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To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

 
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  #15  
Old 03-20-2013, 11:37 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

BTW, Joel and Swamplord thanks for the picts and links.
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  #16  
Old 03-21-2013, 04:57 AM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bwht4x4 View Post
Rhetorical question: If I sand a little here and there and then bed it and then put the screws back in and they bind a little in the pillars am I going to have an issue?
YES! Your action screws cannot touch the inside of the pillars or they will act like an additional recoil lug.
If you are going to use the existing pillars, you should open up the inside diameter after you have finished the bedding. A drill press will work fine.
It' s not uncommon for the inlet to be off center in the stock...I've seen my share of "crooked stuff". Either mill, Dremel, or sand away enough material in the action area to properly align the barreled action in the stock. I free float the action in the stock so there is no chance of binding. You can use the "tape on the barrel trick" here. Then proceed to bedding, then address the id of the pillars.

I have a touch of that OCD disease as well, but I'm finding that the older I get the less severe it is.
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  #17  
Old 03-24-2013, 02:41 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

Shot the gun for the first time today. All that's been done to the gun is the new Edge stock, a Jewell trigger, Talley rings and a Leupold VX-II 6-18x40mm scope. I have not tried to bed it yet.

These were my two final 100 yard five shoot groups after breaking it in.

Some might think this are fine, but I'm still thinking it can do better. I plan on bedding it soon, but I wonder what things a gunsmith can do to wring out a little more accuracy (things that I can't do) before I bed it. I'd like to keep the stock barrel, but would swap it out if I can't get to where I want it to go.

Which of these would people say could garner the best results in accuracy for the money spent?

-True bolt lugs
-True receiver lugs
-Square receiver to barrel
-Check crown and possibly re-crown
-Larger recoil lug (i.e. Tubbs, Kampfield, etc.)
-???
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To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock-20130324_121513.jpg   To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock-20130324_121529.jpg  

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  #18  
Old 03-24-2013, 06:31 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

From your list I would say the larger recoil lug is by far the least important. A true and square action are very important, But I feel you will see great improvements with a good bed job and some load tuning, If you feel like an additional at home project you can also lap the lugs, just go easy and keep track with calipers, so you dont take off to much. I haven't seen a McMillian yet that didn't need some type of inletting and bedding.
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  #19  
Old 03-24-2013, 08:13 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bwht4x4 View Post
I just purchased a new Rem 700 CDL SF in 30-06. I'm going through the motions of upgrading some of the components of the rifle. To date it's been a new Jewell trigger and a McMillian Edge stock (came with pillars). I have the Talley rings and now waiting for the Leupold scope. I have not shot it yet.

I'm considering whether or not skim bed the action or just bed the recoil lug. To be honest I'm not sure what I would skim bed because below the action as there's really nothing there and what is there is so low that no part of the action is resting on it. It appears like the only spots the action touches the stock is around the recoil lug/front bolt hole and at the rear tang/bolt hole. The rear tang is such a small spot and wouldn't take much bedding. Right now I'm leaning toward just bedding the recoil lug with Devcon epoxy and nothing else. I am thinking I wanted to give it a solid area to push against.

The other issue is the barrel is not centered in the barrel inletting. Can this be re-centered if I bed the lug?

So...

Should I bed just the recoil lug before I shoot it or shoot it first?

Should I skim bed all of it before I shoot it?

If I skim bed all of it what do I bed....the recoil lug area and the small rear tang area? There isn't much else to bed.

Thanks
Bwht4x4, I hope not to throw a wrench in the pie, but as far as the barrel being off center in the channel, it COULD be the stock, but it can also be the holes in the action not being drilled and tapped on true center with the bore line, OR, if the lug is slightly out of position, when the barrel was tightened against it. But more then likely, if it is NOT the stock, it is probably the holes being slightly off true centerline.
I had a 700p a few years back, and that is what it was. They ended up replacing the receiver.
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  #20  
Old 03-24-2013, 09:01 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

I agree with everything Joel has said on this.

About your questions as to what you should do next, I think bedding is about the only thing I would advise. The other work you mentioned about lapping lugs and truing things will change headspace slightly. That would require a little bit of barrel work and I don't believe it's worth it to spend money for a smith to work on a factory barrel. I always advise customers to save that money and just shoot it until they're ready to pay for a new barrel. It will need one someday anyway and it's a much better investment. It's what really makes the biggest difference in a rifle anyway.

I would put the barreled action in the stock and carefully trace around the tang with a very sharp pencil. Then use a dremel to rough up the surface areas in the stock bed area obviously staying inside of the traced line around the tang. Leave no factory paint remaining and leave it rough. This will probably allow the barrel to sit straight down the channel.

Wrap some layers of tape around the action screws so they fit kind of snug inside of the pillars, not real tight, just kind of snug. Trim that tape off at or just below where the screw sticks out of the pillar. I use seperate, shorter screws for this. You can get them at the hardware store (they're 1/4X28) and trim them to length. This will keep the screws centered in the pillars and keeps excess epoxy from getting all over the screws and into the pillar.

Put the screws through the pillars and screw them into the receiver then see if it will fit into the stock. If it fits with no problem it's ready to bed.

Put a layer of masking tape on the front, sides and bottom of the recoil lug for clearance later. Trim tight with an Exacto blade. It might not be a bad idea to put a few layers of tape around the barrel out at the end of the fore end, but not enough to where the barrel fits tight and not so much as to force it into center if it doesn't want to go there. If it wants to sit a little off center then let it do that and sand out the channel later as Joel said. It's important to make sure the barreled action sits completely relaxed and stress free as it cures.

Remove those pillars and apply release agent to the action and screws then put them back on and bed it. Try to smooth it all out so that you reduce the air bubbles. Spread it on the sides of the pillars too. Once you squeeze it down into the stock, look to see if the pillars are flat or even better slightly protruding down on the bottom side of the stock. You'll want to make sure that the bottom metal makes contact with the bottom of the pillars. If they don't, unscrew them one at a time and put a small washer in there then gently tighten the screws so it pulls the action and pillars down. Once you feel it snug from the pillar making contact with the washer stop. No need to gorilla torque it.

I'm sorry for rambling I realize that's WAY more than you asked for but I'd bet if you do that it will shoot noticeably better.

Marc
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  #21  
Old 03-24-2013, 11:03 PM
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Re: To Bed or Not Bed the Recoil Lug in New McMillian Edge Stock

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcS View Post
The other work you mentioned about lapping lugs and truing things will change headspace slightly. That would require a little bit of barrel work and I don't believe it's worth it to spend money for a smith to work on a factory barrel. I always advise customers to save that money and just shoot it until they're ready to pay for a new barrel. It will need one someday anyway and it's a much better investment. It's what really makes the biggest difference in a rifle anyway.


Marc
Thanks Marc for all of this info and especially your opinion on the barrel/action work. I was in the same camp as you on this. The few hundred of dollars spent on doing this work could be spent on a new barrel, which would be a totally different animal for sure. In fact I think this rifle could be the perfect hunting rifle with a new barrel, IMO.

In the interim I think I'll try to bed it and see if that helps the accuracy a bit. If it does, then I'll leave it. If I can't get it to shrink a bit I may have to figure out a new barrel. Any recommendations on new barrels if I have to go that route? I was leaning toward either a Lilja or Krieger and was thinking of going up to a 26" barrel.
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