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LR, wind, and mountains

 
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  #8  
Old 03-25-2013, 06:46 PM
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Location: Meridian, Idaho
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

6.5-284.
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  #9  
Old 03-25-2013, 08:35 PM
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Location: Blackfoot, Idaho
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

Brent,

I'm with you on the wind thing. I have several "hides" from which I regularly shoot. Distances reach beyond 1100 yards. Each one is different terrain.

After two years of shooting at hide #1, I generally multiply my wind correction by 1.5 to 1.8. This gets the first shoot closer than using the measured wind at the hide without the correction.

The wind is usually blowing from left to right with velocities typical for Idaho. Even with dead still wind at the hide I have to compensate at least a min or min and a half @ 1200 to hit the mark. More practice coming this spring (whenever that is) and summer.

This is across a large canyon that is not quite parallel to wind direction. I have passed several shots at elk there due to lousy wind conditions.

I tried a spotting shot once but learned that our local elk are well educated to what a bullet impact is.

The other two hides are more open with only rolling terrain but at a pretty decent down angle. We'll see what spring and summer brings at these location.

It took me quite awhile to learn to not over focus on the reticle and target. When my windage impact was way unexpected I learned to observe everything going on in the field of view. It turns out, for me at least, good optics is more important for observing grass movement than observing game.

Also I don't think one has to shoot all that much to improve. When attempting to make EVERY practice shot hit the POA spot on I might get 4 shots off in 30-45 minutes. It takes a lot of study and concentrated glassing to learn which range has the dominant wind affect. I've learned that it is not always the closest wind that has the largest affect. Usually but not always.

BTW, nice cat and great shooting.
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  #10  
Old 03-25-2013, 10:02 PM
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

You might try corresponding with Bryan Litz, young guy in MI who wrote "applied ballistics for long range shooting". He apparently has a portable wind meter setup where he can have several meters to get wind data across a given area. I believe each meter transmits wirelessly. It would be cool if a system of such meters could be setup to get a feel for how the wind behaves in a particular area that one is expecting to hunt.
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  #11  
Old 03-25-2013, 10:19 PM
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Location: Meridian, Idaho
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

Good info and thanks for responding. I am very new to LR and spent the past 30 years working on my archery skills. There is always room for improvement and this addicting challenge is showing me just how much.

I will continue to use my glass to help me identify wind movement as you do. I tend to do a lot of glassing with my binos and spotting scope and find myself more and more watching vegetation movement. Kind of weird telling people I am watching the wind.
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  #12  
Old 03-25-2013, 10:41 PM
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Location: SW Montana
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

Shooting in the mountains is about as fun and challenging as it gets, we spend most of the year seeking out challenging locations to shoot. In my area the prevailing wind is the key factor, to figuring out how the wind moves through the area, once you find the key in your area I think then a guy can almost visualize the air moving like water over the region. Getting out in a snow storm that you can watch the air compress over saddles or create huge up drafts and swirls coming up the back side of a large draw definitely gives you a real good look at what's happening. The crappier the weather the funner the shooting

I get almost no indicator of vegetation here but you hear the wind change in the upper flow that is in the tops of the pines even if you can't feel it you can hear it in a lot of the terrain I shoot.
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  #13  
Old 03-26-2013, 08:18 AM
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Re: LR, wind, and mountains

Another thing I found interesting is the ground level wind vs bullet path wind. It makes since to watch the tops of trees for wind indicators. For example, I held me kestrel at shoulder level and then reached way up, then handed it to my 6'4" buddy. The difference from my normal reading to level to his stretched out was 3 mph. This reading was on a open finger up from a plateau.
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