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View Poll Results: Would you buy a Rem 700
Yes 550 74.53%
No 188 25.47%
Voters: 738. You may not vote on this poll

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Remington 700 quality

 
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  #78  
Old 04-05-2012, 01:54 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bend, Or
Posts: 332
Re: Remington 700 quality

A week to get there, 2 weeks to get fixed and a week to get it back. I specified factory repair only and had them send me a shipping label to their facility rather than a service center.
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  #79  
Old 04-05-2012, 09:25 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 969
Re: Remington 700 quality

I've got an older J lock generation stainless BDL in 7mm Rem that is not as nicely machined as my 5R that was built last year. The older BDL receiver needed a bit more attention to clean up and the scope base required bedding.

Aside from the machining, the J lock rifle's bolt handle fell off a couple weeks ago while safety testing a new trigger. I've always heard of it happening, but the only time I've seen it is when a friend of mine over pressured a 300 RUM Sendero.

So, for me, the QC is actually better now than it was 10 or so years ago. At least when comparing these two rifles.
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  #80  
Old 04-05-2012, 10:34 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,644
Re: Remington 700 quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentc View Post
I've got an older J lock generation stainless BDL in 7mm Rem that is not as nicely machined as my 5R that was built last year. The older BDL receiver needed a bit more attention to clean up and the scope base required bedding.

Aside from the machining, the J lock rifle's bolt handle fell off a couple weeks ago while safety testing a new trigger. I've always heard of it happening, but the only time I've seen it is when a friend of mine over pressured a 300 RUM Sendero.

So, for me, the QC is actually better now than it was 10 or so years ago. At least when comparing these two rifles.
you know I've heard from several sources about the bolt handle literally falling off from time to time, but have never really witnessed it myself. Now I could see a guy bear hunting, and wanting to make a second shot while filling his shorts! I did actually have a barrel come loose on a Colt Match Target pistol once. I kept adjusting the rear sight not reallizing the barrel was loose.
gary
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  #81  
Old 04-05-2012, 07:44 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Colorado Springs
Posts: 7
Re: Remington 700 quality

I will never buy another Rem 700. I had 2 that shot great (338 RUM and 22-250) so over a year ago I bought a new Rem 700 BDL in 243 Win. What a piece of crap that was. Tried bullets from 70gr to 105gr, different match primers, different cases, different powders and it would not shoot inside 3.5" at 100 yards. (Yes I checked the scope).

Drove me to buy the first box of factory ammo since I started reloading in the early 1960s and still the same result. I called Remington and they said that the rifle was "within factory specifications for accuracy." Essentially they told me to pound sand.

I freefloated the barrel and glass bedded the action and the accuracy came under 3" but was essentially still crappy.

I had a fundamental choice to sell the rifle (and stick some other sucker with it) or do something with it and decided on the latter. Took it to a gunsmith and had him true the action, lapp the lugs, put on a new barrel chamber in 243 AI, and then do a custom rebed. That fixed the problem, but I will never buy another new Rem and then risk having to spend another $750 to get it to shoot good again. Heck, I will spend that kind of money rebuilding an old Mauser or an old 1903 Springfield.... or ... just buy a new Ruger Hawkeye!!

Barstooler
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  #82  
Old 04-06-2012, 09:07 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 729
Re: Remington 700 quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barstooler View Post
I had a fundamental choice to sell the rifle (and stick some other sucker with it) or do something with it and decided on the latter. Took it to a gunsmith and had him true the action, lapp the lugs, put on a new barrel chamber in 243 AI, and then do a custom rebed. That fixed the problem, but I will never buy another new Rem and then risk having to spend another $750 to get it to shoot good again. Heck, I will spend that kind of money rebuilding an old Mauser or an old 1903 Springfield.... or ... just buy a new Ruger Hawkeye!!
Barstooler
Feel free to put a price on the aggravation as well. Making up hand loads to find one that works, changing scopes, trips to the range, purchasing different components when the first one should of worked, break-in period, frustrating phone calls to the manufacturer, your time ($$$$), drive time and finally, the time and money you spent to to have your gunsmith turn your "$750 blob of metal", into a rifle that shoots pretty good.

To calculate the value of your time, take what you would make per hour at your job and multiply it times the hours you spent chasing your tail trying to fix your new rifle + all the ancillary expenses including the purchase price. That's what owning a Remington has cost you.
Here's a link...Centerfire Rifle - Model 700 BDL - Remington Centerfire Rifles

If what they say doesn't line up with what you got, then you've got a legitimate gripe.
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  #83  
Old 04-06-2012, 11:48 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,644
Re: Remington 700 quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barstooler View Post
I will never buy another Rem 700. I had 2 that shot great (338 RUM and 22-250) so over a year ago I bought a new Rem 700 BDL in 243 Win. What a piece of crap that was. Tried bullets from 70gr to 105gr, different match primers, different cases, different powders and it would not shoot inside 3.5" at 100 yards. (Yes I checked the scope).

Drove me to buy the first box of factory ammo since I started reloading in the early 1960s and still the same result. I called Remington and they said that the rifle was "within factory specifications for accuracy." Essentially they told me to pound sand.

I freefloated the barrel and glass bedded the action and the accuracy came under 3" but was essentially still crappy.

I had a fundamental choice to sell the rifle (and stick some other sucker with it) or do something with it and decided on the latter. Took it to a gunsmith and had him true the action, lapp the lugs, put on a new barrel chamber in 243 AI, and then do a custom rebed. That fixed the problem, but I will never buy another new Rem and then risk having to spend another $750 to get it to shoot good again. Heck, I will spend that kind of money rebuilding an old Mauser or an old 1903 Springfield.... or ... just buy a new Ruger Hawkeye!!

Barstooler
welcome to my world! I was lucky in that I had access to all the best machine tools in the world, and knew where cigar boxes full of reamers were that I could borrow. I did not mess with the trigger or the bedding much on mine. I simply removed all that forend aluminum that got in the way, and pillar bedded it. Then rebedded the the reciever and recoil lug. My barrel was junk (and really still is). Went thru a couple trigger jobs, and finally traded it for a well done 1978 trigger that Mr. Pendel had laying around (still sadly missed). My factory chamber was about seven thousandths off center and roughly at a seven degree angle. Barrel was so rough that it actually tore up patches! It shot 5" groups with Federal Supreme ammo and about 4.25" with hand loads, so you got a better one than I got! It now shoots sub half inch groups, and has dipped into the very high threes on occassion. I like the rifle now, and it's my favorite coyote gun
gary
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  #84  
Old 04-06-2012, 11:52 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,644
Re: Remington 700 quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike 338 View Post
Feel free to put a price on the aggravation as well. Making up hand loads to find one that works, changing scopes, trips to the range, purchasing different components when the first one should of worked, break-in period, frustrating phone calls to the manufacturer, your time ($$$$), drive time and finally, the time and money you spent to to have your gunsmith turn your "$750 blob of metal", into a rifle that shoots pretty good.

To calculate the value of your time, take what you would make per hour at your job and multiply it times the hours you spent chasing your tail trying to fix your new rifle + all the ancillary expenses including the purchase price. That's what owning a Remington has cost you.
Here's a link...Centerfire Rifle - Model 700 BDL - Remington Centerfire Rifles

If what they say doesn't line up with what you got, then you've got a legitimate gripe.
Add the $750 to whatever the cost of the rifle was, and you no longer have a bargin. It cost me about $200 in parts and things I farmed out to be done. I never counted time involved, but spent several days working till five in the morning fixing issues with it.
gary
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