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dialing in long range game

 
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  #1  
Old 09-15-2003, 10:18 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Gainesville, FL
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dialing in long range game

I am going to CO as many of you are and this being my first time i have a few questions.

Fist of all what is th best way to dial in the ranges for elk. I have 300RUM with the Leopold Long range scope along with a range finder. Is there a crtain way I can just find the range, say 400 yards, and dial in the scope so it will be dead on?

Also, I know the accubonds are new, but would they be safe to use on elk?

And should I need a bi-pod for colorado and if so, which is the best?
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Old 09-15-2003, 10:35 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Richmond Va
Posts: 267
Re: dialing in long range game

I hope you still have a little time before you go or you will likely waste your money.

You need to know the exact trajectory of your chosen load over the entire range you expect to shoot. You don't get it from someone else, you find a chronograph and use ballistics software to project a path you you have witnessed for your gun with your loads.
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Old 09-15-2003, 02:35 PM
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Re: dialing in long range game

Maybe I was a little vauge with my question. I do have a rangefinder, I reload and I have a chronograph. I usually just sight my rifle in for 300 yards and If anything is out to 400, I hold a few inches over. I have only taken whitetail out to 400. So Elk is new for me. I just got this long range scop which is 6.5X20X50 so i was wondering if I could just dial it in instead of holding over. I have a software that tells all the ballistics.

What about that bipod?
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Old 09-15-2003, 03:45 PM
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Re: dialing in long range game

Smoak, you have software that gives your the theoretical ballistics. You need actual for the speed and bullet from YOUR gun.

Doing less would be like chartering a $1500 dollar offshore fishing daytrip and taking bargain lures and old rusty hooks.

Hold over is appropriate for two reasons I know of:

You need to shoot to fast to click and
Your scope is too cheap to stand the clicking all around!
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Old 09-15-2003, 04:13 PM
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Re: dialing in long range game

Okay, I have a neighbor with an open cow field. I can practice to about 700yards which I guess would be adequate.

WHICH BIPOD IS THE BEST???
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Old 09-15-2003, 04:57 PM
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Re: dialing in long range game

I have a harris bipod and I am happy with it. I think you will find a lot of people are happy with the harris.
As far as your scope adjustments, the least complicated thing would probably to be to just take your gun to your range and fire at the different distances and write down the scope settings at the different ranges that give you a correct bullet impact when you hold dead on.
The more complicated method involves using math and trajectories and stuff,you will find it in the "basics" section of this forum. But for the distances you are talking about I think shooting at targets every 100 yards and writing down your scope settings is a good way to go.
Take the information you get from your range experience(A drop chart) and put it on something convenient to take with you.
I tape my drop chart to the butt of my rifle with packing tape.That way I don't loose it. A drop chart and a rangefinder should serve your purposes just fine out to the distances you are talking about.
Remember,when you get to Colorado the altitude and temperature will effect your bullet flight and you will have to do some shooting out there to see what your new bullet impact is.You will have to adjust accordingly.The longer the distance the greater the difference in the new point of impact. The shorter the distance the less you will have to worry about it.
Good luck,wish I was going too.
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Old 09-15-2003, 05:05 PM
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Re: dialing in long range game

Edited.. post Frank45/70's post...he typed faster than I did I guess... Guess I said in a long winded method the exact same thing he said!....4 hours of typing wasted [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

smoak


Quick review of how to get your trajectory data.

First method... chronograph actual rounds...run a ballistics software and get the theoretical drop at desired ranges then calculate the necessary "come-up" for the desired shooting ranges...and lastly go out into the field and verify these "come-up" against actual targets while shooting from your "field" position(s).

Second method...get a BIG target backer... zero the rifle at 100 yards...move back to 200 yards and shoot at the target (center on the bull)...go to the target and measure the actual drop (in inches) for the group you just shot from 200 yards... divide this drop (in inches) by 2 (for 200 yards)... for example...we'll say the drop was 3 inches from the center of your aiming point to the center of your group...divide this by 2 to get 1.5 MOA (Minutes Of Angle approximately)...this is your 200 yard "come-up"... Now it get a little tricky unless you have a very large backer... Your scope elevation at this point should be sitting on the 100 yard zero setting (elevation turret reset to -0-)...add the 1.5 MOA to the 100 yard zero... you're now zeroed at 200 yards. Now move back to 300 yards and shoot another group...aim at the center of the bull...walk to the target and once again measure the drop (in inches) from your point of aim to the center of your group... divide this by 3 (for 300 yards). Your 200 yard to 300 yard "come-up" is this result... if your 300 yard group was 6 inches low...we divide by 3 to get MOA for 300 yards... the result is 2 MOA...this 2 MOA is an incremental value...in other words to get from 100 yards zero to 300 yard "come-up" you must add the 200 yard "come-up" (in our example 1.5 MOA) and the 300 yard come-up (in our example 2 MOA) to get 3.5 MOA up for a 300 yard data set. Repeat the scope setting procedure...set the scope for 300 yards (3.5 MOA up)..go back to 400 yards and shoot again (aim at the bull), measure the drop (in inches) and divide by????? right divide by 4 for 400 yards (MOA conversion). This new value is your 300 to 400 "come-up"....repeat this process until you get to the desired max range plus 100 yards or so (Murphy's law). Take this new data and attach it to your rifle or rifle scope. Once you get to your hunting location you should/must reconfirm this data as it'll change due to temperature, bullet, altitude, or a myriad of other things... don't verify at the close ranges and say good enough...do the far ranges...400 and 500 yards (or further if you plan to shoot much further) at a minimum...this will give you a feel for the degree of change.

Make sure you not only record the turret setting to elevation but also the vernier "rotation" mark from the turret tower. This little setting will enable you to double check that you're not a full revolution off when returning your scope to your 100 yard zero.

Remember to reset your scope to zero by going the correct direction...a common error is to rotate the turret the incorrect direction and end up 15 MOA too high.

This is a mind set and something that must become second nature...you're starting a little late but the good thing (I'd guess) is that you're starting.

Once you have your come-up for your rifle and load it's nearly a "chip-shot" (I love to irritate "hunters" with that term) to 500 yards (depending on wind). Adjust the scope to 500 yards, hold dead on and press the trigger nicely....blang! dead elk/deer/flying squirrel/coyote/rock/steel plate/etc,etc.

Best bipod for a hunter??? Harris of course! Which type Harris??? That's a problem...there are a lot of them and it'll be up to you to decide how tall, swivel, 2 extension, 3 extension, prone, sitting, etc. I get the LM series exclusively (but I'm a little "not right" so you better wait for someone else to answer before buying the LM version.

[ 09-15-2003: Message edited by: Dave King ]
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