Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics


Reply

What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #22  
Old 12-16-2013, 08:34 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Central, KY
Posts: 336
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiftydriver View Post
Pure and simple, bore temperature kills throat life. It really does not matter how much powder you burn in a chambering or how little, its how hot the barrel is and if you continue to shoot the rifle that will determine how long or short your rifle lasts.

Some of my wildcats are pretty extreme but if you keep the barrel cool and clean, they last for a suprising long time. On the other side of the coin, if you take a chambering with much less capacity, get the barrel hot and keep shooting, it will erode a throat much more quickly then a larger capacity chambering that is properly used and cared for.

Muzzle velocity has very little to do with bore wear.

Powder type also has very little difference. In the end, its how hot the bore gets and if you keep shooting the rifle. This may mean you need to keep shot strings to less then three shots and allow barrel to cool between each which is exactly my recommendation for all my customers using my extreme performance rifles.

Simply comes down to keeping the bore clean and most importantly, keep it cool.

Now, some barrel steels withstand barrel wear better then others. The harder stainless steel in cut rifled barrels tends to offer slightly longer throat life then a button pulled barrel.

Throat design also is a factor. The tighter the throat and to some degree, the shorter the throat, the longer the accuracy life of a barrel will be but again in the end, bore temp while firing is BY FAR the most important factor in barrel life.

Keep em clean and cool and they will last much longer then most would ever believe.
Hey Kirby, don't want to derail this thread, but could you elaborate on how cleaning helps prolong the accurate life of the barrel? It seems I read more that people don't clean their bores until accuracy drops off...... could be hundreds of rounds.

Should you only use a powder and carbon solvent until accuracy drops off then attack the copper, or just keep it clean with somthing like Bore Tech between range trips?
__________________
Thanks,
Scott
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-16-2013, 08:57 PM
Official LRH Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Fort Shaw, Montana
Posts: 6,807
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

Quote:
Originally Posted by scsims View Post
Hey Kirby, don't want to derail this thread, but could you elaborate on how cleaning helps prolong the accurate life of the barrel? It seems I read more that people don't clean their bores until accuracy drops off...... could be hundreds of rounds.

Should you only use a powder and carbon solvent until accuracy drops off then attack the copper, or just keep it clean with somthing like Bore Tech between range trips?
With the chamberings I deal with most often, carbon fouling is as big of a problem as copper fouling is. If carbon builds up, your accuracy will drop off.

Also, any fouling in the bore can attract moisture and cause the finish of the bore to degrade from corrosion, that is always a bad thing.

Cleaning really does not increase bore life per say but keeping your bore clean reduces the chance that dirt, dust and grit can get into your receiver, chamber and bore. All three can reduce the life of the entire weapon system if left in the rifle while in operation.
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-17-2013, 02:39 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: NC, oceanfront
Posts: 3,264
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

I know it's swimming upstream to say, but I thinks it's a bad idea to leave bores fouled for extended periods. I also think it's a bad idea to shoot many rounds between cleanings(100-200).

For ACCURATE barrel life, we need to control carbon.
Ignoring it for the sake of stable fouling, is like ignoring an infection -until it takes you out of service.
By then, it's gonna take more than a minor antibiotic to recover. It's gonna mean stopping everything until you get that carbon out of there.
And if you don't, like many don't, and you continue shooting, you're shortening your barrel life. This, because bore constriction continues to develop -faster.

The most practical way for us to extend barrel life, for real, is melonite treatment. If I shot a lot of powder like you guys, I wouldn't hesitate for 1 second on getting this done for my barrels.
All my future barrels will get it, the moment I know it shoots.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-17-2013, 02:41 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Sedalia, MO
Posts: 1,253
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

I'm a bit surprised that no one has mentioned this so far, but in my experience, one of the primary factors that goes into the faster destruction of a barrel is bullet weight. Simply put, heavier bullets are harder than lighter bullets, other factors being equal. The reason for this seems pretty simple, and that is basically dwell time. The heavier bullets have more inertia to overcome as the bullet begins moving down the barrel. During that time, the hot powder gases and very high pressures spend more time doing their damage to the throat area than they would with a lighter bullet which gets out of the way a good bit more quickly.

There's other factors at work as well, but in a straight apples to apples comparison, that's a huge one. Having washed out several hundred barrels over the years, there's no doubt in my mind that bullet weight is a (or more likely, "the") major factor in bore life.
__________________
Kevin Thomas
Lapua USA
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-17-2013, 04:31 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: NC, oceanfront
Posts: 3,264
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

No single factor passes all tests because it's a combination.

A competitive 6PPC -vs- 338
Attached Thumbnails - Click to View Larger
What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?-6ppcbl.jpg   What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?-338bl.jpg  

Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-19-2013, 02:51 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The rifle range, or archery range or behind the computer in Alaska
Posts: 3,515
Re: What kills barrel life on bigger magnums?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Thomas View Post
I'm a bit surprised that no one has mentioned this so far, but in my experience, one of the primary factors that goes into the faster destruction of a barrel is bullet weight. Simply put, heavier bullets are harder than lighter bullets, other factors being equal. The reason for this seems pretty simple, and that is basically dwell time. The heavier bullets have more inertia to overcome as the bullet begins moving down the barrel. During that time, the hot powder gases and very high pressures spend more time doing their damage to the throat area than they would with a lighter bullet which gets out of the way a good bit more quickly.

There's other factors at work as well, but in a straight apples to apples comparison, that's a huge one. Having washed out several hundred barrels over the years, there's no doubt in my mind that bullet weight is a (or more likely, "the") major factor in bore life.
I'm glad you indicated a straight apples to apples comparison because if dwell time was the only factor, a 300rum running 150s would out live a 308 running 150s. But we all know the reality here.

I tend to agree with you. I recently performed an 'arc flash study' for some electrical systems recently. One thing I learned was that the intensity of an arc flash (an electrical fault caused by the ionization of air around electrical terminals or busses which is hotter than the surface of the sun) compared to the severity are two totally different things. Intensity is how big and hot the flash but the severity accounts for the duration of the arc. An arcing current of 4000 amps with a .04 second duration is A LOT less severe than an arcing current of 2000 amps that lasts .4 seconds. Time here is the difference between curable 2nd degree burns to humans verses non curable burns. I guess the same principal could be applied to the inside of a barrel.

I also know from first hand experience that carbon rings kill barrels. These will definitely increase pressure. You have to keep caked on carbon to a minimum. Especially in the throat area which can and will dramatically increase pressure when the bullet slams into that tight spot. The more 'over-bore' the cartridge, the faster and more severely the carbon rings develop. They don't come out with standard cleaning practices either so when you think your barrel is clean, you may still have remnants which just keep getting worse.
__________________
Long range shooting is a process that ends with a result. Once you start to focus on the result (where the shot goes, how big the group is, what your buck will score, what your match score is, what place you are in...) then you loose the capacity to focus on the process.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
Do you archery hunt for elk?
YES - 31.35%
58 Votes
NO - 52.97%
98 Votes
Not yet, but I plan to. - 15.68%
29 Votes
Total Votes: 185
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC