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The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

 
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  #64  
Old 08-14-2011, 01:25 PM
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Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Magnum, Thanks for the pics. They always add to the conversation. One question for you though. Why the 270 WSM??? I have never understood the 27 caliber fascination. If it wasn't for Jack O'Conner I think that the 280 Remington would be recognized for its merits. There is nothing that the 270 Win does that the 280 doesn't do better in my opinion.
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  #65  
Old 08-14-2011, 03:36 PM
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Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?



Read all about it here:

The
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  #66  
Old 08-14-2011, 06:36 PM
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Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Quote:
Originally Posted by coyotezapper View Post
Magnum, Thanks for the pics. They always add to the conversation. One question for you though. Why the 270 WSM??? I have never understood the 27 caliber fascination. If it wasn't for Jack O'Conner I think that the 280 Remington would be recognized for its merits. There is nothing that the 270 Win does that the 280 doesn't do better in my opinion.
Coyote,

Thanks for your comment and question. Whilst respecting your view, I hold the contrary view and have done so for more year (decades) than I care to admit. I believe the popularity of the .270 (Win and WSM) is due to the inherent capabilities of the caliber and that the late great Jack O'Connor just wrote about them.

Having said that we are all reach our destination through different routes but it is the route that is colored by our experiences. For me the .270 Win was my second center-fire rifle back in the 70s (that's 1970s). Yes, I grew up on the writings of O'Connor and others, Keith, et al. But the 270 just impressed me with its ballistics. This rifle was based on a Mauser 98 and it shot sensationally and had power to spare for the hunting I'd do here. Hence the .270 Win became an instant favorite of mine.

Additionally I believe that the awesome capabilities of the .270 Win was extended with the introduction (in the 80s) of the 140 gr SPBT bullets. This bullet can be loaded to around 3,000 fps and gives almost as flat a trajectory as the famed 130 gr load but had (for all ranges past 100 yards) the retained energy of the 150 gr load. In the words of John Wootters (of Petersens publications), that's some compromise. The Hornady 140 gr interlock and SST with a BC of close to .5 is a favorite of mine.

In recent years I realized I had not had a 270 in my gun safe for 20 years and set about rectifying that. Being a traditionalist and liking classic rifles I found Winchester pre 64 M70 fwt in that caliber (I already had an identical rifle on .308 Win) on Gunsamerica and did the deal (and organized it's importation to Australia). The rest is history.

I have never been a 7mm fan and have only ever had a 7x57 (Ruger M77) for a while but sold it. I guess the 270 (launched in 1925) just had the jump on the 280 (lunched in 1957, I think). By the time the 280 was released the 270 had too great a hold amongst hunters (bit like the VSH and the Beta video recorders). The other issue, as Craig Boddington has pointed out in his writing, is the caliber jump (a mere .007") is just not significant enough and there is the great 30-06 if you want to go a bit larger, for the 180 gr plus bullets with really great penetration. I think this is my next purchase a Winchester pre 64 M70 fwt in 30-06), but that's another story. We are talking here about sheep/mountain rifles. Rifles that don't need the great penetration of some of the 7mm (and .30 cal 180 gr) bullets, but need to be flat shooting and light. This is what the 270 does best, in my view.

I understand that the 270 is the best selling of the WSMs. The 7mm WSM is not listed in Winchester Australia's product list for any of the Winchester or Browning rifles. Also Chuck Hawkes published a list of the most popular calibres, Readers Choice Rifle Cartridges. You will notice the .270 Win is No 3 whereas the .280 Rem does not appear.

Enjoy your hunting.
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Last edited by magnum; 08-14-2011 at 06:39 PM.
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  #67  
Old 08-14-2011, 10:15 PM
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Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Quote:
Originally Posted by magnum View Post
Coyote,

Thanks for your comment and question. Whilst respecting your view, I hold the contrary view and have done so for more year (decades) than I care to admit. I believe the popularity of the .270 (Win and WSM) is due to the inherent capabilities of the caliber and that the late great Jack O'Connor just wrote about them.

Having said that we are all reach our destination through different routes but it is the route that is colored by our experiences. For me the .270 Win was my second center-fire rifle back in the 70s (that's 1970s). Yes, I grew up on the writings of O'Connor and others, Keith, et al. But the 270 just impressed me with its ballistics. This rifle was based on a Mauser 98 and it shot sensationally and had power to spare for the hunting I'd do here. Hence the .270 Win became an instant favorite of mine.

Additionally I believe that the awesome capabilities of the .270 Win was extended with the introduction (in the 80s) of the 140 gr SPBT bullets. This bullet can be loaded to around 3,000 fps and gives almost as flat a trajectory as the famed 130 gr load but had (for all ranges past 100 yards) the retained energy of the 150 gr load. In the words of John Wootters (of Petersens publications), that's some compromise. The Hornady 140 gr interlock and SST with a BC of close to .5 is a favorite of mine.

In recent years I realized I had not had a 270 in my gun safe for 20 years and set about rectifying that. Being a traditionalist and liking classic rifles I found Winchester pre 64 M70 fwt in that caliber (I already had an identical rifle on .308 Win) on Gunsamerica and did the deal (and organized it's importation to Australia). The rest is history.

I have never been a 7mm fan and have only ever had a 7x57 (Ruger M77) for a while but sold it. I guess the 270 (launched in 1925) just had the jump on the 280 (lunched in 1957, I think). By the time the 280 was released the 270 had too great a hold amongst hunters (bit like the VSH and the Beta video recorders). The other issue, as Craig Boddington has pointed out in his writing, is the caliber jump (a mere .007") is just not significant enough and there is the great 30-06 if you want to go a bit larger, for the 180 gr plus bullets with really great penetration. I think this is my next purchase a Winchester pre 64 M70 fwt in 30-06), but that's another story. We are talking here about sheep/mountain rifles. Rifles that don't need the great penetration of some of the 7mm (and .30 cal 180 gr) bullets, but need to be flat shooting and light. This is what the 270 does best, in my view.

I understand that the 270 is the best selling of the WSMs. The 7mm WSM is not listed in Winchester Australia's product list for any of the Winchester or Browning rifles. Also Chuck Hawkes published a list of the most popular calibres, Readers Choice Rifle Cartridges. You will notice the .270 Win is No 3 whereas the .280 Rem does not appear.

Enjoy your hunting.


Magnum,


Your path sounds a lot like mine. I also grew up hunting in the 70's. My first rifle was a Winchester M70 pre 64 243 winchester. I still own it today, although it never gets used anymore. I keep it has a collectible. At 17 I bought my first 7MM Mag and I have been a 7MM fan ever since. Right now I have a 7MM STW, 7MM Rem Mag, and my sheep rifle which is a 7MM 08 Ackley. It seems that the 7MM is either a hate it or love type of caliber. To each his own. I am building ( in a holding pattern right now waiting on reamer ) 6.5x47 Lapua and I have been told that once I shoot a 6.5 I will never look back. I don't think this will happen since in centerfires I shoot .17 to .35 calibers and they each have their place. If it has a trigger and goes bang I will most likely find a use for it. GOOD HUNTING!!!!
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  #68  
Old 08-15-2011, 02:18 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 48
Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Quote:
Originally Posted by coyotezapper View Post
Magnum,


Your path sounds a lot like mine. I also grew up hunting in the 70's. My first rifle was a Winchester M70 pre 64 243 winchester. I still own it today, although it never gets used anymore. I keep it has a collectible. At 17 I bought my first 7MM Mag and I have been a 7MM fan ever since. Right now I have a 7MM STW, 7MM Rem Mag, and my sheep rifle which is a 7MM 08 Ackley. It seems that the 7MM is either a hate it or love type of caliber. To each his own. I am building ( in a holding pattern right now waiting on reamer ) 6.5x47 Lapua and I have been told that once I shoot a 6.5 I will never look back. I don't think this will happen since in centerfires I shoot .17 to .35 calibers and they each have their place. If it has a trigger and goes bang I will most likely find a use for it. GOOD HUNTING!!!!
Coyote,

Although we may differ in detail, I love to hear of hunter with passion for a caliber.

+1
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  #69  
Old 12-27-2012, 03:15 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2012
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Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Allthough i have not hunted sheep with it yet, i do feel the Nice WY mountain goat billy i got in 2009 counts for opinion.

My rig is a weatherby Ultralight weight MKV in 30-06(5.2LB). its topped with a Swaroski Z3 3x9-36(11.5oz) sitting in talley onepeice low rings/bases, and with 3 rds of 165gnr Barnes TSX/TTSX and a butler creek sling weighs 6.9lb just under 7 lbs with a ammo and sling aint bad considering it has a 24" barrel. took my billy at 340 yards, most people like short action rifles and think they are lighter,( true except with short action magnums WSM) the barrel countor and chamber countor is heavier then standard calibers. .308 is probally optimum for short action rifle but i like the extra case capacity of the gold old out dated best rifle caliber in the world 30-06. with my handloads is produces 7mm performance in a less bulky package. i like the 165/168grn bullets because the buck wind better then 150's but still shoot flat and retain enegry down range. just my take. the hard part is not deciding on a rifle or making the shot, its getting a TAG to harvest on of the maginificant sheep or goats.
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  #70  
Old 12-28-2012, 11:58 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: La Plata NM
Posts: 370
Re: The Ultimate Light Weight Sheep Hunting Rifle - What Is It?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brian loeb View Post
Allthough i have not hunted sheep with it yet, i do feel the Nice WY mountain goat billy i got in 2009 counts for opinion.

My rig is a weatherby Ultralight weight MKV in 30-06(5.2LB). its topped with a Swaroski Z3 3x9-36(11.5oz) sitting in talley onepeice low rings/bases, and with 3 rds of 165gnr Barnes TSX/TTSX and a butler creek sling weighs 6.9lb just under 7 lbs with a ammo and sling aint bad considering it has a 24" barrel. took my billy at 340 yards, most people like short action rifles and think they are lighter,( true except with short action magnums WSM) the barrel countor and chamber countor is heavier then standard calibers. .308 is probally optimum for short action rifle but i like the extra case capacity of the gold old out dated best rifle caliber in the world 30-06. with my handloads is produces 7mm performance in a less bulky package. i like the 165/168grn bullets because the buck wind better then 150's but still shoot flat and retain enegry down range. just my take. the hard part is not deciding on a rifle or making the shot, its getting a TAG to harvest on of the maginificant sheep or goats.
How about some pics of your billy? We would love to see them!!
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