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Bedding the Recoil Lug.

 
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  #1  
Old 04-18-2005, 04:30 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Northamptonshire England
Posts: 675
Bedding the Recoil Lug.

Hi everyone,
A friend and myself were discussing the ins and outs of a bedding job, when he asked me why the recoil lug on a Rem 700 is clearenced on the front, sides and bottom in most instructions, yet we have come across bedding jobs Where the recoil lug is completely bedded. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

I explained that i think the clearenced method is correct and is done so for expansion purposes when the action and chamber warm after up several firings, am i right? i dont know, can anybody explain the reason for the clearence and if it is the correct way to do the job. Thanks a lot.

Ian.
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  #2  
Old 04-18-2005, 05:00 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: NY
Posts: 394
Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

[ QUOTE ]
I explained that i think the clearenced method is correct and is done so for expansion purposes when the action and chamber warm after up several firings, am i right? i dont know, can anybody explain the reason for the clearence and if it is the correct way to do the job.

[/ QUOTE ]

You have the idea! If there is no clearence the recoil lug will expand upon heating and could force itself upward causing stress and all kinds of funny things to POI once hot. The clearence also makes it easier to remove the barreled action if needed.

Frank D
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  #3  
Old 04-18-2005, 09:44 AM
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Join Date: May 2001
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Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

I relieve the front and bottom of the recoil lug area when bedding. I leave the back and side area intact as I believe these are the areas doing the work I desire. I don't want the rifle moving to the rear nor do I want it to torque in the stock.
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  #4  
Old 04-18-2005, 11:46 AM
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Posts: 1,459
Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

I fully bed the recoil lugs on all my rifles. So far, no issue with accuracy as things heat up. I bed because I want that action to be a glove fit in the stock. Also, to remove any loads on the action screws.

If I leave clearance around the recoil lug on a round bottom receiver, I place torque and shifting loads on the action screw. All you are doing is making sure the recoil lug is sitting on a flat surface. The lug is not working to its full potential.

If this is the goal, don't bother bedding the lug at all. Just make sure the lug is flush against the rear of its mortise. The Savage plastic stocks are inletted this way and work quite well. With strong pillars, the recoil loads are placed on the action screws and these pillars. I don't like it so bed the lug fully.

If the pillars are not a tight fit on the screws, shifting can and will occur as the bedding wears. This can lead to flyers and irritating issues.

Action expansion is so small even when things get toasty. I doubt few will shoot until the action can burn your skin. At that point, it is still 'cold' by metal standards. Accuracy has already gone south due to barrel warping. I don't think stress in the bedding/action would be a concern.

I feel that gunsmiths like the idea of not fully bedding because it is a royal pain to take apart. Plus with many using pillars as part of their bedding, at added cost, there has been no issue with accuracy. Not until rd counts get up there.

I want pillars to stop the crushing of the stock. I want the recoil lug to handle all recoil loads of the action. A little extra effort for a solid fit me thinks...

Jerry
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Old 04-19-2005, 06:43 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Northamptonshire England
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Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

Hi Jerry,
Your explaination makes a whole lot a sense to me, but there are still a few areas of confusion. My buddy is in the process of bedding his Remmy into a prototype composite stock and instrucions we have downloaded from the net, especially those by, may i say: Darrel Holland and Gale Mcmillan both advocate the clearence on the front, sides and bottom of the recoil lug. They both also recomend clearence on the action screws in the pillars and emphasize strongly that there must not be any contact between the action screws and the pillars. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

To me this would allow the action to move forward to certain degree, which cant be good for accuracy
I remember that the Stolle action in my bench gun was fully bedded all around with no detriment to accuracy.

Any more information would help enormously as we want to finnish the bedding this week. Thanks.

Ian.
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  #6  
Old 04-19-2005, 10:07 AM
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Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 2,369
Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

I agree that there must be some clearance between the action screws and the pillars/screw holes. Recoiling on the screws is probably not a good idea, just take a look at the split M98 stocks that are around (Interarms are fairly commonly split at the palm stock from recoiling on the rear action screw).
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  #7  
Old 04-19-2005, 11:22 AM
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Re: Bedding the Recoil Lug.

I bet that somewhere in those instructions, they also need you to torque the hell out of your action screws during install. 65 in/lbs comes to mind.

Personally, this is not how I would do the bedding and doesn't make any sense to me. But then I don't see much use in the inletting in most fancy alum chassis stocks either.

Something has to hold that action in place. Either the recoil lug or action screws are going to bear the load. There is nothing else hanging below to stop movement during fire. I certainly don't think the trigger group is much use.

The style of bedding that you described requires that friction be what holds things together. That is why many of these tactical stocks and gunsmiths want you to torque down the action screws.

This leads to movement, eventually, inconsistencies because things move, and excessive wear. It can also lead to bent actions. Every alum chassis stock I have worked on bent the action during install. The worse bent the action 1/8"!!!!

To check, put your hand on top of the action and tighten/loose the action screw. Feel any movement? I bet you do. If you can feel something, that is a lot of movement. So much for accurized, trued and lapped action.

I want all loads to go through that recoil lug. I want it to be secure in all three axis. I want little to no load on the action screws (having space around the screws in the pillars is not a bad idea but really doesn't matter if the recoil lug takes the loads).

I don't need to torque down those action screws. With the way I do it, the screws go from loose to full hand tight in 1/2 rotation. I know everything is locked down and will not move under fire. The action screws don't go loose during use and I don't need any loctite to make that happen.

The bedding jobs I have done have made EVERY rifle more consistent and improved accuracy on most. The biggest benefactors where those rifles that were bedded as you described.

But then I don't get excited about 1/2" groups at 100yds. At 200 and 300yds, now you get my attention.

Jerry
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