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anyone admit to making a terrible shot

 
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  #29  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:08 PM
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Location: Michigan
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Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

Antelope hunt Wyoming, I tagged out on antelope so had a few deer tags.
running a 6.5x55 doe came out at 450 + yards, I dialed in scope was at 10 power. took a nice head shot, it dropped, I walked up to it and it had one tinny horn on it that I could not see with the scope. big body and 1 inch horn.

Note: use a spotting scope for target detection.....

had to waste a buck tag on that one...

312.00 mistake
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  #30  
Old 09-25-2013, 08:25 PM
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Join Date: May 2012
Location: N.D.
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Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by fmsniper View Post
Antelope hunt Wyoming, I tagged out on antelope so had a few deer tags.
running a 6.5x55 doe came out at 450 + yards, I dialed in scope was at 10 power. took a nice head shot, it dropped, I walked up to it and it had one tinny horn on it that I could not see with the scope. big body and 1 inch horn.

Note: use a spotting scope for target detection.....

had to waste a buck tag on that one...

312.00 mistake
Here in ND the rule is visible antler so that'd have been a doe.

We hunt at times where there are planty of mule deer and white tail deer in an area at the same time. You don't shoot a deer on a whitetail tag you can just see the face on (say in a bush/ tree row) or you'll get a mule deer that still has milk on it's lips and you'll be burning a mule deer tag on it; ask me how I know that one. It's even more important to be careful this year (and last year) as the mule deer doe tags are shut down for the year so a mulligan isn't even an option; you'd likely take a wrong species violation from the g&f.
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  #31  
Old 09-27-2013, 11:40 PM
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Join Date: May 2009
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Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

In 1996, I didn't bother to range test/confirm zero on a rifle i hadn't used for a few years and shot a mulie doe through the hips at 310, twice!! I think the first shot basically paralyzed her back end, because she tried to pull herself along with her front legs. Took at second shot that hit 3" high from the first. Got the deer, but range tests the next day had me shooting 6" right for some unknown reason. No idea what/how it happened, but felt like crap and have never gone hunting without checking sights since.
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  #32  
Old 10-02-2013, 05:23 PM
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Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

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Originally Posted by lloydsmale View Post
I shoot alot of deer every year and take pride in the fact that i usually shoot well. Last night was an exception. Most deer we shoot are out at 300 plus yards. Last night i had one in front of me at 125 and was using my 300 H&H with a 150 tsx. Shot the deer and it dropped on the spot. It was early so i kept hunting but didnt see anything else. At dark i went over to guy it and found it laying there dead with a broken back. i was shooting right behind the shoulder and the shot felt right and hit the deer right where the hind quarters conect to the back bone. I dont remember my gun getting bumped so i cant blame the gun or scope but i will either check it today if i have time or grab a different rifle till i have time to. I think what happened was that it was such a short shot i didnt take my time and just thought it was a chip shot. It taught me a lesson though. A guys got to take the same attitude toward a shot on live game at 50 yards as he does at 500. I just as easily could have sent that deer off to die a terrible death.
I have made several BAD shots in my day. Been fortunate to have only lost one animal in my hunting career and do my best to prevent that from ever happening but if you hunt long enough, it will happen.

Thinking back, including that lost pronghorn buck, I can think of 4 shots I muffed and every one was my fault. The good thing is that with long range hunting, generally, if you screw up the set up with an incorrect range measurement or screw the dial up or hold over up, you generally miss clean with just wounded pride.
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  #33  
Old 10-02-2013, 07:43 PM
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Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

I have made more than one less than perfect shot, fortunately I eventually recovered the game.
If you hunt long enough it will happen, no way around it.
I've always subscribed to the theory of "there's no replacement for displacement", always use the biggest gun you can shoot well and shoot if often.
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  #34  
Old 10-02-2013, 10:26 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ND
Posts: 230
Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

If you haven't made a bad shot you just haven't hunted long enough. As long as we learn from our mistakes.
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  #35  
Old 10-03-2013, 11:32 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Central Montana
Posts: 105
Re: anyone admit to making a terrible shot

Anyone that hunts at all will eventually make a bad shot, we just try to do our best to follow through and finish what we started.

Mine (I have had a couple) was on an antelope but a few years back when I was 14. It was the last week of the season and I hadn't hunted at all since I had saved up my nickels and dimes to buy my 700 7mag, then had to wait for Leupold to ship me the scope, and by the time I had it all together, season was almost over. So off I trot with my folks and brothers because antelope hunting is a team sport. We found a herd of bucks that were pretty spooky from being chased around all weekend, and got to about 425 on them, with no way to get closer. Dad told me to pick one since they had all lost their horns, so I did, and at the first shot, he sat straight down like a dog and the others ran off. So I shot again, saw the bullet kick up dust so it thought I was shooting high, so held lower, shot again and started to reload when he tipped over. Upon getting up to him, there were two shots behind the shoulder about a hands width apart, and both of his back legs where blown off at the hocks. Dad and brothers then said they had seen my first shot hit him there but hadn't said anything because they didn't want to rattle me. Next two shots where right where they needed to be, just as in practice. Plain and simple, I made a REALLY bad shot, had to have been from a massive flinch, because the follow ups were right on. I was lucky to have broken him down on the first shot instead of just taking out a single leg, or things would have gotten ugly. To this day I would have preferred a clean miss or to have probably not shot at all, but that buck and that rifle were my start into long range shooting and I learned a lot in that little encounter.
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