Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics

Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics Applied Ballistics


Reply

Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #15  
Old 06-09-2013, 11:01 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Champaign, IL
Posts: 181
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BountyHunter View Post
If you are trying to reduce throat erosion, then melonite the barrel. Cost is $100 and way longer barrel life
I did a small amount of research concerning melonite on barrels. I thought I read something about using this process on stainless steel that might be a problem.
I know for fact when you begin mixing carbon with stainless steel it takes away the qualities of stainless steel. In the past, I've had a few lengthy conversation with metallurgists at Carpenter Steel. Carbon always induces magnetic qualities in stainless steel. Not to say it becomes magnet, but a magnet will be attracted to it. Carbon also can begin to reduce it's resistance to rust.
The description I read indicated the melonite process infuses nitrogen & carbon into the metal.
As a machine shop supervisor in a research facility at the University of Illinois, I learned there aren't very many surface treatments that don't add at least some thickness to a surface. I didn't look into this process long enough to know it that's true or not. I saved a couple of bookmarks to remind me to look into it more.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-09-2013, 11:37 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The rifle range, or archery range or behind the computer in Alaska
Posts: 3,591
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

FYI, magnets will stick to a stainless steel rifle barrel normally.
__________________
__________________
Long range shooting is a process that ends with a result. Once you start to focus on the result (how bad your last shot was, how big the group is going to be, what your buck will score, what your match score is, what place you are in...) then you loose the capacity to focus on the process.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-09-2013, 11:45 AM
SPONSOR
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: on the Southern Plains
Posts: 1,201
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

I first investigated the melonite/black nitride process because it was recommended by several bench rest shooters I know and trust. If it effected accuracy, they'd want nothing to do with it. S.S. barrels, in general, are made of 416R. It is already magnetic! As for corrosion,,, I've personally not seen it in any barrel I've had treated. Of course, I'm very diligent about cleaning after every shooting session, be it a single shot at a coyote or 60 at the range. After a year and a half of using barrels that have been treated, I have absolutely no complaints. It preforms as advertised. This subject has been explored, in depth, on this forum and several others in the past.
__________________
"Shoots real good!": definition; it didn't blow-up in my face. Not everything can be fixed on an internet forum!

Last edited by shortgrass; 06-09-2013 at 12:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-09-2013, 12:11 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Champaign, IL
Posts: 181
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Eichele View Post
FYI, magnets will stick to a stainless steel rifle barrel normally.
Thanks for the info, I didn't know that. All knowledge is useful.

In the area of research where I worked (University of IL), if it had carbon in it, it wasn't considered a true stainless steel. Some professors can get a little thin skinned if you question them about this. There's problems in "Electron Beam Microscopes" and stainless steel which has carbon in it. It causes an electron beam to stray places they don't want it to go.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-09-2013, 12:17 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Champaign, IL
Posts: 181
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by shortgrass View Post
I first investigated the melonite/black nitride process because it was recommended by several bench rest shooters I know and trust. If it effected accuracy, they'd want nothing to do with it. S.S. barrels, in general, are made of 416R. It is already magnetic! As for corrosion,,, I've personally not seen it in any barrel I've had treated. Of course, I'm vey diligent about cleaning after every shooting session, be it a single shot at a coyote or 60 at the range. After a year and a half of using barrels that have been treated, I have absolutely no complaints. It preforms as advertised. This subject has been explored, in depth, on this forum and several others in the past.
Thank you sir for your input. I'll put melonite on my list of things I want to research here on this website.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-09-2013, 12:26 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Carlsbad, NM
Posts: 157
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySes23 View Post
I know for fact when you begin mixing carbon with stainless steel it takes away the qualities of stainless steel. In the past, I've had a few lengthy conversation with metallurgists at Carpenter Steel. Carbon always induces magnetic qualities in stainless steel. Not to say it becomes magnet, but a magnet will be attracted to it. Carbon also can begin to reduce it's resistance to rust.
The description I read indicated the melonite process infuses nitrogen & carbon into the metal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Eichele View Post
FYI, magnets will stick to a stainless steel rifle barrel normally.
There are many types/grades of stainless steel. Broadly (very) speaking they can be divided into types based on what sort of crystal the iron in them forms, austenitic or ferritic. Austenite forms in plain iron at high temperatures, but is stabilized in low (read normal) temps in certain stainless steels, it is non-magnetic. Ferrite is the crystal form in room temperature iron, and certain other stainless steels, it is magnetic. Rifle barrels are typically made from a ferritic stainless steel, stuff like stainless steel food service equipment is typically made from austenitic stainless.

Infusing carbon into an austenitic stainless steel can cause a phase change into ferrite. Infusing carbon into a ferritic stainless steel will not (it's already ferrite). Infusing carbon into any stainless steel can cause the chromium in solid solution to precipitate out into chromium carbide crystals, depending on the temperature that the process is carried out at. Precipitating out the chromium will decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. The nitrogen infused in the ferritic nitrocarburization process will increase the corrosion resistance of the steel.

Net result is (typically), for a Melonited stainless barrel, better corrosion resistance than carbon steel, less than some grades of stainless.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-09-2013, 12:29 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The rifle range, or archery range or behind the computer in Alaska
Posts: 3,591
Re: Decrease throat erosion with longer barrels?

I'm not 100% sure so please don't hang me if I'm wrong but I do believe there is a small amount of carbon in 416r SS and quite a bit of chromium. I've heard that true SS is softer than other steels but its the addition of chromium that makes 416r harder.

What I do know is that 416r SS barrels DO rust. Not nearly to the degree other steels and dont pit as bad. Rust also clean off much easier. But good SS does rust and has magnetic properties.
__________________
__________________
Long range shooting is a process that ends with a result. Once you start to focus on the result (how bad your last shot was, how big the group is going to be, what your buck will score, what your match score is, what place you are in...) then you loose the capacity to focus on the process.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC