Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics


Reply

For 7 mm enthusiasts

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #43  
Old 09-19-2013, 07:00 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: N.D.
Posts: 2,930
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lefty7mmstw View Post
Have you heard of Cooper rifles? They are a smaller stateside maker that is building a left hand mid-weight barreled 7stw rifle. Other than that I'd look at Tikka, Browning, and Remington depending on the caliber you'd like.
I'm an oddbadd at heart with rifles and finally got into a left handed semi-custom in 7stw a year and a half ago. If the European calibers were'nt as bad as they are to get brass for I'd probably already be in that chambering.
oddbadd= oddball-- sleep typing I guess

I'd guess the capacity of the 7x66 puts it at the performance of the 7x300win wildcat.. Not a bad place to be in a standard length action.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 09-20-2013, 09:24 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 304
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

The 'standard' 7mm-300WinMag wildcat, imho, strikes the perfect balance for increased performance btw the 7mmRM (to me the beginning of serious "7mm Elk Medicine") and the much larger 7mmSTW/7mm Dakota/7mm RUM variants.

To me, a 180gr from a 7mm @ ~3,200FPS (I'm not interested in velocity higher than that due to the offsetting "expense" of barrel cooking) would really solidify my confidence on 500-700yd medium/large sized "on-game" shots for this bore size. If bullet impact performance - in particular wgt retention/appropriate expansion - remains consistently high, this would adjust my timeline for a "bigger hammer" by quite a bit given where I currently hunt.

I think the greater challenge for these high-velocity chamberings, in a hunting context, is managing sectional density for the purpose of maintaining useful terminal performance across the velocity range. For paper-punching or varmint hunting controlled expansion is not an important criteria, but for medium/large sized game it is a very important consideration.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 09-20-2013, 04:47 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: N.D.
Posts: 2,930
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by fmajor View Post
The 'standard' 7mm-300WinMag wildcat, imho, strikes the perfect balance for increased performance btw the 7mmRM (to me the beginning of serious "7mm Elk Medicine") and the much larger 7mmSTW/7mm Dakota/7mm RUM variants.

To me, a 180gr from a 7mm @ ~3,200FPS (I'm not interested in velocity higher than that due to the offsetting "expense" of barrel cooking) would really solidify my confidence on 500-700yd medium/large sized "on-game" shots for this bore size. If bullet impact performance - in particular wgt retention/appropriate expansion - remains consistently high, this would adjust my timeline for a "bigger hammer" by quite a bit given where I currently hunt.

I think the greater challenge for these high-velocity chamberings, in a hunting context, is managing sectional density for the purpose of maintaining useful terminal performance across the velocity range. For paper-punching or varmint hunting controlled expansion is not an important criteria, but for medium/large sized game it is a very important consideration.
I've never had any trouble blowing clean through anything I've touched with a bigger 7mm, whether it was a 7rem, 7stw, or 7rum. I usually use a mid weight bullet such as a 140 grain sierra or accubond. The Only bullet I've caught from a 7mm out of a few dozen 7mm kills was a 140 grain sierra pro hunter launched into a large whitetail doe at about 300 yards on a quartering run. The bullet weighed 82 grains after going through the hip. The bullet is the third from the left in the pic in this thread.

http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...bullets-98150/
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 09-24-2013, 11:04 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Norway, Buskerud
Posts: 333
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lefty7mmstw View Post
Have you heard of Cooper rifles? They are a smaller stateside maker that is building a left hand mid-weight barreled 7stw rifle. Other than that I'd look at Tikka, Browning, and Remington depending on the caliber you'd like.
I'm an oddbadd at heart with rifles and finally got into a left handed semi-custom in 7stw a year and a half ago. If the European calibers were'nt as bad as they are to get brass for I'd probably already be in that chambering.
Thanks for the tip concerning Cooper rifles! I know about them and in particular about the Mod. 56. Great rifle, but due to American export restrictions it's almost impossible to purchase one. So long are there only two ways to get a Cooper into Northern - or Central - Europe. Shipping via Canada (long lasting process) or purchase in a Norwegian gunshop (surely get's his products from Canada too...) for prices between 2500 - 3000 Euro Tikka and its more expensive brother, the Sako, are good guns, but unfortunately only available with 23,5' bbl. Not that good for the performance. Remingtons are great and that's what I'm going use as a basic modul ( 700 CDL LH).
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 09-24-2013, 11:35 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Norway, Buskerud
Posts: 333
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by fmajor View Post
I'm also a huge proponent of the 7mm chamberings. I received my first 7mm Rem Mag (Rem 700 ADL) in the spring of 1983 as a high-school graduation present.

The 7x66 Super Express v Hofe sounds like a great wildcat chambering - especially with a beltless case. However, as mentioned, obtaining the brass cases is most often the greatest challenge. Is the .404 Jeffrey parent case readily available in your European market?

Here in the States, wildcatting is usually done with the more readily available cases/chamberings. That's not *always" true, but is the general practice and for many reasons.

A prime example and relevant to this topic is the 7mm/300 Win mag wildcat. This chambering produces ballistics between the 7mm Rem Mag and the 7mm STW (not unlike your 7x66 SE v Hofe) using readily available 300 Win Mag cases (OK, given the reloading component market of late few things are readily available....).

I'm planning on having a 7mm/300 Win Mag put together as soon as I'm able because I happen to have about 350 new, *same lot number* 300 Win Mag cases just waiting (and NO THEY ARE NOT FOR SALE!!!).

Great topic and excellent discussion thus far!!! That said, I'm also an advocate for the big .338's (think 338 Lapua AI or similar), but in a more strict application well beyond where I'd employ any 7mm.

For me, the faster 7mm's get the nod for my big-game hunting needs from antelope/mule deer up to elk at moderate ranges (400-500 yds).
Thank you for your detailed, substantial and very interesting post!
Itís nice to hear that a good discussion is going on. Thatís precisely what I wanted to have, a discussion about one of our passions. Rifles in 7 mm for long - range hunting. Since Iím visiting this site my horizon both gun- and hunting wise got widened considerably. Itís interesting to see the often different views of hunters from America, Canada and so on compared to us in Europe. It is just about the approach, which has to be (almost) without any prejudice.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 09-24-2013, 01:47 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Norway, Buskerud
Posts: 333
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
Varberger, other than the "howitzer" bashing, a very interesting thread. The 7 x 66 Super Express vom Hofe sounds like it lies between the 7 WSM and 7 Dakota which are also based off the 404 Jeffry, which is probably my favorite basic case design.

Interestingly, in another thread, we have been discussing another European created cartridge being the 8x68S. I like it and it could easily be necked down to a 7mm. As it is, it would be very close to a 7/300 WM. If improved it can match the 7 STW which is the same as a 7 Dakota in performance. Norma makes the 6x68S brass and it is available here in the US for a reasonable price.... and.... it has no belt

I also like the 338 LM as a parent case for a 7mm cartridge and would pick that over a RUM for better brass and a more compact configuration which is friendlier to the longer high BC Long Range bullets.

BTW, On a side note, I shot the 300 RUM for a few years without a muzzle brake and shot many sub 1/2 MOA groups with it. My new 300 RUM wears a muzzle brake to both make it more pleasant and more effective in getting back on target which is important int the Long Range game. You will probably notice that most of the serious LR shooters in this forum put brakes on their rifles, even the small er calibers.
Good to hear that you like the threat and are contributing to it even though itís from the ę softgun - fractionĽ. When I started the thread, I really wasnít thinking about any kind of argument. The whole thing is about our passion, all kind of rifles in all kind of calibres for long Ė range hunting. Not more, not less. I believe that Mudrunner means the same and influenced by some bad experiences in the past for himself, he was so kind to warn me about possible reactions.
Personally I have more passion for the 7s, but I also own ďhowitzersĒ I really donít want to miss. My pseudonym Varberger comes from a superb Swedish shooter I own in 300WM.
Itís all about personal preferences, and if someone like me has made his best hunting experiences with a 7 mm (Drilling in 7 x 65R) over a very long period (more than 30 years), so it might be no wonder. Anyone should use the gun(s) and calibre(s) he likes best. Live and let live!
The 8 x 68 S is IMO the best magnum in its calibre group between the 300 WM and the 338 WM due to performance and yes, itís beltless. Even here in Europe the 300 WM is the most popular magnum round, right in front of the 7RM and 8 x 68 S. Rumís, Saumís and STW are almost unknown, but that might change in future times. The 7 mm STW is hopefully the first one being discovered!
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 09-24-2013, 07:04 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,101
Re: For 7 mm enthusiasts

I wish that more 8mm were on the market. there really isn't a potential long range chambering in the 8mm other than the 8mm Remington, which is hard to find brass for (unless 7stw blown out). Then the real kicker is bullets.
What kind of velocity do you see with what weight of bullet with the 8*56?? What bullets do most people use??

Sorry for the side track guys.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
Do you archery hunt for elk?
YES - 32.12%
62 Votes
NO - 52.33%
101 Votes
Not yet, but I plan to. - 15.54%
30 Votes
Total Votes: 193
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC