Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics


Reply

22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #8  
Old 03-02-2013, 04:23 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,133
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

The only way to see a large bore .224 (22-243, etc) shine is to use a fast twist barrel. My 8" twist 22-243 would shoot exceptional groups with heavy A-Max bullets. Other guys have had good luck with the 80 SMK bullet.

I used the 22-243 to achieve DRT kills on fat PA groundhogs out to about 1,000 yds. Longer shots were probably possible but my hunting area just didn't provide many really long range shooting possibilities. Homes have popped up everywhere over the last 20 years.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-03-2013, 04:45 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 63
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

Thanks guys , probably just build a 22-250 or maybe a 22-250ai, and wait on the longrange 22-243, 22-6mm til I get another barrel
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-03-2013, 01:26 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,603
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruton View Post
Thanks guys , probably just build a 22-250 or maybe a 22-250ai, and wait on the longrange 22-243, 22-6mm til I get another barrel
I honestly think that before even considering a 22-243 or the 22/6mm, I would look at something like the Jaybird or a 6x47 Lapua necked down to .223 in a 1:8 twist barrel. The neck's way too short on the .243 case for what you get, and the 57mm case is way overbore creating other issues. Even a 22-250AI is slightly overbore, but with a fast twist barrel should be just fine. The Jaybird is similar to the 22-243, but with a far better neck and shoulder design. Plus there's plenty of load development already done. With a .300" neck length and 80 grain bullets it should be fantastic.
gary
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-03-2013, 06:48 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,133
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

I have had no experience with the 6x47 or the Jaybird but the 22-243AI has always performed exceptional for me. No problems with neck length or shoulder angle with the 22-243 or the AI variant in my experience.

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-03-2013, 08:25 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: I live in Canada on the prairies and shoot 5 or 6 deer a year.
Posts: 52
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trickymissfit View Post
I shoot a .223 Remington on coyotes a lot of the time around here. We get some pretty good sized dogs, and 35lb. ones are getting to be rather common anymore. Most of my hits have been under 300 yards, but have taken a couple dogs close to 400 yards. To me anyway, the .223 is starting to get marginal after 400 yards for that clean one hit kill. At 300 yards it drops them like a rock. Looking at the ballistics chart, and using the data from my Remington, I see 280 ft.lb. of energy at 500 yards (3200 fps .255B/C), and about 390 ft.lb. at 400 yards. But 548ft.lb. at 300 yards. Now had we been using the 22 Jaybird at 500 yards with the same 55 grain bullet will give you 471 ft.lb. of energy (3900fps), and 850 ft.lb at 300 yards.

I like the case design of the Jaybird, but would like it a lot better in 6mm, and a 1:8 twist barrel
gary
Well if you have a thing for a "Jaybird" go for, it but the 223 lets you spend more time shooting and less time fiddling.
I don't think your dogs are any bigger than the ones up here in Canada, 500 and under is short range and a 233 works just fine. If you want to go out farther then get a fast twist and shoot something heavier.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-04-2013, 12:00 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,603
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

Quote:
Originally Posted by north of 53 View Post
Well if you have a thing for a "Jaybird" go for, it but the 223 lets you spend more time shooting and less time fiddling.
I don't think your dogs are any bigger than the ones up here in Canada, 500 and under is short range and a 233 works just fine. If you want to go out farther then get a fast twist and shoot something heavier.
well you're a lot better with holdover than most folks are. With a 200 yard zero, your looking at 48" of bullet drop in a typical .223 load and a 55 grain bullet. A 300 yard zero will still have three feet of drop. That's a lot of clicks to keep track of for that 500 yard shot
gary
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-04-2013, 01:01 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: I live in Canada on the prairies and shoot 5 or 6 deer a year.
Posts: 52
Re: 22-250AI or 22-243 that's my question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trickymissfit View Post
well you're a lot better with holdover than most folks are. With a 200 yard zero, your looking at 48" of bullet drop in a typical .223 load and a 55 grain bullet. A 300 yard zero will still have three feet of drop. That's a lot of clicks to keep track of for that 500 yard shot
gary
Well first of you are probably right I am better than most at hold over but I don't need to be for this. Most of the time I don't get real technical on this stuff not because I can't but because I just like to spend more time out shooting. Having said that lets get technical for a moment here then.

If I go to the Hodgdon web sit they list a few loads for 55 grain bullet at over 3300 ft/sec. So I will use 3300 per sec (this can be worked out at 3200 as well) and then bring up Sierra software and plug in a 55 sierra blitz . Lets say we have a 4" kill zone on a Coyote and plug that in to the software it gives us a zero of 225 yards with a maximum point blank range of over 250 yards. Now for hold over why not use mill dots , that's what people do if they want to shoot out there a little. So at 500 yards that is 2.5 dots, hold the coyote between the 2nd and third dot and just shoot him its not that hard and you don't have to guess at it. You do need a good range finder and if you shoot a lot of different guns a drop chart on the stock helps just so you don't forget. If it is real windy you will have a lot more of a challenge but with a little trigger time in the wind and a good wind meter it is still very doable. I am not sure why people want to make shooting out to 500 yards that hard.

If you don't have mill dots then take a duplex variable power scope and play around a bit until you know for sure at what power the post is your point of impact at 500 yards do the same for 400 yards and stop guessing at hold overs and start making the shots.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC