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Scope questions

 
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  #1  
Old 11-28-2013, 11:40 AM
saw saw is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW IL
Posts: 5
Scope questions

I just had my Rem 700 Blue printed and rebarreled in 22-250 AI with 1/9 twist shooting 75 gr Amaxs. I currently have a Leupold VX-III 4-14x40. This is a coyote rifle. I am wanting to shoot (long Range for me) 500 - 600 yards reliably. I was going to send it in and have a new reticle put in it by Leupold. Not sure which one considering one of these Varmint, Mildot, or LRV Duplex. Not really sure I am open to suggestions. Also if I got the reticle would the ballistic matched turrets be a waste? Thanks in advance.
Scott
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  #2  
Old 11-29-2013, 05:29 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Missouri Ozarks
Posts: 421
Re: Scope questions

Whatever reticle you pick would need to be able to match your trajectory. You might also look at the CDS turret Leupold offers if dialing is an option. If you dial a standard duplex will work as well as anything else in my opinion.

Bob
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  #3  
Old 11-29-2013, 08:55 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Colorado
Posts: 146
Re: Scope questions

I'd probably go M1 turret on there for about $95 from custom shop. Sounds like a cool rig.
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  #4  
Old 11-29-2013, 09:22 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,095
Re: Scope questions

For giggles, I ran the drops assuming 3350fps MV. If you zero at 200, you basically are looking at being 1" high at 100yds and needing 9MOA of adjustment to hit at 600.

My experience in hunting coyotes is that they are not often hanging out at a given range - they are generally on the move. Because of that, I would look at a reticle solution vs. dialing. When evaluating reticles, keep in mind what your drops will be. My quick run of the 75AMAX at 3350 is showing:

1.7. MOA at 300yds

3.8. MOA at 400yds

6.2. MOA at 500 yds

If Leupy has a reticle that gives you subtensions close to 2,4, and 6 MOA it will be bad medicine for any coyotes venturing near your stand. Easy, easy, easy to point and shoot, and keep shots in the killzone by splitting the difference on "in-betweener" shots.

Good luck

Last edited by varmintH8R; 11-29-2013 at 09:57 PM.
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  #5  
Old 11-29-2013, 09:43 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Pueblo, CO
Posts: 1,175
Re: Scope questions

Varmint Man's got it right. If I were setting up another coyote rig I'd get the 4.5-14X40mm VX-III with Varmint Hunter's reticle (for fast coyote hunting applications). Spend the money while it's there and get the M1 turret (elevation only) and apply the 3 excellent 1.77 MOA subtension units either side of vertical axis for windage reference and turret clicks if you choose. Pretty much everything is there in a nice tight little package then depending on how you want to apply it.

Buddy of mine uses this kinduva' setup on an AR-10 243/87 V-Max combination and kills more coyotes out to 800 yds. than anyone I've ever seen or even heard of.
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  #6  
Old 11-29-2013, 10:24 PM
saw saw is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW IL
Posts: 5
Re: Scope questions

Thanks for all the responses, SS you would do the Varmint reticle and the M1 turret? Kurt, I love it I am still working loads, Tweaking it. Now if I could get a yote to cooperate. Once Deer season gets over.
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  #7  
Old 12-07-2013, 11:10 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Lawton, OK
Posts: 31
Re: Scope questions

There are many differing opinions on scopes magnification and turret types. My personal opinion is to stay away from BDC reticles. Your trajectory changes with altitude, wind, temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, etc. A BDC knob will work for one condition. Usually it is calibrated for standard conditions unless you provide your own data, but even then it is set for what the conditions were when you calculated that information. Out to around 400 yards the variance will most likely be minimal, however, as you go further out, small differences mean large errors. The farther you shoot, the more noticeable the errors become. If you plan to shoot in one location where altitude and weather doesn't vary much (i.e. Florida) and shoot within 400 yards, a BDC would probably be fine but why limit yourself? Nothing replaces range time and knowing the capability of your rifle. I personally find BDC knobs to be more of a marketing gimmick but that's just me.
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