Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics


Reply

Berger 210 VLD on Black Bear - Field Report

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #36  
Old 06-26-2008, 04:58 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Alaska
Posts: 3,227
Kirby,

Thanks for contributing and I would agree with your comments.

This bear was the first kill with your APS 300WM. How I ended up in the alders with the bear 6-8 yards away is a longer story involving me slamming on the brakes to avoid killing a large cow moose with my SUV which caused my new rifle to roll onto the floorboard and jar the scope enough to alter the scope's zero enough to miss the vitals at 425 yds. Otherwise my bear would have been toast on the first shot.

Anyhow..., as such things go, before I know it I'm in the alders trailing the bear in fading light. 1 1/2 hours later after sneaking 150 yds through the thick stuff I find my way to its bed, which ended up being about three jumps in front of my nose in the thick stuff. As I was moving my head around trying to get a better look at the black fur in front of my face I finally made out the head of the bear and she was doing the same thing I was... bobbing her head around trying to get a better look at me through the brush. A little unnerving to say the least. I didn't intend to test the 210 Berger VLD at such close range, but those were the the cards I was dealt on this particular hunt. Certainly an unusually close range finishing shot and I thought others would be interested in the point blank range performance of the 30 cal 210 Berger VLD. The reason I didn't comment on the performance of the initial shot at 425 yds was because that errant shot hit the bear in the jaw and lower throat area, and wasn't a solid enough hit to be worthy of discussion. Several days later I confirmed the rifle's zero was off in the direction that resulted in the jaw shot bear, and I had to re-zero the scope.

By the way, this APS rifle will shoot less than 1/2 moa easy to at least 600 yds with these 210 VLDs. Still getting familiar with the gun and its potential with these Bergers and some other bullets.

Paul

Last edited by phorwath; 06-26-2008 at 06:18 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 06-26-2008, 08:08 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Townsend, Montana.
Posts: 7,620
Holy Crap Paul. Great story, thanks for sharing your adventure! wow!

Congrats on the Bear and a great story to go with it.

Jeff
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 06-26-2008, 09:51 AM
Lightvarmint
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by phorwath View Post
Kirby,

Thanks for contributing and I would agree with your comments.

This bear was the first kill with your APS 300WM. How I ended up in the alders with the bear 6-8 yards away is a longer story involving me slamming on the brakes to avoid killing a large cow moose with my SUV which caused my new rifle to roll onto the floorboard and jar the scope enough to alter the scope's zero enough to miss the vitals at 425 yds. Otherwise my bear would have been toast on the first shot.

Anyhow..., as such things go, before I know it I'm in the alders trailing the bear in fading light. 1 1/2 hours later after sneaking 150 yds through the thick stuff I find my way to its bed, which ended up being about three jumps in front of my nose in the thick stuff. As I was moving my head around try to get a better look at the black fur in front of my face I finally made out the head of the bear and she was doing the same thing I was... bobbing her head around trying to get a better look at me through the brush. A little unnerving to say the least. I didn't intend to test the 210 Berger VLD at such close range, but those were the the cards I was dealt on this particular hunt. Certainly an unusually close range finishing shot and I thought others would be interested in the point blank range performance of the 30 cal 210 Berger VLD. The reason I didn't comment on the performance of the initial shot at 425 yds was because that errant shot hit the bear in the jaw and lower throat area, and wasn't a solid enough hit to be worthy of discussion. Several days later I confirmed the rifles zero was off in the direction that resulted in the jaw shot bear, and I had to re-zero the scope.

By the way, this APS rifle will shoot less than 1/2 moa easy to at least 600 yds with these 210 VLDs. Still getting familiar with the gun and its potential with these Bergers and some other bullets.

Paul
Paul,

Did the shot to the jaw knock the bear woozy or even unconcious for a perior of time? The reason I ask is because I was shooting a buck one year while in a soybean field and he had a horse fly annoying him. When he (buck) stopped walking, I slowly squeezed the trigger of the Steyr SSG .308 and at the time of trigger break, the buck had slung his head around to knock the fly off his side. Crack wen the rifle and down went the buck. I was very proud of the 300 yard off-hand sitting shot until first one leg kicked and then another and then all four and it looked as though he was getting up.

Knowing that I had a good hold and had made the shot that I aimed, I did not shooter another. I then quickly clicked my tree climber down the tree and then jumped off the last few feet of elevation. I then ran full blast (perpendicular to the planted rows of course) over to the deer. When I got there, all I could see were the whites of his eyes and he was severly agitated. I did notice that I did not see any blood and that he had torn up a 10' x 10' area of beans in his attempts to right himself.

So, since there was not any blood or obvious wound, I had to either (a) slit the throat or (b) coupe de gras a shot into the neck. Well being a strapping 30- something, I decided to Rambo it with the knife...... Bad choice, he threw me over into the beans and got dirt all over and into my prized rifle. I then pulled out the bolt and beat the barrel on the side of my leg to get the compacted dirt out and then cleaned it the rest of the way by inserting some soybean stems to get the grit out. When that was done, needless to say he got to meet another Mr. Nosler Ballistic tip.

After I recovered myself and got all the dirt off and looked around to ensure no one saw me get by butt whipped, I examined the deer. What I found was the point of impact of the first bullet. As the deer licked himself to shoo the fly, the junction of his G1 and the main beam eclipsed my aiming point and intercepted the bullet. He was first knocked out and then went completely foolish after he was out cold for a short period of time.

I am glad you did not make the mistakes that I did if you had gotten up on him in an unconcious state without a mortal wound.

Another story on lack of bullet performance.... In 2004, I was testing and experimenting the the Lost River Bullets and they shot like laser beams. I thought I had found the "holy grail" of bullets.

Well, to make a long story short, three pass-throughs without recovering the game expeditiously and even with a minor blood trail from each, I decided to give the LR bullets one more try. I was sitting up in the 26' elevated 8' x 8' covered shooting platform and a buck walked out at exactly 400 yards. I took careful aim at his neck and launched the shot. The buck kareened over backwards and fell into the ditch. I called the next name on the venison list and told him to come pick up his deer. I then egressed the shooting nest and meandered down to the "certain kill". What I found was a little hair and a few drops of blood............. NO DEER. The next morning I and the team of searchers looked high and low for the beast and did not find anything at all. We felt sick about it and canned the idea of ever using the LR bullets again. We switched to accubonds and then proceeded onto Colorado for our unsuccessul Elk/mule deer hunt.

Two days after we returned (6 weeks from the time I shot the deer), I was getting ready to check the zero on the rifle before departing to Missouri on another hunt. I was just getting ready to climb down and put up targets when a buck started walking towards me at about 800 yards. When he go to the 400 yard point, he turned broadside and I checked the zero on his lungs. I got the deer and we examined closely and noticed a wound in the neck area. Yes, it was the same buck and he had a healed up wound in his neck. He escaped the LR but succumed to the Accubond. So, complete penetration is not always the best situation. The accubond fractured on the entrance (on a rib) but did not exit. Muzzle velocity was right at 3400 FPS with the 180 grain accubond.

James
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 06-26-2008, 04:40 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Alaska
Posts: 3,227
James,

Thanks for your interesting hunting stories. I've heard more than one account of Alaskan moose being struck in the palm or antler with a bullet and being temporarily knocked out, only to get back up and take off like a freight train. I shot a 1 1/4 curl Dall ram up here about 10 years ago and there was an old bullet hole through and through one of its horns from a prior hunter. Didn't blow the horn off, just augered a hole through the horn about the diameter of a 270 - 280. I always wondered how that ram reacted to that hit. He couldn't have stuck around too long cuz he was still alive and healthy when I bumped into him more than one year later.

The shot to the jaw did roll this bear several times downslope but she rolled out of view after about the 2nd barrel roll and I never did see her again after that until tracking her to her death bed. From the sign I saw it looked like she regained her footing after maybe three or four rolls, after which she headed into the alders for cover. I don't think the shot in the jaw knocked the bear out or even knocked it silly, but I'm sure she had one heck of a tooth ache in the molar area. Gives me tooth pain just thinking about it. The bullet continued into the lower neck and must have damaged a jugular vein because the bear was fairly weak from blood loss 1 1/2 hours later.

Even through my custom molded-in-place ear plugs I could hear what sounded like the cracking of bone. I thought I was hearing a front leg bone being struck since the bear was quartering toward me. Didn't realize I'd hit her in the jaw until after I finished her off in the alders. At that point I remembered my near miss with the moose and I pretty much knew my rifle scope had to have been knocked out of zero, since I had a really, really good rest and bead on the bear when the gun discharged. Sure enough, that later was proven to be the case.

Paul

Last edited by phorwath; 06-26-2008 at 06:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 06-26-2008, 09:52 PM
Lightvarmint
 
Posts: n/a
Paul,

If I may, I recommend to all the folks who travel with me on our hunting excursions to have two scopes or just take two rifles tuned and ready. One installed and another zeroed on the rifle and ready to install but tucked away for safe keeping. It may take a few clicks to get it dead nuts, but it sure beats the alternative.

Just for the record, the 180s you are getting will have a jacket that is significantly thicker than what I think the Bergers are in the 210.

James

Last edited by Lightvarmint; 06-26-2008 at 09:54 PM. Reason: additional information
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 06-26-2008, 10:08 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Alaska
Posts: 3,227
Yep - I hear that, and nothing at all wrong with that recommendation James.

I would have tested the rifle but this was a one day hunt and I was hunting in a National Wildlife Refuge where it is legal to hunt, but illegal to target shoot - if you can believe that.

I also had my rifle wrapped in a wool blanket while travelling in the SUV for additional protection and really didn't think it landed hard enough to knock the scope's zero off. Several years ago I converted all my rifle scope bases and mounts to rather expensive and rugged tactical Picatinny-style bases and rings in the effort to avoid this very situation. Even upgraded my scopes. In this case, a 3-18X IOR scope with 35mm main tube for the extra rigidity and strength. And I still got bit in the butt...
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 06-27-2008, 08:04 AM
Lightvarmint
 
Posts: n/a
Paul,

Don't feel bad. I have been fighting a deriorating scope issue for some time and did not realize it until I started testing the .338 Aluminum tips from Georgia. I could not believe that it did not manifest itself with the Sierra 300 SMKs, but it didn't. Now this rifle scope combination was not my best one and I always attributed tthe lack of performace to the shooter (me). But when it started double-grouping I knew something was up. This morning I shot the same rifle with a different scope (one that shot in the zeroes last week) and boy what a difference.

Now, I can finally develop that carry rifle .338 McCallum Magnum (developed in the mid 1990s based on the 338 snyper/Lapua casings) load with the 265s or the 280s... Nightforce NXS 12-42 NP1RR circa 2004.

James
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Berger 210 VLD on Black Bear - Field Report
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need a BIG black bear? Michael Eichele Swap A Hunt 13 11-15-2011 03:53 PM
.338 WM too much for Black Bear? jasonprox700 Bear Hunting 37 08-26-2011 07:36 AM
Ruger 77/17 17HMR Range & Field Report 1100 Remington Man Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics 0 07-04-2011 12:10 PM
7mm 160 grain Accubond Field Report dakor Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics 7 02-22-2005 08:50 AM
7 MM for Black Bear Tim Behle Long Range Hunting & Shooting 8 09-19-2002 11:55 PM

Current Poll
How Many Different Cartridges Do You Reload For?
ZERO, all factory ammo - 8.07%
328 Votes
1 - 2.86%
116 Votes
2 or 3 - 14.55%
591 Votes
4 or 5 - 20.48%
832 Votes
6 or 7 - 14.55%
591 Votes
8 or 9 - 8.86%
360 Votes
10 or more - 30.63%
1,244 Vote
Total Votes: 4,062
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC