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McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

 
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  #22  
Old 12-26-2011, 10:17 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

That is a great rifle.

I had the opportunity to buy a McMillan 30-378 'Outdoorsman' in 2002 at the Outdoorsman in Phoenix. I opted not to. I had the cash in my pocket and could just not bring myself to part with it for such a short barrel life. I bought a 308 instead and shortly after, installed a McMillan stock on it.

I still would LOVE to own a McMillan rifle and still might someday but it will either be a 308 or 338. I have two of their stocks and would not trade them for anything. I wish I had about 5 more. They make very fine products. The term 'you get what you pay for' applies here.

M
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  #23  
Old 12-26-2011, 11:26 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle-mcmillan-029.jpg

McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle-mcmillan-033.jpg

These pictures show the Mcmillan G-30 action and 6061T6 20 moa scope base rail. It has a steel locking pin that sits against the front of the ejection port and has 8-40 scope base screws. The action is slimmed down to provide a light as possible hunting rifle while it retains the strength necessary to handle large magnum cartridges and provide top accuracy. The hollowed out bolt is visible to lessen weight. The action is 8.75" long and weighs 1.75 pounds. The outside diameter is 1.36". The magazine length is 3.68" to handle the 210 grain Bergers seated into the lands.

The stock is virtually identical to the Sako Hunter which is the most popular stock design in the history of Mcmillan fiberglass stocks. It is a very ergonomic stock design that balances the rifle out exceptionally well with the heavy Nightforce 5.5-22 scope. The rifle weighs in at near 10 1/2 pounds with the Nightforce scope but feels much lighter because of the great balance and feel when you shoulder it.

Some of the tangible things incorporated into the stock to give it the great balance and feel are as follows. It is a monte carlo with a very well designed cheekpiece and a palm swell that makes the stock extremely comfortable to shoulder and feels good against the trigger hand. It has a slight amount of cast off that allows the shooter to shoulder the rifle and find the sweet spot in the scope without having to tilt your head. It also has a little cant which allows the toe of the recoil pad to fit into the crease of the shoulder without having to cant the rifle. The stock is fitted with a Decelerator recoil pad which when combined with the Vias muzzle brake completely eliminates felt recoil. In shooting the rifle with max loads of 180 and 200 grain bullets the recoil of this powerful rifle is insignificant.
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  #24  
Old 12-27-2011, 12:16 AM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle-mcmillan-045.jpg

McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle-mcmillan-046.jpg

These show the fluted two lug bolt from the Mcmillan G-30 action. The bolt can be disassembled (field stripped) without tools to clean or install a new firing pin. Always a good idea to carry a new firing pin on a big hunt. The bolt body is made of ultra strong 9310 steel with surface hardenned to over 60 RC. The critical parts of the bolt and action are held to .0005" tight bench rest tolerances. The fluted bolt aids in reliability sweeping dirt and grit away helping the action to operate slick and smooth in the harshest field environments. The flutes also reduce total weight. The bolt face is recessed for strength. The bolt raceways are cut with wire electrical discharge machining which produces tighter tolerances, no tool marks and very smooth operation. The bolt operation on this rifle is very slick. Bolts are fitted to the reciever by hand filing camming angles and lapping the locking lugs. It uses a Sako style claw extracor of Mcmillan design which produces positive extraction and push round feeding. The extractor is housed in the locking lug eliminating the need for an extractor slot to be cut in the barrel. I prefer this design to say the model 70 winchester design which requires the extractor slot to be cut into the barrel. This type design provides for tighter tolerances in the bolt to reciever fit in my opinion.

I will go over much more of this when I discuss the Mcmillan G-30 action. I am very impressed with this action and it is clear to see Mcmillan did their homework to provide the best in benchrest accuracy incorporated into a long range hunting rifle.
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  #25  
Old 12-27-2011, 12:39 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

Hope your folks get better quickly LTLR.

My question is "Why that stock?" I'm not sure I agree with the stock choice and I'm open to new ideas (or old as it may be), but why not the A3 Sporter or the A5, or something? Why that one, for this purpose? Nostalgia?

My thinking is: hunting, or at least shooting in the field is best served from certain specific positions, spec'd out by those that do it for a living- specifically the guys in our wonderful military as snipers, special ops guys, etc. Stocks have evolved to suit them, why wouldn't the same specs suit us as hunters in the same areas? This might not be the place for that discussion, but I like the idea of the A3 sporter and may try one soon, but I'm torn between that and a Manners T-2 as it can be had at 2.6lbs and it has the vertical grip I am infatuated with.

So, it may be rhetorical, but I wonder, why "that" stock on a long range model, and this from a stock making company... Is my thinking flawed here, and is this stock design the best design for long range hunting? No offence or negativity intended, I'm just wondering why that design, specifically the trigger hand grip, was chosen.
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  #26  
Old 12-27-2011, 12:51 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

Thanks Good for your concern about my folks. Your question will need to be answered by Mcmillan. I am just reporting the facts about the rifle and what I am finding out about it. Maybe to create the balance and feel it has which is great. I am finding the rifle is a pleasure to carry hunting all day because of the balance and it shoulders very smooth. They make a tactical long range model which has a different stock maybe like you discussed. This is the hunter model which is lighter and much easier handling however it does retain 1000 yard capability.
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  #27  
Old 12-27-2011, 12:58 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

Good question; We offer the EOL rifles in the Outdoorsman (the one in the photo) in a LRH version which is an A-3 with fixed LOP and comb and a LRH-L (light) which is the Tactical Hunter which is a M40A1 butt and a modified varmint/A-5 type forend. The difference between the Outdoorsman and the LRH-L is just the stock. It gives you the choice of a wider flatter forend with a #5 fluted barrel in a rifle that weighs the same as the Outdoorsman. The LRH is basically a Rem Varmint contour fluted. All stocks are EDGE tech meaning they are made of 100% graphite. The Outdoorsman and the LRH-L weigh in at 8lbs and the LRH weigh 9lb 6oz.

Now for the answer, why that stock? It's the most popular stock we make and people love it. If it's not for you, you have the choice of two stock designs. We felt like with the three options we have provided something for everyone.
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  #28  
Old 12-27-2011, 01:06 PM
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Re: McMillan EOL Outdoorsman Long Range Rifle

Great answers guys. I think I'd pick a different one personally, but knowing that there are options is really cool, and might be a good selling point here. Thanks for your time.
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