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Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

 
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  #22  
Old 03-15-2013, 11:44 AM
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Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

To the OP, few manufacturers make true 1:9 barrels anymore. Current Remingtons are 9.125 and current Savage are 9.25.

Also note that 42gr of H4350 is listed as a maximum load in the Hodgdon reloading manual, don't start there...

If you stick to the 1.070 hunting 95gr VLD you will be fine since it is rated for a 1:10 barrel.

The 95gr target VLD's would not shoot out of my Savage 12 even at maximum load, but I am shooting them in winter conditions, its possible that in summer they would be fine. However, I have little use for a "summer" hunting load...

Also the entire concept of jamming VLD's is no longer up to date. It is recommended to shoot them with a jump today. There is a sticky on this, just don't have time to find it right now. Jamming bullets may be fine for competition, but can be hazardous for hunting if you end up pulling the pullet out the cartridge when unloading. Jamming them dies work, IF you have the proper seating dies that set the distance to the ogive. Regular seating dies are useless for this.
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  #23  
Old 03-15-2013, 03:05 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Rapid city SD
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Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by westcliffe01 View Post
To the OP, few manufacturers make true 1:9 barrels anymore. Current Remingtons are 9.125 and current Savage are 9.25.

Also note that 42gr of H4350 is listed as a maximum load in the Hodgdon reloading manual, don't start there...

If you stick to the 1.070 hunting 95gr VLD you will be fine since it is rated for a 1:10 barrel.

The 95gr target VLD's would not shoot out of my Savage 12 even at maximum load, but I am shooting them in winter conditions, its possible that in summer they would be fine. However, I have little use for a "summer" hunting load...

Also the entire concept of jamming VLD's is no longer up to date. It is recommended to shoot them with a jump today. There is a sticky on this, just don't have time to find it right now. Jamming bullets may be fine for competition, but can be hazardous for hunting if you end up pulling the pullet out the cartridge when unloading. Jamming them dies work, IF you have the proper seating dies that set the distance to the ogive. Regular seating dies are useless for this.
true on the twist rate most are not exactly 1:9 but Ive never seen on a box of berger needed exactly 1:9 or 1:9.25 ext. it is a reference. the only way to know is to shoot them.
42 grs is max and yes start about 39 or 40 and work up. simple things like which primer and even diff brass can raise or lower pressures. not to mention temps.
as for "jamming" I have not seen the sticky on this Deff would be interesting. But I do know from personal experiences with VLDs that they like to touch or be into the lands a little. They are about all I shoot if i can. Just for the BC factor. as far as i know they have not changed VLDs to want to jump. But have created the Hybrids. That are a cross between a competition and hunting bullet that are to SAMI specs. these do like to be jumped a little and are more likely to go into the mag.
Also for a bullet pulling out when jammed and than extracted. This usually will happen with a competition shooter that is neck sizing using a neck tension die. They set the tension to 1 to 3 thou bullet tension depending on what the gun likes. some times it could be too light and the barrel will pull the bullet from the cartage. It is not uncommon for them to seat with extremely light tension, leave the bullet seated several thou out, then when the bolt is closed it pushes the bullet back into the case and is seated the same with every bullet chambered instead of sorting the bullets by Ojive measurements.
But now we are getting way off the original Question and way into details for a hunting bullet. So the suggestion is to try some and see what your gun likes. VLDs , Noslers, and hornady interlocks are all good performers on Deer size game. If you not planning on shooting past 400 the higher bc's are not gonna matter all that much. youll still make a kill shot with a light hold off.
Good luck and hopefully we're not confusing with all the technicals...
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  #24  
Old 03-15-2013, 05:55 PM
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Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

Ok, I had to search a bit once I got home tonight..

bulletin.accurateshooter.com/tag/vld/
This link has a video interview

Here is another
Berger Bullets Seating Method for VLD Bullets - A "Sweet Spot" with a Long Bullet Jump will give the best accuracy.

This is a reprint of the Berger method, with some "tuning" to differentiate between competition shooters and hunters. I agree that for hunting, having jammed bullets is not an ideal solution since more often than not, one has to unload after a hunt. Even if you recover it OK, what are you going to do with the cartridge that just had the bullet jammed into the lands ? The bullet will have marks on it from the rifling ?
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  #25  
Old 03-15-2013, 07:35 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Rapid city SD
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Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

the term jammed does not mean that you are putting the bullet way into the lands. your talking about 2 to three thou (the thickness of scotch tape) and thats not gonna affect the bullet much at all. For the most part you get more scratches from the loading ramp and from them scraping the edge of the chamber , especially exiting the opening of the action, Then from the marks made from the lands. these marks will be made to any bullet you eject from the gun. you don"t throw them away.
All and all if you are "JAMMING" the bullet far enough into the lands to make them pull out of your case, your doing some thing WAY WRONG. Either you do not have enough neck tension (using a neck bushing die) or you are seated way to far out.
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  #26  
Old 03-15-2013, 08:04 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Near Napoleon,MI
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Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

quote from referenced article:

" For years we encouraged shooters to use a base of cartridge to end of bearing surface OAL (I will use the term COAL to represent this dimension) which allows the VLD to touch the rifling or to be jammed in the rifling. This provided excellent results for many shooters but there were others who did not achieve top performance with the VLD jammed in their rifling. These shooters were left with the belief that the VLD bullets just won’t shoot in their rifle.

Other groups of shooters were discouraged by our recommendation to touch the rifling. Some of these shooters knew that at some point during a target competition they will be asked to remove a live round. With the bullet jammed in the rifling there was a good chance the bullet will stick in the barrel which could result in an action full of powder. This is hard on a shooter during a match."

This was first person from
Eric Stecker
Master Bulletsmith (Berger Bullets)
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  #27  
Old 03-15-2013, 09:27 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Rapid city SD
Posts: 34
Re: Need advice to pick a .243 bullet.

yes i do agree with him this does happen once again by comp shooters using low neck tension. and touching the lands or being into the lands is just a sugestion for what i've experianced and what freinds experiance. again all rifles and barrels are diff and you have to what combo your rifle likes. There is no bullet bible that can tell you exactly what will work and what will not. Take all the advice and play with it tell you find out what is working in your rifle.
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