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new barrel break in

 
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  #8  
Old 12-27-2012, 01:47 AM
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Re: new barrel break in

I follow the same as the others but I have been useing 3 patches of Shooters Choice and then patch it out with Sweets 7.62 or whatever the number is till the patches come out clear, then run 2 more with Shooters choice. I then run 2 dry patches and 1 patch with Butches gun oil, Rem oil,or Kroil.

If a bore is not seeming to break in I will add in some runs with a brush coated in Sweets to break anything loose and get a little more aggressive with the barrel and it has worked every time.
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2012, 07:18 AM
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Re: new barrel break in

chootem,

Welcome to LRH and enjoy! Most barrel makers have a recommended barrel break-in procedure ... I used Lilja's.

Sometimes it does not matter what efforts we do to make the barrel shoot better if it is not capable to start with (regardless of barrel maker), as seen here ...


Good luck and happy safe shooting/hunting.
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  #10  
Old 12-27-2012, 08:53 AM
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Location: West Virginia
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Re: new barrel break in

When I am trying to really clean a barrel I spray in a foaming bore cleaner to help loosen everything up (I use Gunslick) and let it set for about 20 minutes then I brush the bore a few passes with a broze brush follwed by a couple patches. I then use Butch's Bore Shine or Montana Extreme 50 BMG on a bore mop and let it set 5-10 minutes, make a couple passes with a brush then clean with patches and repeat if needed. The 50 BMG seems to be a little better than Butch's for copper fouling. When I am finished cleaning I run through a couple patches with Kroil on them and call it good.
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  #11  
Old 12-27-2012, 10:32 AM
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Re: new barrel break in

One thing I've observed regarding breaking in a barrel might be considered by others. Folks testing brand new barrels in rifles held in a machine rest eliminating all human variables learn the good ones shoot just fine without any break in. Bad ones shoot bad from the get go. They're convinced breaking in a barrel wears them out at the same rate as just shooting them for their intended use from the get-go.

When new barrels are held by humans and all their variables add to the barrels accuracy, sometimes they see improvement by breaking in, sometimes they don't. But there's no way they can separate their improved skills during breaking a barrel in from any better bore quality from wearing it out a tiny, tiny bit.

Consider the info in the following:

How to Break-in a Barrel
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  #12  
Old 12-27-2012, 02:28 PM
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Location: West Virginia
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Re: new barrel break in

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart B View Post
One thing I've observed regarding breaking in a barrel might be considered by others. Folks testing brand new barrels in rifles held in a machine rest eliminating all human variables learn the good ones shoot just fine without any break in. Bad ones shoot bad from the get go. They're convinced breaking in a barrel wears them out at the same rate as just shooting them for their intended use from the get-go.

When new barrels are held by humans and all their variables add to the barrels accuracy, sometimes they see improvement by breaking in, sometimes they don't. But there's no way they can separate their improved skills during breaking a barrel in from any better bore quality from wearing it out a tiny, tiny bit.

Consider the info in the following:

How to Break-in a Barrel

Good article and definitely something to think about.
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  #13  
Old 12-27-2012, 03:20 PM
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: South of Canada and North of Wyoming
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Re: new barrel break in

From the article...

Quote:
Consider this: every round shot in breaking-in a barrel is one round off the life of said rifle barrel.
Let's say we are shooting a factory 300 RUM with about a 1000 round life expectancy and it takes 25 rounds to break it in (if it takes more than 25, it's probably not going to get any better). Our spent life is 2.5%. Let's consider the "theoretical" advantages. If the break in process increases accuracy strings from 30 to 60 rounds that reduces the number of cleanings by about half. My standard procedure after cleaning is to shoot 3 or 4 rounds through it to settle it back in. Over the life of the rifle, that amounts to about 100 rounds or more for 30 round cleanings which would be reduced by about 50 rounds for 60 round cleanings... net gain = 25 more useful rounds of barrel life.

I did this process with my Sendero 300 RUM and accuracy strings are around 60-70. I can't really say if the accuracy string was increased by break-in because I had no base line to work from, but in the big picture a few rounds of break in isn't that big of deal.

For custom barrels it's a moot point. A good custom should break in in about 5 rounds give or take. That's nothing.



Quote:
Quote:
No one has ever told me the physical reason of what happens during break-in firing. In other words what, to the number of pounds of powder shot at any given pressure, is the life of the barrel. No one has ever explained what is being accomplished by shooting and cleaning in any prescribed method.
This really puzzles me as it is a very inaccurate statement. It has been very well explained by many folks including a number of barrel makers. Some barrel makers and smiths recommend it and some don't, but it has been explained. See post #3.

Quote:
Start your barrel off with 5 rounds and clean it thoroughly and do it again.
This is a useless method as most fouling occurs with the first shot. After the first shot, virtually nothing is accomplished by another shot if the fouling from the first has not been removed.

Quote:
It all got started when a barrel maker that I know started putting break-in instructions in the box with each barrel he shipped a few years ago. I asked him how he figured it would help and his reply was if they shoot 100 rounds breaking in this barrel
Asserting that it takes 100 rounds to break in a barrel is absurd. However, if he's referring the shoot 5 and clean method, it might take that. If it takes more than 25 shots, it's probably not gonna happen, so bag it.

I think it's also unfortunate that he is essentially besmirching other barrel makers, his competitors, for their motives. IME, good barrel makers have plenty of business and don't have to resort to this.
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  #14  
Old 12-27-2012, 09:30 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,592
Re: new barrel break in

There are some that don,t believe in brake in and others like myself that will not shoot any
new barrel without some break in.

I start break in from the first high pressure test load (Proof test) and clean after every shot
for an undetermined number of shots by reading the barrels performance.

I will start with a load and stick with it until I see an improvement in group size and ease of
clean up.

Most rifles will improve by 100% after 8 to 10 shots and may continue improving for 15 to
20 shots. (Note: these are custom barrels) factory barrels are normally much more.

Once a barrel settles in, then I can start trying other brands of ammo or load development
without it being a wast of time and money.

I learned my lesson with a rifle that shot less than 1 MOA with almost any ammo. After a range
session I would clean it until no copper fouling was present. The next time at the range it
performed almost identical to the last time, so I assumed that was as good as it was going to
get without working up some magical load.

300 rounds+/- later I had still not found any improvement in accuracy or clean up, So I decided
to do a full blown break in To see if it would improve. It took 12 shoot and clean shots before it
all came together. It went from .900 MOA average to .112 and after two sets of 3 shots and clean
it settled in at less than a 1/10 of an inch for 5 shots and a SD of 8.

It is a 30/378 and it now has 800+ rounds down the tube and has not fell off that 1/10 of an inch
if I do my part. While hunting I allways pull a bore snake through after each shot to sweep out
the powder fouling and I,m ready to go.

Anything run down the barrel will shorten barrel life some. but I believe that a clean bore does the least ammount of damage/wear and appears to lengthen barrel life. So I will take that chance to have a real performer.

J E CUSTOM
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