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Shaking while shooting

 
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  #8  
Old 12-20-2001, 11:08 PM
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Location: Palmer, Alaska
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Re: Shaking while shooting

If you put some pressure into the shoulder and squeeze the grip firm between your palm and three fingers on your trigger hand, my thumb to the side, the gun will push back and just slightly rise when fired, if you don't hold firm pressure to your shoulder it will just get a running start at YOU, NOT GOOD. If you do hold tight you move WITH the gun. My 416wby with no brake is a recoil monster, but hold tight, move with it and it's quite differant.

[ 12-21-2001: Message edited by: Brent ]
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  #9  
Old 12-20-2001, 11:22 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Montana
Posts: 58
Re: Shaking while shooting

All excellent answers...

First of all, the only way you will ever eliminate the movement is if you are dead, but that ain't no fun.

I have found that breath control is the most important item to learn.

Second is to evaluate the movement you see, and time your shot (when possible) at the optimum moment when your sight picture is perfect.

As for the grip, off the bench I do not "grip" the forestock. It rests in a cradle, and my hand is there just to steady my body, not my rifle. Sometimes I don't use my off hand to even touch the front of the rifle, but rather use it under the butt of the stock to center the rifle on my shoulder.

As for the firing hand, I do not wrap my thumb around the grip, but rather keep it on the "outside". Lower three fingers and palm are used as a platform for the trigger finger.

In a hunting situation I always try to find some inanimate object to rest upon. I do use the off hand and the forearm, with a light grip, not to hold the rifle on target, but to control it during recoil. (The more you try to hold a rifle, the more it will wander.)

I use a conventional wrap-around grip for the shooting hand, with the minimum amount of pressure required to control the gun. Trigger pull is exactly that...I "pull" the trigger, not squeeze it as many suggest. When you squeeze a trigger it causes movement of the gun...when you pull it oyu are using only that one finger...
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  #10  
Old 12-21-2001, 10:51 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Lancaster,CA
Posts: 16
Re: Shaking while shooting

Again thanks for personal descriptions,
there seems to be a variety of preferences as everywhere.Still I wonder whether there are "best" gun holds.
1: there seems to be a clear difference of opinion as to the amount of rifle hold and I would appreciate setting my concern to rest:
Dave seems to suggest that he balances the rifle between bipod and butt sandsack,his hands do not hold the rifle at all,he just pulls the trigger: in this setting my question is repeated:I would expect the rifle to kick up(hurting your head and more) as well as back.
2:the following 2 contributors seem to apply a gentle hold onto the rifle stock,which is what I always did(not necessarily correct because I do)To recapitulate the 2 elements of the "hold" a:gently clamp the fore-end to prevent the rifle from kicking up
b [img]images/icons/tongue.gif[/img]ush into your shoulder to take up any slack so the recoil doesnt get "a running start"
c:that business of letting your shoulder move back c the recoiling rifle sounds good
I just dont know how my body or nervous system manages that,we are talking of a split second whack,I truly believe my upper body aint that fast "to move with it". [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

But taking my presumption to the (il)logical end: can one fire a magnum parked in front of ones eyes by 3", by just pulling the trigger and not holding onto the rifle at all- and walk away smiling every time?
I am just to scared to try it

sheephunter
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  #11  
Old 12-21-2001, 11:16 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Canada
Posts: 272
Re: Shaking while shooting

Sheephunter,

Hah... I like the last part. "Not holding the rifle at all and walk away smiling?
It will tell you that you will need 67lb rifle instead of 10-16lb rifle. Not touching the rifle at all? I think he meant just barely touch it and your shoulder will touch the rear butt slightly. It would be nice if you have a portable viewfinder that hook up with the scope and nothing to worry about 3" eye relief. Maybe you have seen that in Marines and Nikon for spotting scope.
-DG
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  #12  
Old 12-21-2001, 11:55 AM
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Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sask. Canada
Posts: 2,410
Re: Shaking while shooting

The way that we hold our rifles is simply according to how hard the damn thing kicks. .223's light shoulder contact, use left hand to work the sandbag for elevation. (Even a .223 will bruise your shoulder if you shoot enough - as in 6-800 rounds in a good day shooting prairie dogs)

.308's similar, but pull back a bit more with the right hand, fairly firm contact so the sucker can't move backward. Important to always hold the rifle the same, shot to shot.

Magnums - left hand on forearm fairly tightly to control upward movement in particular, suck the rascal back and try to roll with it or it will hurt you - either a scope-kiss or a bruised shoulder (or sternum if it is not in the right spot). I am talking light .338's, .30 cal and up Weatherby's etc.

In fact you must consider the weight and caliber of any rifle before you shoot it, otherwise you may end up hurting - worst scope-kiss I have ever seen took 13 stitches.

The heavy (14 lb and up) .300 Win. LR rifles don't require the forearm hold, nor do most heavy shooters that have brakes (eg. we shot a heavy .338 Lapua a bunch without holding the forend).

Continuity is important, in hold, cheek-weld, breathing, trigger control all the marksmanship stuff that makes a bullet fly where you want it to.
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  #13  
Old 12-21-2001, 01:58 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Palmer, Alaska
Posts: 2,539
Re: Shaking while shooting

Sheephunter,

It's not as bad as you think, the first time I shot without holding on to the foregrip I thought the muzzle would plant it self in the dirt behind me, the scope taking a channel out of my face in the process. It just aint so. You just have to DO it. Keep the scope a little farther away the first few times until you realise how tight to hold into your shoulder. The scope will come to your eye but not enough to get you IF you hold it SNUG. I GUARANTEE you the muzzle will come up no more than 1 foot, more than likely 4 to 6 inches if you hold down and in on the trigger hand. I find I'm much more stable with both hands at the rear, one under the other or under the stock for elevation control, that's why I shoot this way.
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  #14  
Old 12-21-2001, 08:08 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Lancaster,CA
Posts: 16
Re: Shaking while shooting

Thanks brothers,
you answered my question,I shall shoot like I always did:giving enough clamping power to prevent serious journeys into my face.
Never had any problem c the 338Mag,the 300RUM
is just a little more kick maybe.
Thanks for keeping me healthy

sheephunter
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