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Dry Firing Jump

 
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  #8  
Old 04-26-2013, 02:44 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

Obviously the trigger doesn't touch the spring, however on a Jewell or any three lever trigger it takes a lot less force to drop the cocking piece, just a little snappier and a faster lock time not to mention a trigger in a whole different class. But since you're the resident wise *****, I mean guru by all means let us know why the springs look like a double and drag on the bolt body when they are cocked or released, also you cannot convince me that the spring dragging on the bolt body doesn't affect the striking force and lock time, resistance is resistance no matter how you look at it. Other brand factory actions and custom actions (especially the ones off a remington footprint) do not do this, so explain away professor.
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  #9  
Old 04-26-2013, 02:58 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

Quote:
Originally Posted by backwoods83 View Post
Obviously the trigger doesn't touch the spring, however on a Jewell or any three lever trigger it takes a lot less force to drop the cocking piece, just a little snappier and a faster lock time not to mention a trigger in a whole different class. But since you're the resident wise *****, I mean guru by all means let us know why the springs look like a double and drag on the bolt body when they are cocked or released, also you cannot convince me that the spring dragging on the bolt body doesn't affect the striking force and lock time, resistance is resistance no matter how you look at it. Other brand factory actions and custom actions (especially the ones off a remington footprint) do not do this, so explain away professor.
Well of course the spring sliding against the bolt body reduces lock time and softens impact. Probably 2 or 3 percent. Go measure yours then you'll know for sure. I don't care about mine. But I use heavier than factory spec springs anyway and they more than make up the difference as well as making primers perform more uniformly. And all springs on firing pins drag on something; no rifle action on this planet has "free floating" firing pin springs that do not touch either the pin or bolt body. To say nothing about the firing pin and/or its cocking piece dragging on its shroud or sear or even the bolt face around its hole; they ain't free floating either.

Do you know how much your springs weaken every year?
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  #10  
Old 04-26-2013, 03:13 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

The short answer, enough to justify buying a 10$ spring once a year, unless you have a Bat action and your a tight wad, of course 75$+ is a little pricey for a spring.
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  #11  
Old 04-26-2013, 03:50 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart B View Post
no trigger will change how the firing pin operates.
I may be taking this out of context, but on it's own this is incorrect.
Triggers change EVERYTHING about bolt timing, including much in OPs concern.
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  #12  
Old 04-26-2013, 05:11 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

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Originally Posted by Mikecr View Post
I may be taking this out of context, but on it's own this is incorrect.
Triggers change EVERYTHING about bolt timing, including much in OPs concern.
While a trigger may effect lock time a small amount, it's the firing pin impact on something (the bolt or its sleeve?) that causes virtually all of the scope's reticule jump that's seen by humans. At that time, the trigger has no effect on it whatsoever.

I don't think triggers have anything to do with the OP's concern.
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  #13  
Old 04-26-2013, 10:23 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

The firing pin is held back and released by the trigger.
Therefore, the trigger directly affects firing pin impact. It affects the amount of pin fall on release, as well as friction in this fall(as is solved by the Kelby replacement for Jewells with certain actions), and yes lock time for sure. Bolt TURN/POSITION is also affected, and you should mind the consistent stopping of bolt turn. Don't assume it.

If, with a given trigger(not model but actual), you have not set the pin strike for best grouping, you probably have not reached the best from your gun. I have whitnessed a perfectly firing mis-setting of a firing pin cause ugly performance. Flyers..

This is an area rarely looked at or discussed. I believe there is a lot to learn here.
Ever wonder why we're left to swap primers trial & error during load development? Why a primer that sucked for you works great for someone else in the same cartridge & load?
The answer is primer striking. Well actually, the ABSTRACT is primer striking..
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  #14  
Old 04-26-2013, 10:48 PM
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Re: Dry Firing Jump

I had a very similar problem with my 6br, Mike. I had to shorten the firing pin by .020" and use a PTG reduced power spring in a trued sa 700 with a Jewell trigger. Before I done this it would pop every 3rd or 4th primer and send a flyer, now it shoots 1/3moa at 600yards.
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