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Major Problems

 
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  #22  
Old 05-10-2013, 02:12 AM
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 268
Re: Major Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayne B View Post
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Dry fire is excellent practice

Shooting alot of .22lr will help also, but that will make you relaxed when it comes to recoil management.

I notice when I shoot my .308 if I load the bipod, recoil is much more manageable.

anyways, hope you can take something from this.

Good luck!
Good point..I should have mentioned this and some other shooting fundamentals.

Yes, load your bipod, but how you load your bi-pod is more important.
This is hard to describe, but I will try me best.
Square your chest, shoulders, and upper body to the rifle and target. As you settle in on target rock your chest/shoulders slightly forward. Someone watching you should barely see the movement...The rifle should rock slightly forward, but you don't need to strain the bipod legs here!
You aren't so much loading the bipod as you are giving the rifle something consistent to recoil off of.

So you are in position and on target.
Close your eyes, take a few breaths and relax, then count to 5.
The sight is off target isn't it?
See where your rifle is pointed? That is your Natural Point of Aim. Carefully adjust your body position until you get it right. This is a learned skill...so teach yourself!
If you want to be a precise shooter the buck stops here.

When the environmentals are right squeeze off the shot.

So how do you know when you have it wrong?
1) The rifle will crow hop left or right under recoil...When I said square I meant perfectly square. You will have to experiment with contact points and slight body position changes. Make sure your trigger finger/pull is 90 degrees to the bore axis. Do not choke the hell out of the rifle.
2) The rifle crow hops 12:00
Ever wonder why you randomly sail bullets over the target?
Your contact point or center of gravity is too low.
Until you get the rifle recoiling the same every time you are sending the bullet to slightly different zip codes. I can tell you about it, but you must perfect this feel and skill for yourself.

How do you know when you have it perfect?
Your upper body absorbs and completely absorbs/dampens recoil and the rifle moves very little.
After the rifle impulse your sight comes back on target and you get to see the bullet trace/impact through your scope.
When you get it right you will feel that Jedi warrior thing!
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  #23  
Old 05-10-2013, 07:02 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 449
Re: Major Problems

I shot a lot of rimfire competition and for me this could have developed a flinch when shooting heavier recoiling rifles. It was easy to correct due to the form and discipline instilled in rimfire position shooting. On each shot I had to tell myself to use more of a firm hold appropriate to the recoil of the rifle, and wait for the recoil which I knew would not hurt me or cause discomfort.
Iím a firm believer that you need to practice with the tool you are going to use and having the problems with. It is natural progression when you get to the 7mm rem or Lapua you have to work up to it and it wonít be a problem, if you jump to it, this can cause problems. Recoil is something only you can gauge some donít feel it some do and some donít know they do (subconsciously)
If it doesnít hurt you should be able to overcome it with concentration and thinking your way through the shot.
Just my .02 but I donít believe in using a .22 with no recoil to correct a recoil flinch, thatís like training on a moped and then trying to jump on a top fuel drag bike.

Doubling up with plugs and muffs canít hurt either, it will help eliminate blast and outside noise and direct concentration on the things you need.
It would also help to know how the flinch developed, was it when you started shooting a 7mm? if so what were you shooting before that, rifle cal. weight etc. I don't like recoil but I manage a 338 set up properly with a brake with no problem.
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  #24  
Old 05-10-2013, 07:56 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: SW Montana
Posts: 4,498
Re: Major Problems

Watch the videos that Darrel Holland has put out and it will help you get shot to shot consistency. Running a dummy round every once in a while to see if you flinch isn't bad but regularly getting bush whacked by a live round will only add to what you have to over come.
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  #25  
Old 05-10-2013, 08:17 AM
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Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 9
Re: Major Problems

Rimfire - I 'suspect' my problems are tied to an experience I had several years ago at a range just outside Plains Montana.

I was offered the opportunity to shoot a .350 RM on a very light weight stock, maybe it was the model 600?? but I don't remember exactly. I believe the barrel was 18-20 inches; very short and no muzzle brake.

Anyways, I wasn't prepared for the recoil and I got a pretty nasty scope bite above my right eyebrow...took a couple of stitches to get it to close together. Owner got a good laugh and I got a good lesson in humility and an incredible black eye.

This was years ago so I can only suspect that this was, at least in part, the beginning of my problems.
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  #26  
Old 05-11-2013, 06:02 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: NW Florida Piney Woods
Posts: 237
Re: Major Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangerpl View Post
Rimfire - I 'suspect' my problems are tied to an experience I had several years ago at a range just outside Plains Montana.

I was offered the opportunity to shoot a .350 RM on a very light weight stock, maybe it was the model 600?? but I don't remember exactly. I believe the barrel was 18-20 inches; very short and no muzzle brake.

Anyways, I wasn't prepared for the recoil and I got a pretty nasty scope bite above my right eyebrow...took a couple of stitches to get it to close together. Owner got a good laugh and I got a good lesson in humility and an incredible black eye.

This was years ago so I can only suspect that this was, at least in part, the beginning of my problems.
I used to own one of those back before they made the Model Seven and it' kicked the snot out of me so badly that I didn't even miss it when it was stolen... LOL

Your buddy was cruel... It injured more than your face and your pride... It probably developed a flinch that will be hell to overcome.

Bob
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If it's long it can't be wrong... LDHunter (Long Distance Hunter) from the Piney Woods of NW Florida. I hunt clearcuts for scrawny whitetails... ;)
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  #27  
Old 05-11-2013, 08:35 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: The cold part of Montana
Posts: 1,390
Re: Major Problems

Over coming your flinch has been well covered so I won't bother with that. I don't see hardly anything but 1 post about your eye watering and eye fatigue though. I believe what is happening here is your ocular lens is not focused, most scopes are made so you can focus your ocular lens. Here's what you do.

get in position behind your rifle (unloaded). Focus on some distant object, then look through your scope, the image should be instantly clear with your eyes relaxed (probably fuzzy right). You'll need to adjust it then, it focuses the same as the right eye diopter on your bino's. Just keep working on it until you can look at you distant object with your eyes relaxed, then look through your scope and see a clear picture without your eye putting out any effort, and you don't want that split second for your eye to adjust to the scope. No adjustment for your eye is the point. In my experience once your ocular lens is adjusted to your eye you don't need to mess with it again.
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Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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  #28  
Old 05-11-2013, 02:46 PM
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 268
Re: Major Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe King View Post
Over coming your flinch has been well covered so I won't bother with that. I don't see hardly anything but 1 post about your eye watering and eye fatigue though. I believe what is happening here is your ocular lens is not focused, most scopes are made so you can focus your ocular lens. ...................
I'm pretty sure his eyes are watering as a part of the flinch.
One nasty scope bite and your subconscious wants no part of it.
I had a bad experience with a 340Wby that gave me the same problems.

Ranger
The 350 is a barky little thing and has wrecked the shooting of lots of guys.
Little gun...nasty bite!
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