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Chambering / reloading question

 
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  #1  
Old 05-01-2014, 01:27 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 185
Chambering / reloading question

I have a 30-06 on order - chosen b/c I don't reload, it is versatile, and ammo is readily available with a large bullet selection.

I am now thinking of changing my order (I am 6 months or so in on an order from Darrell Holland) to 280 rem or 280 AI...not sure that I can change it, but if possible, I am considering it.

This is NOT a question of which chambering I should get - 30-06, 280 AI, etc. The question I have is this....

When my rifle is finished, I am going to have someone develop a load for it, even if it is a 30-06. Factory ammo will be a backup in a pinch. If I have someone develop the load, and I buy reloading equipment, is there any reason I can't use his recipe and have a fairly easy entry into reloading? Not saying reloading isn't a skill, only that if I start out with a known recipe, and I get the right equipment, shouldn't I be able to learn the basics enough to get started and make that recipe for my gun?

That would allow me to choose a chambering that I want and not have to be bound by factory ammo. For instance, I could go 280 AI and just do it myself after the load is developed. Over time, I could get more advanced and develop my own loads, test various loads or try new bullets.

Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2014, 04:07 PM
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Location: Washington State
Posts: 458
Re: Chambering / reloading question

Reloading recipes are like cake recipes, if it works for you it works for me. If anything there might be a little variation in the cakes (some people just put a touch more "lovin'" in).

That's why the reloading manuals are out there. What the manufactures put together can be duplicated by their customers- us. If a friend develops a load, their data is what you should use.

Why are you not starting out reloading? Costs? My advice: buy the equipment and have your friend help you get into reloading. I do this for my friends and the learning curve is steep. They save a ton of $ in components by not making mistakes. Two older gentlemen, George Forsythe and Major Jim Van (Retired Army Aircorp and post WW II AMU) took a snot nosed punk under wing and set me on a most enjoyable pastime and hobby I will pursue until I die. It is the smallest of efforts I can make to repay those two by helping others get started. I am forever in their debt.

KB
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  #3  
Old 05-01-2014, 04:33 PM
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Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 141
Re: Chambering / reloading question

Just jumping into reloading using another shooter's recipe is never a good idea. Different guns react differently to similar loads. Your friend's load may work fine in his gun and blow yours to bits. Not likely, but you are better off buying a few reloading manuals published by powder and bullet makers and starting with their loads. They will give you a minimum and maximum loads. Start with the minimum and work your way up to a load that performs well in your rifle. That is the fun of reloading...finding that exact formula that performs in your rifle, and you may be surprised at the differences in group sizes created by adding or subtracting a half a grain of powder. Rifles are curious things to say the least. I have three .300 Win mags, a Remington Sendero, a Tikka T-3, and an Encore. The Encore won't shoot anything accurately even after I had the custom forearm hangar system put on it. The Tikka shoots under an inch with a number of loads, but can be fussy, the Sendero is like magic. I took it to the range with a box of what was essentially garbage. 20 cartridges, no two alike. Different brass, primers, powders, seating depths, etc. The only consistency was the bullet. They were all loaded with Nosler Ballistic Tips. They were all leftovers from past experiments and I wanted to reuse some of the brass so I decided to shoot them. I put my target out at 200yards, fired an fouling shot, and settled in to shoot the rest. I am not bragging about my shooting here, I am average at best, but I will admit to bragging about the rifle. I fired the first shot and located the hole through the scope. The target was mounted on a very large piece of cardboard so I could track every shot including any fliers. I fired the second shot, and could not find the hole anywhere. I fired the third shot, and again could not find another hole. I, and a number of regulars at the range, all looked it over and could only come to the conclusion that all three shots went directly through the same hole. Then came the hard-assing...bet you can't do that again, etc., all in fun, of course. So I took up the challenge and aiming at a different spot fired the first shot and saw the hole. I fired the second shot, and things got kind of quiet because there was no second hole. By his time I had a bad case of the "yips", and even with the rifle solidly bedded in a lead sled, I could not hold that thing still to fire the third shot. I finally did, and the third shot went into the same hole, but .07 low. Disappointed as I was that it just missed, I was gratified that the third shot proved that the first group was a one hole group, and the second group was damned close. I still have that target. The whole point of this long story is , buy the rifle, go to Cabelas and get an advanced reloader's kit (might as well get the advanced since you will end up buying all the other stuff anyway), buy good brass to start with. Everyone has their favorite, mine happens to be Nosler because they come all sorted by weight, trimmed to length, and are ready to load. Lapua is also excellent brass. When you buy your dies, make sure you get a neck sizer included. The manuals will recommend different powders and you should try them all. Same with primers, although 99/100 guys use Federals. Do everything very slowly and make sure your loading room is very well lit. I could tell you another very long story where I was working on a shotgun that would not cycle. I checked the chamber and pulled the trigger. I pulled the bolt back and an unfired shell came out. The shell fired outside the house, divine intervention is my only explanation. I know the next day I went to Home Depot and installed so many lights in my gun room that you have to wear sunglasses. As to caliber, I would stick with your initial plan of the 30-06. It was the cartridge of the 20th Century for a reason. They generally are not fussy, using a 150 grain bullet you can get velocities over 3000 for deer, and you can load up to 220 grain bullets for bear. I have the others you mentioned, and they are good calibers and have their advantages, but the tried and true 30-06 is hard to beat. Have fun!
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  #4  
Old 05-01-2014, 04:49 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: One of the Commonwealth's
Posts: 221
Re: Chambering / reloading question

I walked into a gun shop looking for a 300 win mag. The shop carries higher end guns like HS Presion, Dakota , Cooper and so on. I'm looking at the hs new in the rack. Guy walks in and puts a rifle case on the counter. Opens it up and says I'm trading this hs 300 wm on a RUM. I looked the rifle over. He had the shop do a load work up a few months earlier at the cost of 500! He still had their custom loaded ammo and load data to include the targets. I immediately bought the rifle. I've been loading for 15 years. I came home and used their data to shoot 1/2 moa. I then tinkered with bullet seating depth and did a little better. Get a 280ai, have someone do the load development with your rifle. Once you start reloading and you recreate that load and then harvest an animal you will be hooked.
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  #5  
Old 05-01-2014, 05:22 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 185
Re: Chambering / reloading question

Let me clarify - I will get a load developed specifically for (and only for) my rifle. When the rifle is finished, Darrell has someone that will develop a load for that rifle if the customer wants, at a fee of course.

So when the rifle is done, I will pay this guy, who is recommended by Darrell Holland, to develop a load specifically for my rifle.

I may then start reloading and load to those specs....
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  #6  
Old 05-01-2014, 05:32 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: One of the Commonwealth's
Posts: 221
Re: Chambering / reloading question

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Oregonian View Post
Let me clarify - I will get a load developed specifically for (and only for) my rifle. When the rifle is finished, Darrell has someone that will develop a load for that rifle if the customer wants, at a fee of course.

So when the rifle is done, I will pay this guy, who is recommended by Darrell Holland, to develop a load specifically for my rifle.

I may then start reloading and load to those specs....
I knew what you ment. Sometimes when I'm fighting to develop a new load I think about paying some one to do it. It can get down right nerve racking... Becoming a member of this forum has helped tremendously. If you do a 280ai find the info on here and the web about the ackley 280 and the nosler version. That will dive you mad! Good luck
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  #7  
Old 05-01-2014, 05:35 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 185
Re: Chambering / reloading question

Quote:
Originally Posted by rharfo View Post
I knew what you ment. Sometimes when I'm fighting to develop a new load I think about paying some one to do it. It can get down right nerve racking... Becoming a member of this forum has helped tremendously. If you do a 280ai find the info on here and the web about the ackley 280 and the nosler version. That will dive you mad! Good luck
Yep - that already has me a little gun shy (pardon the pun) on a 280AI...can get downright confusing, and can lead to more confusion down the road unless I fireform my own brass from 280 rem.
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