Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Long Range Hunting & Shooting

Long Range Hunting & Shooting Nightforce Optics


Reply

Ruger accuracy

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #57  
Old 08-03-2013, 07:49 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Fairview Alfa, Louisiana
Posts: 175
Re: Ruger accuracy

Well fellas I own a a 77 hawkeye lh in 300wm , a sav 10 predator lh. in 260 and a custom 700 338 lh .The ruger is the least accurate at .75 average . the savages the most accurate at .5 average and) my competition gun and a 700 lh. in 338 that I built my self with the help of a friend and his laith lthat shoots very nicely to 1200 sofar . that being said. I have never seen a 77 at a precision rifle match nor have I seen one at a bench gun match. If I had to choose one to keep it would be the 77 , why ?.75 is more than accurate enough for 1k work and the thing is ball bat reliable. A open trigger group. and mauser style controls and hardware make this happen. I have not worked with a bunch of these guns but experience suggest that the 77 is just finiky as hell . I think I would exhaust all handloading. options before I dove in to th smoke ad mirrors world of blue. printing an action .
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 08-03-2013, 10:17 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 180
Re: Ruger accuracy

Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
Just got back from the range from break-in work on my 3 new rifles built on 2 Howa's (S&W and Vanguard) and a Rem 700. No, I'm not rich, I've been buying parts and paying toward these projects for about 3 years now.

You could have sold your old Ruger for a couple hundred and bought an old Vanguard foe a couple hundred and you would have had a better action to work on as far as blueprinting and fitting with custom stock and barrel. In the end your costs would have been less (if you did the whole blueprint thing) by doing the swap. By the time you add up the labor and parts, the Ruger is going to cost a good bit more than the Howa or M70.

It's possible to get a good shooter without a blueprinted action by just sticking on a good barrel. Both my Snederos were great shooters on a stock 700 action. I've got a Vanguard 223 thats' a grea shooter out of the box in the factory plastic stock. But truing up the action and bedding them properly in a good stock just increases the odd of getting a really good reliable precision rifle. And it just feels good

Good luck with the 22-250

The 220 swift, I only did a piller and bedding and recrowned it, my first bedding job. I did a little trigger work. My 280 ackley. My friend installed the Douglas barrel for $300.00. That included the barrel. I bought a Boyd stock $80 and installed the pillers and bedded the stock myself and installed the rail.. I have cussed Ruger a few times but I am satisfied with the way it turned out. I really don't think I could have come out any cheaper. I think it does pretty good for what I have in it. I have put a better scope on it now. A Vortex Viper 6x24 PST. Maybe the groups will improve. We will see if my 700s will out do the Rugers. Like I said I hope they do.

Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 09-10-2013, 08:01 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: winchester, Tennessee. very small rural town.
Posts: 31
Re: Ruger accuracy

you need to type in on youtube.com ruger m77 243 and look at the video by tyborasaurusrex. he is very knowledgeable about this gun and shoot 1200 yards with his. he says that letting the barrel load with copper increases his accuracy tremendously
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 09-10-2013, 07:41 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 111
Re: Ruger accuracy

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigBolin51 View Post
you need to type in on youtube.com ruger m77 243 and look at the video by tyborasaurusrex. he is very knowledgeable about this gun and shoot 1200 yards with his. he says that letting the barrel load with copper increases his accuracy tremendously
this is actually what peaked my interest in my ruger as a long range gun. I asked him what he did to his ruger but got no response.
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 09-11-2013, 03:43 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 746
Re: Ruger accuracy

ILtoMT50 has the right solution to Ruger bedding issues in post #34.

I used that myself, along with a piloted drill bit of the correct size, that Brownells sells expressly for the purpose of pillar bedding a Ruger. It is not a particularly difficult job to do. I did it successfully and I am not particularly skilled at such things. My advice is to use Acraglas to epoxy the pillar in place. Steelbed the front part of the action around the recoil lug and the first inch or two of the barrel. I would be willing to loan you the piloted bit (if I can find the durned thing).

Action screw torque is not complicated, either. Use the German torque on the front action screw (that's GUDENTIGHT, if you're wondering). Apply purple locktite to the rear action screw and tighten until you feel the screw and action seat. Stop there. DO NOT gorilla torque this screw. Apply purple locktite to the center action screw and turn it all the way in, but do not forcefully torque it down.

The integral recoil lug on a Ruger is no less beefy than that on a Mauser 98 or a Winchester Model 70. All three are superior to the stamped sheet metal lugs sandwiched between the barrel and receiver found on the push feed actions. Likewise the wide, flat bedding surface found on the Mauser, Model 70, and Ruger is superior to that of the round actions.

The term "blueprinting" sounds exotic and mysterious. All that really needs to be done is to square the face of the action, square the bolt face, and lap the lugs. That's it. Not expensive or exotic. This should be done when a new barrel is installed anyway. It's the same thing that should be done on ANY action when it is being re-barreled. "Blueprinting" is a waste of time, money, and effort if you have it done without replacing the factory barrel-- just like on any other rifle. The factory barrel may shoot well or it may not. Factory barrels are a crapshoot-- just like with any other rifle.

The trigger sucks. Replace it. No more expensive than doing so on any other rifle, including the blessed Remington 700.

For normal use, the factory Ruger rings are stout and work just fine. Warne makes very nice ones at a reasonable price. If you need a canted rail for longer range work, have your action drilled and tapped and install one of these:

MurphyPrecision.com - Scope Bases, Rings, and Assorted Shooting Accessories.

Once again, it's no more expensive than the Nightforce tactical rails that uber-tactical guys put on their 700's. It should cost you around $50 to have your receiver drilled and tapped.

I ended up replacing the stock on my Ruger. It didn't need to be replaced. I bought my Ruger expressly to perform a build. I had initially planned to go a certain way with my stock selection, but decided not to. By that time, I had already sold the original stock. so I ended up acquiring a factory laminated stock and putting it on the rifle. That was a failure of planning on my part. I like the stock I have now, though it wasn't necessary.

The biggest downside to the Ruger 77 is that the long action magazines are on the short side, just barely having enough length for factory 30-06 or Win Mag cartridges. The same is true of the commercial Mausers and Winchester Model 70's.

Contrary to what has been said here, it is not necessary to throw money at a Ruger to make it shoot. At least, no more so than any other factory rifle without a barrel nut. My Ruger is chambered for 6.5-284 NORMA and wears a Krieger installed barrel (Krieger has since limited the action types that they will install barrels on) and easily shoots sub 1/2 MOA with handloads. I bedded it myself. The trigger has not been touched, though that is on the list. I plan to put a Picatinny rail on it for reasons of personal preference rather than necessity.

I own a Ruger because I wanted a LH bolt action in a controlled feed design. That is a narrow field of choices. I have since quit buying LH actions and have decided that life is better just living with a RH bolt. From what I have seen, Rugers currently run very close in price to new production Winchester Model 70's. Given that choice, I prefer the Model 70. As long as the Model 70 remains in production, I will probably not buy another new Ruger 77.

However, if one already has a Ruger, there is no real reason not to build on it. The Ruger is different from other designs and those differences must be taken into account, but are by no means true obstacles to anyone who does their homework. The supposed problems of the design are myths and misunderstandings. The only real disadvantage is to parts changers who call themselves gunsmiths.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 09-11-2013, 05:43 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 111
Re: Ruger accuracy

Great! That's exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. I'll start looking for a smith in colorado.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 09-12-2013, 03:30 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 746
Re: Ruger accuracy

The OP in the following thread may be able to help you:

I can hardly bring myself to say it! Ruger?

I don't believe he is in Colorado, but that shouldn't really matter.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
I currently have hunting preference points in the following states

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC