Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Long Range Hunting & Shooting

Long Range Hunting & Shooting Nightforce Optics


Reply

Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-17-2005, 09:27 AM
Official LRH Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Fort Shaw, Montana
Posts: 6,831
Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

Well, we headed out Saturday morning, 11 of us and headed down to Shoshone Idaho for a few days of Russian boar hunting. Got settled in Saturday night, checked all the gear and got some reast before the hunt started Sunday morning.

Got up early Sunday and headed out to the hunting area which is roughly 2 square miles and covered with 4 foot high sage brush. The terrain is slightly rolling with several rock formations that are slightly elevated over the rest of the area.

We all headed out in seperate directions, 10 bow hunters and some crazy fool with a long range rifle.

My plans were to scout out the high spots for locations where I could use the 270 Allen Mag to reach out to hopefully 800 yards but I was really hoping for at least 600 yards as a minimum.

On the first rock formation it became clear that this was not going to be easy. I glassed for about an hour or so and did find a mixed heard of sheep and glassed several pigs but there were no rams in the herd that interested me and the pigs were still in the tall sage and not moving much.

The owner told us that he had expanded the hunting area by adding 400 acres to the north end so I decided to take the mile hike over to a large hay stack which would give me a good view of this new hunting area to see what potential it had for long range shooting.

On the way I jumped enough pigs to always keep me on guard. Most were nesting sows which really got exciting a couple times as they simply hold their ground to protect their piglets. Fine with me, no desire to get into a debate with a 200 lb sow about who needs to move!!

Well, I made my way over to the hay stack with all my gear and climbed up to take a look over the new area. Just taking a quick glance looked very promising with several large Russians feeding in a meadow several hundred yards away. There was also a smaller opening, roughly 400 square yards in area much farther out.

I got settled in on top of the bails and pulled out the binos to do some initial glassing. Most of the pigs were sows with little ones so they were off the table as far as shooting. As I glassed the farther meadow I saw several mouflon ewes feeding on the fresh grass coming up. I also spotted something that looked a little odd so I pulled out the 20-60 spotter and set it up for a better look.

What I was seeing was the tops of the curls of two large rams bedded just over a small rise on the far end of the opening. I took several ranges of the opening with the Leica 1200 and had a hard time getting any range readings simply because there was nothing really in the area to range.

I went back to the spotter and just watched the rams trying to get a better idea of exactly how large they were. Over 30 minutes or so I got several glimpses of the rams as they would lift their heads every once in a while enough to get a clear view of their curls and then they would drop back down.

They were both large rams. The one on the left looked nearly identical to the one I had harvested the year before on the same ranch but the ram on the right was noticably heavier and longer as well. I guessed him at a 30" curl length and decided I would simply camp out here and wait the ram out until he stood up.

After another hour or so a small group of ewes walked by the rams and the larger of the two stood up. I could clearly see from the bottom of his chest up and he was a very large ram. He also had very distinct face markings. It was extremely dark, basically black with very defined white patches on his eyes, nose and chin. Made him stand out very clearly not to mention his horns were pretty easy to pick out.

I grabbed the range finder and tried to get a reading but was having trouble doing so as they were really just out in a grassy flat basically on the same plain as I was. Not being very large animals anyway(80-90 lbs) there just is not much for a laser to bounce off from.

Every once in a while I would get a measurement. After getting 5 readings that ranged from 920 to 926 yards I set the rifle up for the shot. Set the objective and leveled the rifle. I was shooting off 10x with the Weaver 4.5-14 tactical which offered a very high quality sight picture even on this size game at +900 yards.

I could just barely feel a breeze coming from my right so I held a 1/2 mil into the breeze and tickled the trigger. With the lack of recoil, it was easy to watch as the big 169.5 gr reached its mark and the ram simply dropped behind the small rise.

I was very happy!!!

The herd scattered into the tall sage brush for cover but really had no idea what had just happened. As I was about to find out, I had no idea what had just happened either!

I packed up my gear and climbed off the hay stack and started walking out to the ram thinking happy thoughts. I looked up and saw a single sheep walking across the opening toward the sage brush, slowly but steadily.

I glassed the sheep and sure enough it was the ram I had just killed, I thought!

I frantically tried to get a range on the ram but could not. Instead I turned around and ranged the hay stack and subtracted that range from teh 925 yards I had shot at just minutes before. 850 yards is what I figured and quickly set up and sent another 169.5 gr Wildcat down range. This time the shot topped the rams shoulder by roughly 10" or so from what I could tell and startled the ram when the bullet landed behind him and he trotted into the sage and safely into the herd.

I was totally baffled as to what the problem was. Just two days before the 270 Allen Mag was busting milk jugs from 500 to 1000 yards consistantly. I wondered if I had bumped the scope or if I had just pulled both shots. I had no idea where I could have hit the ram on the first shot to drop him like that only to see him run off with no ill effects to be seen. I thought to myself, "These damn things aren't that hard to kill!!"

After 10 minutes or so I figured I better walk up and see if I could figure out what had happened on the first shot.

I got up and started walking again. I had covered a couple hundred yards when I noticed the ewes were moving back out into the opening to feed. Extreme range shooting is great, the animals rarely get spooked and had these sheep known I was there, I would never had seen then again in the tall sage brush.

The herd was moving back out pretty much single file so I set up the rifle and spotter to try to find the ram and basically determine what I would do next. Now range was of little concern, this was more a wounded animal recovery situation as far as I was concern.

25 to 30 sheep entered the opening with several rams requiring a second hard look but when the ram I had shot at came out of the sage near the end of the herd, it was clear he was the one I had shot at. The combination of his long deep curls and face markings made it easy again to pick him out.

I ranged him again, this time the readings were dead consistant, 610, 611, 610 yards for three in a row. I looked up the hold on the scope tube and settled into the rifle. The hold was the second mil dot down for a dead hold at 615 yards so I placed that dot on teh ram and waited for him to clear from a couple young rams. The younger rams moved on and the old ram turned directly toward me.

With the dot centered on his right shoulder to allow for the slight breeze I tripped the big 270 Allen Mags trigger and watched as there was no mistake this time of a very solid hit. The ram was simply knocked on his rear, he recovered, stumbled a couple steps and fell over dead.

The sound of the impact was just awsome as it was on the Fallow Buck in Colorado with the 257 Allen Mag, The heavy Wildcat Bullets retain so much velocity and energy that they are simply amazing at long range impacts.

I was very happy the ram was down and slipped another round in the rifle and watched the ram which I could see on the open meadow for several minutes just to make sure he was not going to suprise me again.

There was no movement so I headed up to see what I had finally put on the ground. On teh hike up to the ram I was very happy with the 610 yard one shot kill but I was still running everything though my mind to try to figure out what had happened at the 925 yard shot.

When I approached the ram it all became very clear what had happened. On his left horn, on the bottom of the top of his curl was a significant amount of blood coming out of his horn. I could not figure out what this was from until it dawned on me that I had hit him in the horn at that first 925 yards which knocked down for a couple minutes but with no real damage to the ram.

Taking some rough measurements I figured that the shot was 12 to 13" high from what the rifle should have been hitting at that range and had no idea why, especially considering the fact that the 610 yard hold was basically dead on the money.

I took several pictures of the ram and rifle and then hiked out to where the ram was when I shot the first time and ranged back to the hay stack, 860 yards!!!

I was suspecting this, I turned around and ranged to the sage brush directly behind where the ram was roughly 60 yards!

Yes add those two together and you get the range I was shooting for, 920 yards. I was getting readings from the sage behind the ram and as such I was taking the wrong hold for the range the ram was at which resulted in a high miss.

Just goes to show you that an accurate range measurement is simply critical for taking shots at these ranges and I learned yet another valuable lesson that if you can not get repeatable, consistant range measurements, you should not take the shot. Lesson learned and I will not rely on speratic readings ever again in the field.

The ram was very large with full 30" curls and 9 3/4" bases. Three inches longer then my previous ram and 1/2" heavier as well so it should score very well as my other ram scored in the the 45 to 50 rank in the SCI records at that time.

Here are some pics of the old boy.







On this pic you can see the exit of the shot that hit the horn. I was suprised the ram fell to this hit but if he was totally relaxed I suspect that would be quite the strain on the neck and head.







I hiked back to pick up the quad and hauled the ram back to the trucks. On teh way I ran into several of my hunting partners who had a couple Boars on the ground. As we chewed the fat about the Ram hunt I noticed several nice sized boars walking up a dry creek bed about 150 yards away. I decided that I would try to sneak in and try to take one with my Sig M245 45 ACP which I had loaded with handloaded 230 gr Golden Saber HP bullets.

I got down in front of the group of pigs and tucked in under a sage bush and waited for the boars to walk by in the creek bed. To my suprise they did but on my side of the wash. They were roughly 5 yards away and here I am laying on my belly with no real good way to get the hell out of there if they decided I was not something they wanted near them.

I waited till five of the pigs passed, two sows and three boars, all roughly 175 to 225 lbs. The last pig in the group was around 200 lbs and was a young boar which would be great for eating. I figured I would be a bit safer letting most of the herd pass before I touched off the 45 in their ear!!

The boar slowly walked out in front of me and stopped and looked directly at me as I let the little 45 ACP bark. The hit was perfect(I hope at 5 yards!!!) and the boar whirled into the sage and fell over within 10 yards. I found the Golden Saber just under the off side hide fully expanded. IT had performed perfectly and I had a great eating pig.

I get nearly as much out of handgun hunting as I do long range hunting so I was able to get some of both in on this hunt and it was a great time.

I was a bit disappointed with the miss at 925 yards but also learned alot as well so it was a good hunt. No half mile kills yet for the Allen Mags but they are coming. Had I gotten an accurate range I feel it would have been a done deal but coulda, woulda, shoulda don't cut it!!

Perhaps the next adventure will result in this but even if it does not the Allen Mags are proving extremely proficient in the field so I could not be happier.

Good Shooting!!

Kirby Allen(50)
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-17-2005, 09:50 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Yakima, Washington
Posts: 3,832
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

Kirby:

Fantastic! Sounds like it just keeps getting better and better with the Allen Mags. That's a great looking ram.

I had some similar results with two different range finders and ranging at long ranges. Since I switched to the Swarovski Iíve had no problems ranging out to 1600 yards and on animals and normally hard to range objects up to 1200 yards. Give the Swaro unit a try and I think youíll like it.
__________________
ss7mm
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-17-2005, 09:56 AM
Official LRH Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Fort Shaw, Montana
Posts: 6,831
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

SS7mm,

I was thinking that same thing as I was sitting on top of that hay stack as I remember Shawn C and some others saying very good things about the Swar. RF.

I think I will need to invest in one of these. Good to see you have one, you will be able to put it to full use with that new 7mm coming your way here in a few months!!

Thanks for the reply!

Kirby Allen(50)
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-17-2005, 11:38 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 198
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

wow! way cool,now thats a gun barrel [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-17-2005, 01:03 PM
Official LRH Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Fort Shaw, Montana
Posts: 6,831
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

Bucknutz,

Yes, she has a pretty long pipe, 30"+ the brake. This is what I call my Extreme Heavy Sporter. It is built on a Savage receiver basically as an experiment to see how accurate I could get this receiver to shoot. As you can see there is no Savage barrel locking nut system and the barrel is fitted in the same fashion as a Rem 700. Is this system better, don't know but this rifle sure shoots well.

The rifle as seen in the pics weights right at 11 lbs. Not overly heavy and welcome for extreme range shooting but for the +4 mile hike I put in that day it was a bit heavy when you add the weight of my pack and all my accessary gear, spotter, binos, rangefinder, knives, camera, extra water, gets a little heavy.

I am designing a new "Extreme Light Sporter" as we speak. The first one will be a 257 Allen Mag. I already have the barrel which is a 30" #5 contour compared to the #6 Pac Nor on the 270 Allen Mag. The #6 Pac Nor splits the difference in size between the Lilja #7 and #6 so it is a pretty heafty barrel.

The Lilja #5 is quite slim for a full 30" and as such I had Dan flute the barrel with his heavy 50 BMG style flutes to help control barrel vibration as well as drop weight. Simply using this barrel will drop nearly 2 lbs off the rifle alone bringing the rifle weight to right at 9 lbs ready to hunt.

This barrel was the very first barrel built with the new 1-7" tooling I had Dan get for the 257 Allen Mag. Not only does it work great with this horse of a round but will turn the likes of the 257 Wby and 25 WSM into true extreme range rounds with the use of the new 257 ULDs on the market like the 142 gr and huge 156 gr ULD RBBT Wildcat bullets.

On top of that I will be using a McMillan stock. I have not decided which model yet, either the BDL model with the light Wby fill or one of their new Hunters Edge stocks with a weight of 25 oz!

This would bring the total rifle weight down to the 8 1/4 lb range. The only thing that has me wondering is how stiff the ultra light Hunters Edge stock will be in the forend.

Would much rather had an extra lb of rifle weight then a stock that is flexing on the bipod.This is the reason the stock has not been ordered yet.

Should still get in the 8.5 to 8 3/4 lb range with the Extreme Light Sporter. Either way you look at it, it will be vastly better then that heavy Savage based rifle I used on the last two hunts. Can not complain about performance though.

Getting full performance from these rounds in a light weight big game rifle is not always easy but I think things are getting tuned up very well. So far I have been very happy. I also offer the option for a 26" and 28" barrel with the usual velocity drop but increased manuverability if a hunter desires a livelier rifle.

Good Shooting

Kirby Allen(50)
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-17-2005, 01:16 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: colorado
Posts: 927
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

Kirby,
Congrats to you man. Sounds like a great time and hunt. Great pics too. I'm very happy that you included that high hit in your post. You can have easily left that out and we would have never known about it.. You've always been a straight up guy when talking to you and this just proves that even more. I can't wait to get my first Allen mag and do some long range hunting too. Thanks for the great story and pics.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-17-2005, 01:39 PM
Official LRH Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Fort Shaw, Montana
Posts: 6,831
Re: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........

Boman,

I guess I do not see a reason not to let you guys know exactly what happened on the hunt. I wanted a +1/2 mile one shot kill and tried to do it.

It simply did not work because of a set up flaw before the shot that was 100% my fault and not the rifle or the rounds.

I simply relied on questionable range data and the result was clear to see. Course I would rather guess long everytime to ensure a high miss then a low leg wound at that range.

Still, there is no room for guessing on a shot at that range. I justify the second shot as I believed the ram to be wounded more so then he was and I still had faith in the first 925 yard range. As such, using that information to figure the distance to the second shot, I again shot high from the original ranging error.

Not only do we need to hunt within our personal limits but also the limitations of our equipment. I did not do this on the first shot and felt it would be a good lesson for others getting into this area of extreme range marksmanship and hunting.

I have no reason to cover up a miss. I have done it before and I guarantee I will again. WIll also say that I learn as much if not more from my misses as my hits as long as you investigate why you missed and correct it for the next shoot.

Was the 925 yard shot unethical, I personally do not feel it was in any way. I believed the range was 925, I had tested the rifle well past that range on several occasions and knew it would easily group at that range well enough to land in the vitals of the ram. I knew I could make the shot and the conditions were nearly perfect and the shot was on an unexcited ram.

Only weak link was my range measurement and as they say you are only as strong as your weakest link. This could not be more true then in extreme range hunting.

I know I will remember that hunt from now on and I guess this is the reason I included the miss in the story. ITs a good lesson to learn.

If that same situation occurs on my next field test, I would instantly cut the distance until I got consistant, repeatible range measurements for the equipment I had with me.

I guess in my opinion, that first miss was just as important a part of the story as the hit was, maybe even more valuable to me and I hope to others as well.

Good Shooting!!

Kirby Allen(50)
__________________
Kirby Allen(50)

Allen Precision Shooting
Home of the Allen Magnum, Allen Xpress and Allen Tactical Wildcats and the Painkiller Muzzle brakes.

Farther, Faster and Flatter then ever before.

Web Page: www.apsrifles.com

allenmagnum@gmail.com
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Idaho Boar/Mouflon hunt results and pics..........
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Boar Hunt pic Jinx Hog Hunting 6 08-22-2008 02:49 AM
Texas Boar hunt Feb 2008 BROWN TROUT Hog Hunting 4 03-23-2008 12:03 PM
Idaho LR deer hunt results IdahoWoodsbummer Long Range Hunting & Shooting 7 11-05-2005 04:33 PM
Back from my boar hunt Fergus Bailey Long Range Hunting & Shooting 1 10-17-2004 10:45 AM
I won a wild boar hunt at Boyd Heaton Long Range Hunting & Shooting 6 12-24-2002 09:23 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC