Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics

Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics Applied Ballistics


Reply

Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #22  
Old 10-06-2008, 11:54 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Bend, Oregon
Posts: 1,266
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

Here we are all put back together.







Well, how did it all work?

This is how the 257 shot before




This was my first group after bedding my 257Wby.



Another the same day.



My Weatherbys work okay.

Note: The bedding details are ofmy 300Wby. The groups are from my 257Wby.
__________________
Build a man a fire and you heat him for a day.
Set him on fire and you heat him for life.

Only accurate rifles are interesting.

Gordy and Brady.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-07-2008, 01:04 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Back in the south -NW FL..
Posts: 1,142
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

Fullcurlhunter ,

I think you should take the advise of Hired Gun and Dave -and float the barrel ,you're taking the time to do load developement that you might have to retune later when you do float it.Cut to the chase float it now -i'm sure your load will change very little.
Your gun will be/stay much closer to POI once you float the barrel.

When you get ready to bed it -use a true bedding kit -it will give you a more generous amount of time to work w/ the bedding -marine tex sets up pretty quick -too quick for a first timer.

I'll throw in a couple of bedding tips i use.

Look at the amount of volume it will take to fill the area you are bedding and put a sufficient amount in -too much makes a mess.

Have some paper towels w/ gun oil ready to wipe off any excess bedding material.

Wrap tape [enough wraps of electrical tape to touch the stock] around the barrel until it has filled in the floated area -that way when you put the gun into the bedding you won't have the front of the barrel touching the stock and the rear action screw in the air .
This will keep you from digging the recoil lug into the bedding and pushing the bedding material back ,meaning if the barrelled action isn't being held down by the screws the front of the action and barrel will mash the bedding wrong.So- that tape will keep the action and barrel sitting level in the stock.

After cleaning up the bedding around the edges -i take a black permanent marker and color the edge of the bedding black -it makes the lighter colored bedding material disappear.
It makes a good looking shadow effect between the action and stock.

Get some clay model material -clay -you can get it in the crafts section at x-mart.
Use it to keep bedding material from going into areas you don't want it in.
Take a small piece -rolled up round and put it at the front on the recoil lug so the bedding doesn't squish forward farther than you want.
Take a knife and cut it square to the stock so that you have a nice backing for the bedding to go up against.


Good luck w/ your hunt and business! -Mike
__________________
AIPAC for president !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-10-2008, 06:56 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: York, Pa.
Posts: 593
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

Gentlemen,
I have to disagree with floating the barrel on an Ultra Light Weight. I don't think that Weatherby put all effort into R&D to not have the pressure point. I fully agree on the Accumarks that the barrel be floated as this is the way they come from the factory too. The barrel has to have side good clearance of the stock too.
.
I have 2 Light Weight both in 257 and they both shot their best with the pressure point. As a matter of fact they didn't shoot worth bucket of mud with out them even after several different load combo's
.
As for the flutes, just fill with modelers clay and build your dams with the same for installing the pressure point with bedding compound. they trick is getting the right the right height for the right pressure. Just measure the height BEFORE removing factory bumps. What I did was to use cut credit cards (a good thing) to get the the right pressure and height then miked them.
.
All my 3 Weatherby's have the recoil lugs fully bedded.
__________________
Kevin
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-11-2008, 06:43 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pennsyltucky
Posts: 2,625
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

if you have a gun that shoots better with a pressure point, i'll almost bet the farm that the receiver/ bolt lug/ barrel fit is not very good. a PP will cover this up to a degree. that's why it's common for production guns to have it. ask the smiths on here how many guns they build with light barrels where they have a pressure point at the front of the stock. i'm not going to say never, but it's rare.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-11-2008, 08:34 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: York, Pa.
Posts: 593
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

Dave,
My point exactly. Factory production rifle receiver, barrel, chamber, bolt face and lug areas. The reason for the pressure point to be needed. Granted, the first thing I normally do is to remove the pressure point on any rifle I acquire. This has proven to be of better accuracy. He (Full Curl) could try it with the point removed. His rifle may be of the few factories (Weatherby's light weights) that benefits from it. I bet his load is going to be changed.
My experience with the lightweight barreled Weatherby's is to have a pressure point. Once the factory barrel is shot out and a replacement installed all pressure points are out even if it's a factory match contour. Pending blueprinting the entire action too.
.
Like I said this is my experience with them.
__________________
Kevin
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-13-2008, 08:27 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 57
Re: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)

Excellent, thanks for all of the information guys! I still havent been out to the range yet to confirm 82.0 grain load with some more shooting in hopes of getting it sighted in to where I want it for hunting purposes.

This winter I plan to glass bed the action and potentially remove the pressure points. If I do remove the pressure points, I am going to take clay and make an exact mold of the current pressure points so I can make new ones just like the current if the gun does not improve with floating.

From the recommendations, it seems that fully bedding the recil lug/block is recommended on the weatherby mk v action.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 4)
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kill Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 5) FullCurlHunter Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics 5 11-20-2008 03:47 PM
New Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 5) FullCurlHunter Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics 2 10-18-2008 01:04 AM
Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 3) FullCurlHunter Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics 0 10-02-2008 10:37 PM
Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 2) FullCurlHunter Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics 0 10-02-2008 10:35 PM
Results: Load Development & Accurizing (part 1) FullCurlHunter Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics 0 10-02-2008 10:33 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC