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remington 700 problem. help

 
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  #8  
Old 04-21-2013, 01:13 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Near Napoleon,MI
Posts: 997
Re: remington 700 problem. help

The rear scope rail you sent the link for has a windage adjustment. Did you try re-setting the windage turret to the middle of its range and then BORE SIGHTING the scope while adjusting the windage adjustment on the rear base ?

Just so were clear: Remove the bolt from the rifle. Put the gun into a bench rest or gun vice, pointed at a small reconizable target at about 25-50 yards. Center the target in the bore when viewed from the bolt position. Now peek through the scope without touching the gun to see where it is pointing at.

If I were you, I would center both turrets on the scope. If you read the manual, it will tell you how much travel it has in each axis. Then dial each axis until it (gently) reached the limit of travel one way. Now, taking note of the number of minutes per revolution of the turret, rotate it back half of the allowed movement. If you did not re-set your turret you should be close to the "zero" point on the turret.

Now adjust your scope base to get the scope pointed at the same place the barrel is pointed in windage.

I have never heard of someone stripping one of the scope base threads in a receiver. Often times, on cheap chinese made scope bases and rings, the screws themselves will be made of very soft steel and they themselves will strip easily.

If the thread really is stripped, they you have to go back to your smith again (this time take off the scope and bases yourself beforehand) and get the factory holes all drilled and tapped to the next size up. Buy yourself a steel one piece rail (picatinny style) and have him open up the counter sunk holes in the one piece base for the same screw size. If it was me getting this done. I would have him drill and ream and pin the one piece base to the receiver at the same time. That way it will never move on you, no matter what.

Usually, smiths charge about $15/hole so 4 holes should cost you $60 + 2 dowel holes will be $90.

Don't waste your time with micky mouse scope mounts when you put so much money into the optic to begin with.
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  #9  
Old 04-22-2013, 08:01 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 214
Re: remington 700 problem. help

Quote:
Originally Posted by westcliffe01 View Post
The rear scope rail you sent the link for has a windage adjustment. Did you try re-setting the windage turret to the middle of its range and then BORE SIGHTING the scope while adjusting the windage adjustment on the rear base ?

Just so were clear: Remove the bolt from the rifle. Put the gun into a bench rest or gun vice, pointed at a small reconizable target at about 25-50 yards. Center the target in the bore when viewed from the bolt position. Now peek through the scope without touching the gun to see where it is pointing at.

If I were you, I would center both turrets on the scope. If you read the manual, it will tell you how much travel it has in each axis. Then dial each axis until it (gently) reached the limit of travel one way. Now, taking note of the number of minutes per revolution of the turret, rotate it back half of the allowed movement. If you did not re-set your turret you should be close to the "zero" point on the turret.

Now adjust your scope base to get the scope pointed at the same place the barrel is pointed in windage.

I have never heard of someone stripping one of the scope base threads in a receiver. Often times, on cheap chinese made scope bases and rings, the screws themselves will be made of very soft steel and they themselves will strip easily.

If the thread really is stripped, they you have to go back to your smith again (this time take off the scope and bases yourself beforehand) and get the factory holes all drilled and tapped to the next size up. Buy yourself a steel one piece rail (picatinny style) and have him open up the counter sunk holes in the one piece base for the same screw size. If it was me getting this done. I would have him drill and ream and pin the one piece base to the receiver at the same time. That way it will never move on you, no matter what.

Usually, smiths charge about $15/hole so 4 holes should cost you $60 + 2 dowel holes will be $90.

Don't waste your time with micky mouse scope mounts when you put so much money into the optic to begin with.

you were right on the money!!! pretty much everything you said was true. the bases were misaligned, and the screw had been damaged, not the action. I already installed a picatinny rail, which I also bedded, and I will try the scope again tomorrow. Thank you so much for taking the time to reply.

That is the beauty of making new friends in these kinds of forums. I was able to overcome my problem thanks to you guys. For once more, thank you!
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  #10  
Old 04-22-2013, 08:12 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Near Napoleon,MI
Posts: 997
Re: remington 700 problem. help

I know that I can come across as harsh or prying, but to solve a problem one needs the facts... Glad to hear that you did not damage the receiver threads. Actions are made out of some pretty tough steel, it is not much fun drilling and tapping into that stuff...

Yes, doing a bore sighting ANY time you do anything to any part of the optical system is the surest and fastest way to get things sorted out and a lot cheaper than sending ammo downrange and then wondering where it hit. If you had seen me trying to sight in my muzzle loader when I got it, shooting 350gr lead bullets backed by 120gr of 777 powder, you would have really laughed. The problem was that the barrel fouled so bad with lead and powder residue, that when I did have it sighted in (first shot from a clean barrel), by the 5th shot I was not even on the paper.... And of course that load kicked like a mule and the powerbelt bullets were over $1 each, not counting the black powder and primers...

Later I switched to shooting 245gr jacketed bullets with a plastic "aero" tip with 110gr of Blackhorn 209, and my shoulder was no longer black and blue, the MV was much higher, the trajectory flatter, I could shoot 7 or 7 shots without cleaning (although accuracy still falls off) so live and learn...
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