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Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

 
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  #1  
Old 02-07-2013, 10:03 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2013
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Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

The bench with sandbags and a rest is one thing but how do you pull it off in the woods?


Here's what I like to do but it may not be a good idea. I like to trap the gun's fore-end between my hand and a tree and lean into it a little. This keeps me pretty still but I always wonder what the recoil is doing to the shot. I've wondered the same thing about bi-pod feet on less than dead flat ground. As the recoil sends the gun rearward, it also can deflect it a bit.
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  #2  
Old 02-07-2013, 10:57 AM
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Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

We don't have very many trees around here, so I am always trying one of three different things. If the terrain will allow for it I will us a coat or pack to get comfortable on. Option #2 is a harris bipod. Option #3 is a set of predator sniper stix that I always pack around with me when I am walking. I have been known to take some off hand shots as well when I jump game out of a coulee. I have tried to shoot off of telephone posts or fences in the past, but I play hell getting steady at all, so I have given that practice up
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  #3  
Old 02-07-2013, 11:09 AM
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Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 777funk View Post
The bench with sandbags and a rest is one thing but how do you pull it off in the woods?


Here's what I like to do but it may not be a good idea. I like to trap the gun's fore-end between my hand and a tree and lean into it a little. This keeps me pretty still but I always wonder what the recoil is doing to the shot. I've wondered the same thing about bi-pod feet on less than dead flat ground. As the recoil sends the gun rearward, it also can deflect it a bit.
Where your bullet hits has nothing to do with where your gun moved to after you pulled the trigger... That bullet leaves the muzzle before you ever feel any recoil or know what's happening. The only thing that can cause you to not hit, is you, or if your gun has a problem, like barrel wear, throat erosion, or scope is off. But if the gun and scope are in perfect working order, if you miss....It's all b/c you moved or flinched before you pulled the trigger.

Try breathing techniques and try being able to slow your heart rate back down and remain calm. It's what I do.
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"I'm just a peckerwood who lives in the hills with too many guns..." - Bob Lee Swagger

"Give me a minute...I'm good. Give me an hour...I'm great. Give me 6 months...And I'm unbeatable." - Col. Hannibal Smith

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildRose View Post
The 284 is to the STW what a tricycle is to a Ninja.
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Old 02-07-2013, 11:44 AM
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Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

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Originally Posted by MudRunner2005 View Post
Where your bullet hits has nothing to do with where your gun moved to after you pulled the trigger... That bullet leaves the muzzle before you ever feel any recoil or know what's happening. The only thing that can cause you to not hit, is you, or if your gun has a problem, like barrel wear, throat erosion, or scope is off. But if the gun and scope are in perfect working order, if you miss....It's all b/c you moved or flinched before you pulled the trigger.

Try breathing techniques and try being able to slow your heart rate back down and remain calm. It's what I do.
I guess I'm coming from a spring airgun perspective. Managing the recoil is make or break between an accurate shooter and a beginner. I would think to some degree recoil management would effect the shot placement of any gun, no?

In shooting springers if you hold the gun tight, you'll be all over the page. If you let the gun's recoil do it's thing (artillery hold) AND hold the gun the same every time, you get good groups.

Of course the speed of most powder burners is 2-3x that of a good magnum spring airgun (2500-3000 fps instead of just 800-1100 fps), but that in my mind would just reduce the amount of the effect of recoil on the gun's shot, not eliminate it. Am I not right there? It seems like I've seen rests and sandbags designed to have very little resistance/deflection on recoil... such as this one:

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  #5  
Old 02-07-2013, 11:48 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Wheat Field near Bennett, CO
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Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

+1

By the time you feel recoil, that bullet is gone gone.
I agree that it's hard to steady a rifle against a pole or a tree.

Try sitting down and bracing the rifle off your knees.
That's what I do.
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  #6  
Old 02-07-2013, 12:04 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,384
Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

Most of the time I shoot semi-free recoil for my .308. I use an artillery hold. The gun is rested properly on my shoulder (but very very lightly), and my hand is just barely on the grip....It's amazing how well a gun can shoot at the range when you let it do it's thing.
__________________
"I'm just a peckerwood who lives in the hills with too many guns..." - Bob Lee Swagger

"Give me a minute...I'm good. Give me an hour...I'm great. Give me 6 months...And I'm unbeatable." - Col. Hannibal Smith

Ignore everything I say, because I have a reading comprehension and memory problem...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildRose View Post
The 284 is to the STW what a tricycle is to a Ninja.
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  #7  
Old 02-07-2013, 01:52 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: West Central Idaho
Posts: 1,136
Re: Getting stable in the woods - How do You do it? Creativity thread!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 777funk View Post
The bench with sandbags and a rest is one thing but how do you pull it off in the woods?


Here's what I like to do but it may not be a good idea. I like to trap the gun's fore-end between my hand and a tree and lean into it a little. This keeps me pretty still but I always wonder what the recoil is doing to the shot. I've wondered the same thing about bi-pod feet on less than dead flat ground. As the recoil sends the gun rearward, it also can deflect it a bit.
Here in Idaho where I live and hunt it's so steep that getting prone or something similar is near impossible. Out to 300 yards I shoot off my knees. Years of practice has made that deadly for me. I wear a backpack 95% of the time hunting so if I have time to dial then a good rock pile or downfall to lean over with the pack under the rifle is what I do. Sometimes it as simple as sitting down and laying the rifle over a down tree.

Once a particular load is worked up and a drop chart proven all the practice I do is done using the things described above. I'm fortunate enough to live right where I hunt so the practice is real world.

I can't stress enough how important practice is. Hitting a bull at 500 yards in a snow storm leaning over a rock is a lot different than a target at 500 yards off a bench. I never shoot standing. Just too much movement
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