Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics


Reply

Blueprinting action

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #8  
Old 09-26-2012, 03:22 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Gillette, WY
Posts: 2,613
Re: Blueprinting action

I thought this was an exceptional blerb from a well respected 'smith in my neck o' the woods:

"Since you asked and since I had this very conversation yesterday I'll answer it based on my experience.

I'm a car guy and a dragster fag in particular so I'll use it as an analogy.

If we go Pro Stock Drag Racing and want to be competitive we can't show up at a race with anything less than a normally aspirated 500cid engine making right around 1350hp. It don't matter how many .401 lights you cut, you won't win.

If you spend lots of time and money fussing and such you might find an extra 15-20hp that other guys don't have. In the world the rest of us live in 15-20hp isn't even worth mentioning. We'll never appreciate it in a street car and 99% of us aren't capable of putting it to the pavement anyway even if we did have it.

However, if your back in the pro stock car and your racing someone like Warren Johnson's kid then 15-20hp is a zip code of advantage.

Much is the same with precision rifle building, but it comes in two folds. Actual real world performance and the perceived gain/confidence boost it gives you as a shooter.


First you have to find that 1350hp. That starts with a premium grade barrel. All the action truing in the world won't fix a lemon. Neither will bedding, trigger jobs, optics, yada, yada.

All of those items fall into that 15-20hp category.

Action and bedding work make a great gun exceptional, but the gain is small and its expensive.

Next is the perceived value and the confidence it inspires in you as you pull the trigger. If you have the mindset that only an accurized receiver fitted with a great barrel will deliver the performance you must have, then that's all that will satisfy the bill. Anything less and your going to wonder/doubt your equipment when/if (WHEN) a shot comes up that isn't on call.

SO, receiver work is worth it if it's worth it to YOU. It's also worth it if your the caliber of shooter that averages in the HighMaster classification rating. (97% or better-not easy to do/maintain)

Hope this helped, but I fear it'll just put more doubts in your head. It's the truth though!

Please know that I don't say this as a shooter who's owned a dozen or so custom guns built by various marquee shops all over the US. My comments come from building a few hundred of these kinds of guns over 14 years in a variety of flavors for folks all over the world. It's just what I have observed over the years and my opinions/thoughts/findings are consistent with other builders who've been doing it as long/longer than I have.

C."
__________________
"I, however, view ethics as an individual decision. My ethics are mine - and I won't explain or justify them to anyone else. I seek nobody's approval, just that of my own conscience. "

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-26-2012, 03:43 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 819
Re: Blueprinting action

I agree with what he said Outlaw. If your shooting competitively or you only build a few custom rifles in your lifetime then by all means go all out. I do my own work and build quite a few rifles a year so it's only for my benefit or lack thereof. I've had more accurate rifles with untrued receivers than with trued receivers so like I said before I believe the barrel is by far the most important part with the installation a close second. I'm not sure the average person could measure the gain from truing a receiver unless it was over the course of lots of rounds and targets. It would be a interesting test to chamber a barrel on a untrued receiver and shoot a couple hundred rounds for groups and then set it back and true the receiver to see the gain. Granted there will be a slight gain by shortening the barrel just due to the increased stiffness.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-26-2012, 03:49 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Gillette, WY
Posts: 2,613
Re: Blueprinting action

Quote:
Originally Posted by IdahoCTD View Post
I agree with what he said Outlaw. If your shooting competitively or you only build a few custom rifles in your lifetime then by all means go all out. I do my own work and build quite a few rifles a year so it's only for my benefit or lack thereof. I've had more accurate rifles with untrued receivers than with trued receivers so like I said before I believe the barrel is by far the most important part with the installation a close second. I'm not sure the average person could measure the gain from truing a receiver unless it was over the course of lots of rounds and targets. It would be a interesting test to chamber a barrel on a untrued receiver and shoot a couple hundred rounds for groups and then set it back and true the receiver to see the gain. Granted there will be a slight gain by shortening the barrel just due to the increased stiffness.

I saw it as a great presentation in analogy. Something that everyone, seasoned shooter or first timer, can understand. I can say that every custom rifle i've build (non custom action) has been trued. Do they shoot? yup. Would they have shot w/o truing? Probably so. When I'm dumping a couple (or several) grand into a custom, a couple hundred bucks isn't going to sway my decision one way or the other..... Or maybe it has.... after moving to custom actions, I don't see any 700 based customs in the future. After all, buying the 700 & truing it is closing in on the cost of some custom actions...


t
__________________
"I, however, view ethics as an individual decision. My ethics are mine - and I won't explain or justify them to anyone else. I seek nobody's approval, just that of my own conscience. "

Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-26-2012, 05:23 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 1,892
Re: Blueprinting action

Contact these guys in Oregon...Action Works [nwactionworks@gmail.com]

They have Rem 700 actions already blueprinted...ready to go and they are
$570 shipped for blued and $615 shipped for SST.

I had my 25-06AI built on one of their actions and I'll go right back to them in the spring when I start my next rifle
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-27-2012, 06:32 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,114
Re: Blueprinting action

Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlaw6.0 View Post
SO, receiver work is worth it if it's worth it to YOU. It's also worth it if your the caliber of shooter that averages in the HighMaster classification rating. (97% or better-not easy to do/maintain)
My comments on truing Rem's and Win's are what the high masters did years ago before tube guns became the norm in high power competition. I have a High Master high power card in my billfold. Virtually all of the HM's preferred Winchester receivers as they are much stiffer than the Remingtons as well as having other features that are better than the Remington ones.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Blueprinting action
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
blueprinting 700 action bamadawg2009 Gunsmithing 7 07-22-2012 08:11 PM
Blueprinting a Remingotn Action Video by MCR Kevin Cram Videos Of Tech Stuff And Reviews 17 11-27-2011 11:52 PM
Blueprinting a Remingotn Action Video by MCR Kevin Cram Long Range Hunting & Shooting 19 02-10-2011 06:27 PM
Action blueprinting?? jgss2 Long Range Hunting & Shooting 12 02-09-2011 08:49 PM
action blueprinting? huntinfool18 Gunsmithing 15 08-13-2007 08:22 PM

Current Poll
Do you archery hunt for elk?
YES - 32.12%
62 Votes
NO - 52.33%
101 Votes
Not yet, but I plan to. - 15.54%
30 Votes
Total Votes: 193
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC