clog up the fresh air intake. Hunting in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom can get real interesting real fast. It snowed all night...coming down 2 inches an hour at times.

Matt
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  #55  
Old 02-23-2004, 03:06 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Palmer, Alaska
Posts: 2,539
Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

The Dodge did surprise me at 500,000 mi. He replaced the injector pump somewhere along the road, I didn't ask when. Other than that, tires, grease, oil and filters is about all he paid for. Quite impressive any way you look at it.

The time it takes to pay for the extra $$$ it costs for the diesel motor upgrade, you can buy a lot of gas for years for that much. Gas engines always start in cold weather too (running synthetic oil). Parts for a gas engine are loads cheaper, and todays engines will last nearly half the life of a diesel their built so tight.

I still want one!

What do you guys par for diesel across the country down there? Gas or diesel prices up here just bite!

The 7.3L will always be capable of more HP and torque, they're just detuned so much to keep from twisting running gear up it's a joke.

Someone told me that Ford was making a V10 twin turbo for an F250 4x4 Harley Davidson Edition, but I can't confirm it anywhere. That would be a torque monster!!

The rattle trap - Stiff riding SOB's, new or old. This loosens 'em up in short order, just a little worse than the Ford from what I know. The Ford is better riding, but the Chevy has always been built too light duty.
The cab on the Dodge has a boatload of room in it, or it seems that way to me.

These rigs weigh so damn much, if you can keep 'em hooked up, they WILL keep going!! Their weight on icy roads is nice, more like the big rigs than anything else you'll drive, stud 'em up and fly!

With propane injection, the diesel really makes use of the fuel, with performance that is just through the roof! Propane is probably a buck eighty a gallon up here right now though. I'm not sure of the ratio to diesel it's injected at, but gas mileage and power both are an unreal gain! ATS? is who I've read makes the best system for this.

Someone makes the spinning chain drum systems for trucks just like the ones on school busses, those would be nice. I think they're operated by an onboard air compressor. Not sure how far they hang down, but makes chaining up is a thing of the past.
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  #56  
Old 02-23-2004, 03:55 PM
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Join Date: May 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,757
Re: Diesel Truck for hunting

500,000 miles????

It don't surprise me at all with the Cummins. I know of some that have more miles then that. I have a friend in California that has that many on a Ford eekkkk.
He bought it new and it's the old 6.9 which was just before the 7.3. He has had to do quite a bit of work to it though to keep it running.

Anyway, there is a lot of room in the Dodge compaired to the others (it seems) and the fuel down here is running at $1.62 per gallon. I saw one truck stop that had it for $1.57 last week.

The fuel economy is the key for the diesels. Where the gas engines are getting 10 and 12 MPG, the diesel is getting 20 to 22 without a load.

Now pull a heavy load with the gas and one "Might get" 7 or 8 with it while the diesel is getting 15 to 17 miles per gallon.

To me it's worth it to drive the diesel. Better fuel enonomy and they will last OVER 2 or 3 times longer then ANY gas engine and normally with little maintenance.

Diesels are the way to go "IF" you need the extra power and are pulling large trailers.

Later
DC
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