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What happened to the '06?

 
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  #64  
Old 05-08-2013, 11:37 AM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

Rich, I'm guessing if you were pushing 80K, you would at least be blowing a bunch of primers. 5 firings is about what I get out of my RP 300 RUM and WW 25-06 brass and I have pushed it harder. They are warm loads but I feel quite safe with them.
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  #65  
Old 05-08-2013, 12:07 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
Rich, I'm guessing if you were pushing 80K, you would at least be blowing a bunch of primers. 5 firings is about what I get out of my RP 300 RUM and WW 25-06 brass and I have pushed it harder. They are warm loads but I feel quite safe with them.
Thanks Mark! That is real world info. I'll let the rest of the members decide for themselves what is really going on here.......Rich
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  #66  
Old 05-08-2013, 12:38 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

Clint, I have another great idea for you! Do a wildcat off the 8mmx68S.

http://stevespages.com/jpg/cd8x68s.jpg

Neck it down to 308 and push the shoulder down from 15* to 30* or 35* or 40* or whatever and blow the shoulder out from .478 to say .500. You will have about the same capacity as a 300 WM and it isn't officially a magnum, it's a 8x68S wildcat And you could have a nice long neck.

You could load it mild or warm as you want with a slow powder like Retumbo and get anywhere from 30-06 to 300 WM velocities.

And RWS brass is as good as any.

You could call it anything you want like a 300 or 308 Breitwieser.
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  #67  
Old 05-08-2013, 01:46 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
Rich, I'm guessing if you were pushing 80K, you would at least be blowing a bunch of primers. 5 firings is about what I get out of my RP 300 RUM and WW 25-06 brass and I have pushed it harder. They are warm loads but I feel quite safe with them.
80,000psi sounds crazy I know, but how would you know that?

I can tell you what I know from first hand testing with both an Oehler 43 and a RSI pressure trace.
Extractor marks start to appear at 68-75,000psi with domestic brass.
Lapua brass can be much higher.

I have no idea how much pressure it takes to blow a primer (I have never blown one) and my pressure testing equipment only reads to 80,000psi.

The only way to know you are reasonably safe (without pressure testing equipment) is to make sure you do not exceed the maximum listed velocity for your powder/bullet.
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  #68  
Old 05-08-2013, 02:09 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

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Originally Posted by X-man View Post
80,000psi sounds crazy I know, but how would you know that?

I can tell you what I know from first hand testing with both an Oehler 43 and a RSI pressure trace.
Extractor marks start to appear at 68-75,000psi with domestic brass.
Lapua brass can be much higher.

I have no idea how much pressure it takes to blow a primer (I have never blown one) and my pressure testing equipment only reads to 80,000psi.

The only way to know you are reasonably safe (without pressure testing equipment) is to make sure you do not exceed the maximum listed velocity for your powder/bullet.
In my reloading experience, I see different high pressure signs and combination of signs from different rifles. No 2 have been exactly the same. I have seen ejector marks from my Senderos with less than published charges and less by several grains of my final max loads. Also have a 22-250 that craters all primers, starting loads, factory loads and max loads. Etc., etc. Pressure signs can be very difficult to read but I usually have a good idea of where I am and where my rifle's limit is.

Published data is a guide for me, not the final word. I have seen data for the 300 RUM where the starting load was higher in one manual than the max load in another for the same bullet and powder... Nosler and Hodgdon. Pressure/velocity ratios have many factors, including brass, primers, chamber/throat spec, bore spec, powder and/or primer lot, etc. There is no published data that specifically defines any particular load. Many times my max loads have been very close to published and sometimes not. And sometimes there is just no published data available. That is most time for me. Same goes for the Sherman case. There is no data for that so you have to interpolate as best as you can and then go with what you can discern through knowledge and experience.

I usually go until I feel a sticky bolt, unless I am seeing real flat primers and other signs, and then back off 1 or 2 grains. If my primer pockets are going after 2 or 3 firings, I back off. I define my max loads by how long my primer pockets last. So far it's worked for me. If i had pressure equipment, I would use that, but I don't. I use what I have and do the best I can
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Last edited by MontanaRifleman; 05-08-2013 at 03:09 PM.
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  #69  
Old 05-08-2013, 02:46 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
In my reloading experience, I see different high pressure signs and combination of signs from different rifles. No 2 have been exactly the same. I have seen ejector marks from my Senderos with less than published charges and less by several grains of my final max loads. Also have a 22-250 that craters all primers, starting loads, factory loads and max loads. Etc., etc. Pressure signs can be very difficult to read but I usually have a good idea of where I am and where my rifle's limit is.

Published data is a guide for me, not the final word. I have seen data for the 300 RUM where the starting load was higher in one manual than the max load in another for the same bullet and powder... Nosler and Hodgdon. Pressure/velocity ratios have many factors, including brass, primers, chamber/throat spec, bore spec, powder and/or primer lot, etc. There is no published data that specifically defines any particular load. Many times my max loads have been very close to published and sometimes not. And sometimes there is just no published data available. That is most time for me. Same goes for the Sherman case. There is no data for that so you have to interpolate as best as you can and then go with what you can discern through knowledge and experience.

I usually go until I feel a sticky bolt, unless I am seeing real flat primers and other signs, and then back off 1 or 2 grains. If my primer pockets are going after 2 or 3 firings, I back off. I define my max loads by how long my primer pockets last. So far it's worked for me. If i had pressure equipment, I would use that, but I don't. I use what i ahve and do the best I can
What you describe is near exactly what I do. I have been reloading, making bullets, and designing cartridges, etc ,for some 45 years now. I feel very comfortable with what I do........Rich
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  #70  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:08 PM
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Re: What happened to the '06?

I get that you know your way around the reloading thing. That isn't what I was asking though (my bad).

I was referring to this part.
"I'm guessing if you were pushing 80K, you would at least be blowing a bunch of primers"
How do you know he isn't at 80K (or higher) or at what pressure primers start to blow?
I don't know what pressure starts to blow primers and I have the testing gear.
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