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1/4 vs 1/8 click

 
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  #1  
Old 02-07-2006, 10:53 PM
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1/4 vs 1/8 click

What do most prefer for long range and why? I would assume 1/8 would be better because a smaller movement would allow for finer detail...but we all know what happens when you assume!
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Old 02-07-2006, 11:53 PM
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

I tried to do some research for you but got nowhere with it. Some where I remember reading that 1/8 moa adjustments result in having half of the internal movement. If a 1/4 moa scope has 50 moa of elevation adjustment the same scope with a 1/8 moa adjustment will yield only 25 moa internally.

I know I read something like this but I just cant find it. The article had the explanation as to why.

You might research some scope makers sites and see if they publish the internal moa for the same scope offered both ways.

Sorry I couldn't find some more helpfull info.

Besides that is just alot of cranking for the longer ranges.
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  #3  
Old 02-08-2006, 03:20 PM
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

There's an old rule of thumb that competitive shooters have used over the years regarding how fine the sight adjustments should be. It boils down to no finer than one-third the group size you can shoot. Finer adjustment per click increases the probability that you won't see the change with your next shot.

Olympic team shooters using 22 rimfire rifles like to have 1/12th MOA on their aperture sights. At 50 meters, one click moves impact about 1 mm. Before the international target size was reduced a bit, 1/6th MOA rear sights were the norm.

Benchresters seem to like 1/8th MOA clicks as they can center their 1/4th to 1/2 MOA groups to the target's center up to 1000 yards easier.

Highpower rifle shooters like 1/4 MOA for aperture sights through 600 yards and with scopes to 1000 yards. The US (and other country's, too) Palma Team shooting aperture sights from 600 to 1000 yards uses 1/2-MOA clicks on their rear sight.

So go out and measure some of your 15- to 20-shot long range groups. Then note how much 1/3rd their biggest ones size is; that's about the minimum you'll use effectively in the field correcting for wind and range settings.

When similar models of scopes have either 1/4 or 1/8 MOA value per click, the main difference is the 1/8 one has twice as many clicks per knob turn. This lets the maker keep the same mechanics for both scopes except for the ball detent ring on the adjustments. Another way to do it is to double the adjustment thread count per inch using the same ball detent assembly; this means the adjustment moves only half as far for the same degrees of knob turn.
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  #4  
Old 02-09-2006, 04:32 PM
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

The two scopes I was looking at are both Sightrons:

S2 4-16x42

http://sightron.com/index.php?action..._id=1047415304

This scope has 1/8" clicks and 56 of elevation, and the other is the S2 4.5-14x42, which has 50 inches of elevation.

http://sightron.com/index.php?action..._id=1047415180

The scope is going to be mounted on a rifle that I have on layaway right now until my tax return comes in, so I'm not sure what my groups will be like. I am planning on shooting at game with a self imposed limit of 600 yards or less (for now) while I'm learning better trigger control and breathing techniques. I have made several 300+ yard shots and a 450 yard shot on an antelope.
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  #5  
Old 02-13-2006, 07:45 PM
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Location: Jamestown, North Dakota
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

I use both and have no real preference. You just have to crank more on the 1/8" click models. Once you do decide, I have a lightly used 4x16x42 SII with the mildot reticle that I'm going to sell. Nothing wrong with it, just upgraded to an SIII with side focus. Shoot me an email if interested. ropp (at) state.nd.us

huntin1
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  #6  
Old 02-14-2006, 02:56 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2005
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

I prefer 1/2 min. divisions. Would make tracking your zero & come-ups much easier. I wish Leupy offered the M2 knobs on the 1" VX3 scopes.
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  #7  
Old 02-14-2006, 10:09 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2005
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Re: 1/4 vs 1/8 click

My Swarovski 6x24x50PH is 1/6 how common is that and why? Screws with my math, I always have to double check.
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