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Custom Advice

 
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  #8  
Old 12-31-2004, 06:58 PM
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Re: Custom Advice

No, I have not. I have come to the conclusion that if I am going to get a 358 and run 250-300gr bullets in it, taking into acount what you had to say about sectional density, and just shoot moose and bear then the STA would be a real killer and it would shoot flat at that. I really haven't given a 358 RUM any thought because I have a pile of 375 H&H brass. Although fire forming every case doesn't sound all that economical or fun, and buying STA brass from someone like A-Square can't be all that cheep either. What would you have to do to the RUM to make it a 358, just neck it up? If that's the case that sounds alot better. I can really see the benefits of a 338, the decision would be alot easier if I hadn't spent the last 5 yrs wanting a 358 STA. I've also wanted a tacticle type rifle that was made just for shooting very long distances, something that I wasn't worried about weight on; a 7mm of some kind. So I don't know how much I want to base this gun around shooting off of a bench. I'm not sure if I want to be doing a lot of adjusting to the scope on a gun used for hunting; because of different loads, bullets and shooting distances that is. How bad is the Rum brass to buy? If the Rum was necked up to 358 it would then probably be slower than both the 338 RUM and the 358 STA, and that is one of the things I liked about it. There's not a lot of cartridges that shoot a 250 gr bullet flatter except for the 338-378 and some fancy stuff.
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  #9  
Old 01-01-2005, 08:27 AM
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Re: Custom Advice

Radunn,

Really all you would need for a 358 RUM is a magnum bolt face Rem 700, an RUM action would be the easiest but any mag or full length would do for that matter.

A new Mag box would be needed if not a RUM action and a little work on the feed rails again if not a RUM.

Of course the reamer would need to be made.

As far as brass goes, I would go with a 358-375 RUM is you will because of the longer case. .358" bullets are not overly long so you would have a bit more case capacity with the longer 375 RUM case.

Midway lists 375 RUM brass at $46.11 per 100 so it is very affordable for the performance you get.

A 358 RUM does have some disadvantages, namely having the reamer built and getting dies, would be spendier then the 358 STA which is a custom listed die with most makers.

Performance wise, in a 26" barrel, all the RUM calibers on teh full length case will run within 100 fps of the much larger 378 Wby class cases.

What ever the STA would produce, add another 100 to 150 fps onto that for a given bullet weight and barrel length.

Good Shooting!!

Kirby Allen(50)
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Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
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  #10  
Old 01-01-2005, 10:47 AM
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Re: Custom Advice

Kirby,
That's interesting. What do you think the difference in price would be between the STA reemer and having one made for a 358 RUM? Most people have wanted me to buy the reemer anyway. What do custom dies generaly cost? How would you go about working up reloading data for a cartridge like that? So someone can have about any cartridge they want, all they have to do is have a reemer and dies made? You still have me thinking heavily on the accuracy and different options of the 338 bullets.
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  #11  
Old 01-01-2005, 11:34 AM
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Re: Custom Advice

Radunn,

If you can think it, it can be built, within reason of course.

Reamers are not to bad. A full blown custom reamer from JGS, the only reamer I use, would run in the $200 dollar range including shipping. I cover 1/2 the cost of a custom reamer to help out my customers as well as add to my inventory of reamers.

Redding does not list the 358 RUM on their custom list of rounds but if you went with the standard case configuration of the RUM with the caliber being the only difference I would not think there would be any additional tooling costs.

Dies would probably be in the $100 to $120 range just guessing.

Basically one could use top end load data forthe 358 STA for starting loads for the 358 RUM and work up from there looking for the usual pressure signs.

Accuracy wise, the 338 family of bullets is vastly superior to the 358 for true match quality or extreme range shooting. For traditional big game hunting ranges, 400 yards or so, you will not see a huge difference between the two. There is just a much larger selection of bullets for the 338.

For an easy to build, easy to load for heavy hitter that will serve you well at 10 yards or as far as you choose to shoot, the 338 RUM would be hard to beat. Just measured the case volume difference between the 338 RUM and the 338 Lapua, its 3 grains difference only, nothing really at all.

It is a serious howerhouse that can be loaded up to higher levels then Rem loads their factory ammo to. 2850 fps with a 250 gr pill in a 26" barrel is a pretty mild load.

Good Shooting!!!

Kirby Allen(50)
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Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2005, 12:39 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2004
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Re: Custom Advice

Kirby,
Do you have the difference in case capacity between the 358 STA and the 375 RUM?
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  #13  
Old 01-01-2005, 01:37 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2004
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Re: Custom Advice

Kirby,
Are there any disadvantages to having teflon installed on a rifle? The advantages being weather resistance, non glare,and I've also heard it makes the action smoother. There must be different methods to this, I've seen guns that have had this done and look like hell and then those that don't look so bad. Is there much point in doing this to a stainless gun that has a non glare finish?
What are the advantages to a 3 position safety?
I've heard rumors of a gel recoil pad, is there such a thing?
Is a blind magazine hard to clean or keep clean and do they make a noticable difference in accuracy?
Do the mercury style recoil reducers work well and how much weight do they add to the gun?
It seems a lot of people are unhappy with the extractor in the remington 700; adding sako extractors and m-16 extractors. What would you recomend.
Thank you for your help with this stuff.
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  #14  
Old 01-01-2005, 02:36 PM
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Re: Custom Advice

Radunn,

I do not have the exact capacities but hte RUM case has roughly 15% more case capacity then the standard belted magnum case. Pretty much splits the difference between the standard belted magnum like the 358 STA and the big Wby class cases.

I am not a huge fan of the topical metal surface finishes but there are many out there that swear by them. I guess that I am a bit more traditional wanting to see the metal in the rifle.

I will say that they will be a bit more weather resistant at least as long as the finish does not wear through. In my opinion the greatest advantage is low visibility but in typical hunting situations this is hardly a concern. I do not see a great need for these finishes on a big game rifle but there are others that do so take that for what you will, personal preference I suppose.

As far as making an action smoother, I do not know. I properly polished action is pretty damn smooth so is it better to teflon coat, in this aspect if the rifle is properly polished up, I do not see much advantage.

Teflon does reduce friction but it also wears faster then properly polished and lubed metal to metal contact. Again, personal preference and I do not see the need in a big game rifle.

The best feature about the 3 position safeties is that they positively lock the striker assembly in the bolt as well as the bolt handle down in the fully rear position.

While Rem triggers have gotten a bad rapp over the years, a properly adjusted Rem 700 safety is very secure and safe. If you are relying on your safety to keep a loaded rifle from discaharging under extreme use you are asking for trouble.

A rifle should be loaded when its ready to be fired and unloaded , at least an empty chamber all other times. While a three position safety is very useful it is not foolproof by any means.

Like any safety, if fitted incorrectly, they are very dangerous. Fitted correctly, like any modern safety, they are quite safe and reliable.

I do not know of any "gel" recoil pad. I use kick Eez pads and they are about as soft as I have seen. They do absord alot of recoil energy on heavy recoiling rifles, very nice pad.

I do not find Blind Mags all that hard to keep clean but I take pretty good care of my gear in the field. I have never seen a problem with these mags.

In a varmint or target style rifle, you will see an increase in stability and consistancy with a stock designed with a solid bottom blind mag.

In a heavy recoiling big game rifle, the difference in accuracy will probably not be as great as the increase in strength in the stock. Solid bottom stocks are vastly more rigid then an open bottom design. Rarely will you see a blind mag stock crack that has been fitted properly to start with.

With open bottom stocks and heavy recoiling rifles, this is not always the case simple because of the stock walls bowing between the action screws under the strains of recoil.

Mercury reducers do work but I feel they work as much by jus the added weight as anything. The best dampener of recoil besides a muzzle brake is weight.

These systems will vary from a few ounces to 1/2 a pound or so depending on model.

I certainly like to check out and test a Rem 700 extractor before I send them to a customer. A properly fitted Rem 700 extractor will perform very well with total reliablility with safe loads.

The Sako and M-16 extractors do offer a larger "bite" on the case rim for added support but each have their disadvantages as well. If there is a problem with the factory extractor then it is time to replace it and either of those mentioned will work. The M-16 design is perhaps the most secure as it is pinned in place but a tightly fitted Sako extractor is also very reliable and safe.

Good Shooting!!!

Kirby Allen(50)
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
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