Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Long Range Hunting & Shooting

Long Range Hunting & Shooting Nightforce Optics


Reply

How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #8  
Old 05-23-2013, 07:23 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The rifle range, or archery range or behind the computer in Alaska
Posts: 3,515
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

Your bullets will impact high on a sloped shot the same be it uphill or downhill. In both cases gravity's force is acting on something other than straight down on the bullet's bearing surface. Obviously if you fired straight up, gravity is acting on nothing except the nose. Straight down and it's acting entirely on the tail. Either way, they are only going to move in a straight line. The closer to these 'straight' lines the bullets are launched the less they're going to drop in relation to the target.

You have to remember, the rifle barrel is always tilted up in relation to your target on a horizontal shot. The bullets come up into or higher than the line of sight to hit a target. Aim your scope straight down 90 degrees and fire at a target that is at your scope's zero distance. Will you hit it? No. Why? Because you're aiming too high. The barrel is angled above your target. Likewise, aim your scope straight up. If you fire will you hit your target? No. Why? You guessed it, your barrel is angled too high in relation to the target. From the shooters perspective, the bullets in either case will hit above the targets. Up or down does not matter.

M
__________________
Long range shooting is a process that ends with a result. Once you start to focus on the result (where the shot goes, how big the group is, what your buck will score, what your match score is, what place you are in...) then you loose the capacity to focus on the process.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-23-2013, 10:34 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 608
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

That still does not make sense though...as I mentioned I have more experience as a golfer than a shooter, so let me use golf as an example. Say you take your flatest trajectory club (a driver) and hit it on a 5 degree upslope and a 5 degree downslope. The downslope shot is obviously going to go farther because the ball will stay in the air longer. Now I know there is more arc in any golf shot than a bullet trajectory, but the same general idea has to apply.

The same thing applies for a range finder that measures slope...uphill has to play longer and downhill plays shorter. Gravity obviously has it's influence. I don't see how it could work opposite of slope measuring range finders and a golf ball for that matter. I could be wrong, but it just does not make sense to me...?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-23-2013, 10:44 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The rifle range, or archery range or behind the computer in Alaska
Posts: 3,515
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

Nice example but golf clubs and balls are not apples to apples. In rifles, you have 3 key items with various angles at play. 1: slope angle. 2: scope angle. 3: barrel angle.

You'll get a handle on this soon.

M
__________________
Long range shooting is a process that ends with a result. Once you start to focus on the result (where the shot goes, how big the group is, what your buck will score, what your match score is, what place you are in...) then you loose the capacity to focus on the process.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-24-2013, 01:54 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 253
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Eichele View Post

You have to remember, the rifle barrel is always tilted up in relation to your target on a horizontal shot. The bullets come up into or higher than the line of sight to hit a target. Aim your scope straight down 90 degrees and fire at a target that is at your scope's zero distance. Will you hit it? No. Why? Because you're aiming too high. The barrel is angled above your target. Likewise, aim your scope straight up. If you fire will you hit your target? No. Why? You guessed it, your barrel is angled too high in relation to the target. From the shooters perspective, the bullets in either case will hit above the targets. Up or down does not matter.

M
That has got to be the simplest, easiest explanation I've ever read. Thanks Michael.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-24-2013, 11:49 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 151
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

Quote:
Originally Posted by cohunter14 View Post
I have been researching this because it is driving me nuts. I think everything that Rockymtn and Michael posted in their articles makes sense, but uphill shots should never 'play' shorter than a flat shot. With that in mind, I think this is what you need to do: If the target is above you, then the distance will be the adjacent side of the triangle and the slope distance will be the hypotenuse. Whereas, if the target is below you, then the hypotenuse will be the actual distance and the adjacent side will be the slope distance. Does that sound correct? Maybe that was in the articles and I just missed it...

Anyway, with all of that said, I think rangefinders that calculate slope do truly work then, which is what I wanted to know
Up or down doesn't really matter ( well it does a little but the distances at which it would matter have way more variables that would overcome any correction we would apply) you are only really concerned with the horizontal distance for your drop and the hypotenuse length of your triangle that you speak of for wind correction and spin drift.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-30-2013, 05:52 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 21
Re: How to Shoot Uphill and Downhill

COHunter14, I apologize it has taken me so long to respond. To answer you question directly, the adjacent side of the triangle which is the horizontal distance to the target is the distance most rangefinders give you when they compensate for the angle. I say most because very high tech rangefinders like the BR2 actually provide a full-on ballistic solution. In other words, these rangefinders have a ballistic program built into them and know what bullet your shooting and all sorts of other environmental data.

But if you look at a rangefinder like the Swarovski El Range, all it is doing to get the corrected distance to the target is doing the cosine math for you and giving you the adjacent side of the triangle which, again, is the horizontal distance to the target.

You are absolutely correct that if you use a standard rangefinder it will be giving you the hypotenuse or straight line distance to the target. You can then do the math yourself and figure out the adjacent side or horizontal distance to target and then use your method of choice for compensating accordingly.

I hope that helps.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
Do You Think Slingshots Should Be Legalized For Hunting Brown Bear?
Yes - 47.20%
911 Votes
No - 52.80%
1,019 Vote
Total Votes: 1,930
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC