Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Long Range Hunting & Shooting

Long Range Hunting & Shooting Nightforce Optics


Reply

Idaho muzzleloader definition

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #8  
Old 12-31-2007, 04:00 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,143
There is certainly a BIG difference between "primitive arms" and "muzzleloaders", at least the muzzleloaders that are prevelent today.

As cartridge loaded firearms & bow hunting equiptment have advanced so has the regulations which govern them. New equiptment has become the order of the day and the Game Commissions have not sought to ban them, but rather work with them.

IMO we should maintain a primitive arms season where scopes, sabots, pellets, 209's, etc are not permitted while still recognizing that most muzzloader-hunters would still like to have an opportunity to use their prefered modern muzzleloaders without having to use them in the same season that conventional modern arms are allowed.

I'd suggest splitting the muzzleloader season into segments which meet both goals. I believe that PA has already done something similar with their seasons. Lets face it - you could hunt with a bow during the rifle season (in most states) but who really wants to do that. It would have been the death bell for bowhunting. A primitive arms season should come immediately after the bow season and before any other season which allows the use of more modern equiptment. The primitive arms season should be fairly short as long as the participation level is low. Should that change (and it probably would) the seasons could easily be ammended to meet demand.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-31-2007, 04:42 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Potomac River
Posts: 5,059
Well, just to swim against the current.

I put away my percussion cap 54 cal Hawken when I could not longer see well enough to shoot 100 yards with the iron sights. I had an 8 pt buck at 100 yards and could not see the sights and him and so I gave up the sport then. The regulation change that allowed me to hunt with a scope caused me to come back to the sport. I do not normally kill any deer with a muzzleloader so it really doesn't make much difference to the deer herd. Nor would it really make much difference to me if the scope was made illegal again being as I am just as happy hunting squirrels as I am muzzleloading hunting, but it would save me a $20 muzzleloading stamp and having to clean the rifle three or four times a year.

The comment I made last year to the Idaho Fish and Game on bowhunting was that if they wished to continue to reduce the number of hunters that participate in the sport then they shouold just keep the letoff at 65% and as the hunters get older and their shoulders and roatator cups get bad they will be force to quit. If on the other hand Idaho wished to keep its hunting population numbers up then they should look at what us older hunters require inorder to keep hunting and one thing is to allow 80% letoff so those of us with shoulder injuries have a better chance to participate.

And in case you have been deluding yourself about it, you aren't getting any younger either and sooner or later you will understand my point of view.

I have no vested interest in the idaho Muzzleloader regs so I will not comment.
__________________
The Smokin Fur Rifle Club
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-31-2007, 08:38 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Fairfax County, Va
Posts: 683
This debate will continue as long as technology continues to make improvements on all of our hunting equipment. I am not trying to date myself, but I remember have some very heated discussions on how the "compound bow" would be the ruination of bowhunting, and that they should only be allowed during the "Rifle Season". Now this was with bows that had at best a 50% let off.
It will be up to those who get involved with their state Fish & Game Departments on the regulation process that will determine the speed at which the regs keep pace with the advancing technology.
Dave
__________________
"How a politician stands on the Second Amendment tells you how he or she views you as an individual... as a trustworthy and productive citizen, or as part of an unruly crowd that needs to be lorded, controlled, supervised, and taken care of."
--Rep. Suzanna Gratia Hupp (TX)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-31-2007, 10:08 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 670
New technology muzzleloaders are becoming capable of taking game up to and beyond 200 yards. This kind of equipment belongs in the rifle season. If you don't like it sell it and buy a rifle. I look at this alot like the industry I work for, Golf. In the golf industry things just keep getting better and better. That's why the PGA regulates what you use. Otherwise people would be hitting 600 yard drives eventually.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-01-2008, 01:20 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Memphis, TN. Soon to be Casper, WY.
Posts: 494
Mississippi recently changed their law to allow BP cartridge rifles during the muzzle loading season. I'm fuzzy on the details but the H&R Handy Rifle is legal in 45-70 calibler. Go figure.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-01-2008, 01:16 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormrider View Post
Mississippi recently changed their law to allow BP cartridge rifles during the muzzle loading season. I'm fuzzy on the details but the H&R Handy Rifle is legal in 45-70 calibler. Go figure.
I recently hunted whitetails in N.C. with a few of the good ol' boys from Mississippi. They told me about this new regulation. They said the the NEF 45-70's sold faster than they are being shipped into the state. Waiting lists are forming at most dealers. Allowing the use of cartridge firearms during the muzzleloader season will kill the sport of muzzleloader hunting IMO. Bad idea if you ask me.

linksmechanic - "New technology muzzleloaders are becoming capable of taking game up to and beyond 200 yards. This kind of equipment belongs in the rifle season. If you don't like it sell it and buy a rifle. ......."

I'd be interested to know just where you would draw the line between allowable accessories/equipt and that which you would prohibit for muzzleloader hunting.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-01-2008, 01:50 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wilmington NC
Posts: 4,201
Stop the stupidity.

:mad:I have seen the same debate going on for years and the only winners are the anti-hunters.

They love to see division in the ranks of bowhunters(ie traditional vs compounds vs crossbows) and the same arguements in muzzleloaders.

Lets face facts, hunters are decreasing in numbers and the Humane Society and other anti-hunter groups readily support every restriction that they can get installed.

Quote:
That's why the PGA regulates what you use.
Not really in context statement. I can use any club 365 days a year and on any course. Not just this course here and during sept only!!!

BuffaloBob is right, we are all getting older and I for one am no longer comfortable pulling my 67" recurve in dead of winter after sitting on stand for 3 hrs in 10degrees.

Why do you want to be a "willing accompliace" to the anti hunters agenda? It is a losing propostion for all hunters and hunting!!!!!

Really, Just what does it matter to you if someone else takes a deer/elk with a round ball, conical or sabot using smokeless or Blackpowder? A: NOT A DAMN DIDDLY SQUAT

Now I have a custom 32 cal Kentucky caplock squirrel rifle, custom 44 cal tenn PoBoy, 50 cal Hawken and a 50 cal inline. The PoBoy is on the way to be rebored to 45 cal and for conicals.

I have longbows, recurves, compounds with wood, carbon, and aluminum arrows. I have taken deer with a self bow and flint heads.

However, it is my choice what I want to hunt with that day and circumstance.

Where does the stupidity end by playing into the antis hands all the time?

In order for it to be really primitive, should not I have to knap my own flints, grind my own powder and cast my own balls, with no prelubed patches and cut with a patch knife. Doubt anyone here is doing that. But unless you do, got to go into the rifle season now?

Our job is to put as many hunters in the field using whatever method and tool that they feel comfortable with, otherwise our grandchildren will only be able to read about hunting and definitely not in the PC schools.

BH

Last edited by BountyHunter; 01-01-2008 at 03:50 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Idaho muzzleloader definition
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
donut - cookie definition HUAINAMACHERO Humor 1 04-23-2010 07:56 AM
The definition of a trophy J E Custom General Discussion 15 09-26-2009 03:10 PM
Idaho finalizes Muzzleloader Definition billtyler Long Range Hunting & Shooting 0 01-24-2008 03:53 PM
Newbie question: definition of MOA? kevral Long Range Hunting & Shooting 2 02-10-2002 05:57 AM
Definition of Long Range? jhendri2 Long Range Hunting & Shooting 11 12-31-2001 02:05 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC