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Free Floating Problem

 
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  #15  
Old 02-22-2011, 01:12 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

In addition to knowing the answer to this: "It makes more sense to me to bed and THEN remove the pressure point. Does that logic coincide with gunsmith reality?"

I am also curious to know about the value of bedding the recoil lug (and 2" forward) only, and NOT also bedding the action and tang.

Thanks!
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  #16  
Old 02-22-2011, 02:08 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by carbinero View Post
In addition to knowing the answer to this: "It makes more sense to me to bed and THEN remove the pressure point. Does that logic coincide with gunsmith reality?"

I am also curious to know about the value of bedding the recoil lug (and 2" forward) only, and NOT also bedding the action and tang.

Thanks!
Different smiths have different ways of bedding sometimes. I've seen the 2" forward bedded by some, and only under the action by others.??

I am assuming that they would remove the pressure point first, just so there is no upward stress on the action while they are trying to bed it. But that is only an assumption.
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  #17  
Old 02-22-2011, 02:36 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

From what I have studied, one should bed to the balance point of the barreled action, which on my varmint contour is about 2" forward of the recoil lug...especially if I don't bed the tang and action (!?)

On the pressure point question, if it is very little like 1/16- 1/8" (or could be sanded to that) then it seemed to me leaving it in for the bedding makes sense, since one should wrap the barrel in tape to center it for the free float anyhow, which leaving a tiny pressure point would basically do on the vertical axis anyhow. Logical?

ETA: I finally realized the error of my thinking on the pressure point: unless that point is sanded to merely sitting flush with with barrel, it is giving undesirable stress. I am still pondering the value of bedding only the recoil lug and forward, and how much less beneficial that is vs. the action and tang as well.

Last edited by carbinero; 02-22-2011 at 11:54 PM.
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  #18  
Old 02-22-2011, 02:40 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

Hopefully some of the smiths will chime in on this, I don't really know what is the best method. I've always had someone else do it............as long as it shot good and didn't change POI, I really never cared how it was done or why they did it that way. Maybe I should've asked more about it.
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Last edited by SBruce; 02-22-2011 at 02:43 PM.
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  #19  
Old 02-22-2011, 02:44 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

Without the action screws torqued, the pressure point is just a bump lifting the front of the barrel.

So, it should first be removed and then use taping as you say around the barrel or temporary bedding in the barrel channel with quickset to hold the barrel and action at the desired level while you bed the action.

I was taught to bed the whole action from just ahead of the reciever to the rear tang including the use of pillars to prevent compression from loosening the action screws over time.
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  #20  
Old 02-22-2011, 02:48 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

I should also confess that I am not a gun smith nor serious competitor. But, I have had good results on a few rifles that I did myself after considerable research.

I too am keen to hear from the experts.

thanks,
richard
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  #21  
Old 03-09-2011, 08:36 PM
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Re: Free Floating Problem

I have an "old School" reply for this particular condition. First of all, pressure beds (where upward pressure is applied to the Bbl at the stock forend) were often used to tame barrel harmonics and vibration. The risk with using this method is absorbtion of moisture in the stock and resulting movement of stock wood that adversely effects this bedding technique. If you have stabilized your wood stock with proper finishing inside and out and have a quarter sawn blank to begin with, you can get reasonable and long lasting results with a simple pressure bed system.

Back in the early 80s, I was a devoute fan of the .270 Win. and studied many rifle shooting articles appearing some 40-50s vintage American Rifleman magazines, some of which delt with this very issue. In an age before the technology that we now enjoy (and suffer from) shooters were getting amazing accuracy by balancing a forend tip pressure bed to find the "sweet spot". I was shooting a Ruger 77 with a good bedded action from the factory and my best hand loads would only produce 1.8 in. groups, floated barrel. I then took a day and spent it at the range in search of the right amount of pressure. Using target paper and stock finish, I found the pressure that worked, then finished my paper layers to preserve them against moisture.

The bed that I created applied 3 1/2 pounds of upward pressure on the barrel, creating the "sweet spot". Any less or any more pressure and groups opened up. At the right pressure, groups went immediately from 1.8 to between 3/8th and 1/2 in. at 100 yards and stayed there for the next ten years! I never experienced a shift of impact or other stock related accuracy problems with rifle in the entire time that I owned it. I was finally talked out of it by a young man who was looking for a good hunting rifle to start his hunting career out with.

Sporter weight barrels often benefit from a pressure bed at the forend. The pressure that brings accuracy can range from 1 to 7 pounds. The rifle will let you know when it's happy by shooting groups that will AMAZE you. Be patient and use good bench shooting technique when you attempt this process. Some folks will tell you that you are wasting your time and that this is not the "best" way to get accuracy... I still employ this method and it still works as well as it did back in the day.
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