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De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

 
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  #8  
Old 10-22-2013, 09:14 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 614
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZShooter View Post
That was a bunch of good info, until I got to the pic of the fire! 60 degrees and a fire??? Really?? You Arizona folk crack me up!!! LOL!!!!! Just messin with you, but I couldn't let you get away with that
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  #9  
Old 10-23-2013, 06:18 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,267
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Yes it is funny and I noticed the thermometer too. Then I realized the fire under front porch near thermometer was influencing things. It was December with the morning temps in the high 30s. The meat comes out one piece at a time from the ice packed tub. My hands would get so cold I was glad to warm them up by the fire.
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  #10  
Old 10-23-2013, 05:49 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: blackfalds alberta
Posts: 132
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Ive cut meat and made sausage for going on 8 years now and the best way (fastest) for me is to hang the deer, tiger torch the small amount of hair off after skinning, the i "skin" the meat from brisket to spine. making 2 cuts on either side of the feather bones. You do this from the hip to where you cut the head off. From there you have prety much thewhole side of deer, almost boneless, on the table. You can pull the loin (backstraps) off by hand to cut up later, cut away all fat to toss out, and debone the shoulder and cube the neck meat.
Then all thats left is to debone the hips. Which is very fast if you know the correct seams to follow for having lean chunks for jerky. There is usualy a smal had full of mea that is missed. But its between the ribs and usually full of blood ant whatnot from gutting. So it doesnt matter all that much to clean the inside, other than the tenderloins.
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  #11  
Old 10-23-2013, 05:49 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: blackfalds alberta
Posts: 132
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Ive cut meat and made sausage for going on 8 years now and the best way (fastest) for me is to hang the deer, tiger torch the small amount of hair off after skinning, the i "skin" the meat from brisket to spine. making 2 cuts on either side of the feather bones. You do this from the hip to where you cut the head off. From there you have prety much thewhole side of deer, almost boneless, on the table. You can pull the loin (backstraps) off by hand to cut up later, cut away all fat to toss out, and debone the shoulder and cube the neck meat.
Then all thats left is to debone the hips. Which is very fast if you know the correct seams to follow for having lean chunks for jerky. There is usualy a smal had full of mea that is missed. But its between the ribs and usually full of blood ant whatnot from gutting. So it doesnt matter all that much to clean the inside, other than the tenderloins.

Hope that makes sense to all who read.
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  #12  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:53 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fredericksburg VA
Posts: 4,128
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

We take them straight to a hoist and gambrel IF time allows without gutting them.

Peel the hide back down to head. Depending on if you want to save the hide or not how you do it. Hook knives make quick work.

Use a fillet knife take out the loins from the hindquarters to the neck.

Off come the front shoulders

Make small incisions in the top of the stomach area near the hindquarters to get the small backstraps inside

use a filet knife and start just outside the tailbone and work down both sides of the pelvis bones thru the pelvis joint to the front of the hind quarter.

Each hindquarter will pop off, hanging on gambrel and carcass will fall to ground.

Use filet knife to work thru and around knees on front and hind quarters

Debone the neck and any extra meat.

Debone the quarters with the filet knife. Can be done with one piece of meat for each quarter.

Pop in bags and ice.

Dispose of carcass.

total time is 15-20 minutes. 3-4 big Midwest deer will fit in on 100 qt cooler
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2013, 09:59 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: SW Montana
Posts: 4,456
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Here is a picture of our cutting area that we've set up in my dad's garage. It has water and drains with a rail.
For me it all starts with a clean skinning job, then I wash the animal down and trim the edges of hair and dirt. There is almost no hair on the animal after this, maybe a dozen max!
Front shoulders are removed then one hind quarter is removed and hanged on a roller. Then flanks and back straps are removed, next the neck and then split the cut the spine with my knife and remove the pelvis from the last hind. Shoulders boned, back straps trimmed and cut, flanks and sides are cleaned, hinds are bones and cut to roasts and steaks.

I cut them very soon after skinning which is very soon after killing so I don't have to reskin my game, use water for cleaning hair of so no torch and no funky stuff and I remove the glands, it's the best quality wild game you can get!

I kinda idle now days so it takes more time than it used to a half hour or so for a deer or an hour or so for an elk. When I was cutting 60 a night there was five of us, three breaking and two of us cutting at 10 animal an hour average cut and wrap, elk and deer but we could hit a deer every three minutes if we were doing sausage animal that we just grind.

De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?-picture-001.jpg

The four tools you need, steel, 8in curved breaking knife, 6in semi stiff curved breaking knife and a sharp hook.

De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?-picture-003.jpg

Finished carcass.

De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?-picture-044.jpg
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  #14  
Old 10-28-2013, 04:56 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,267
Re: De-Boneing and Butchering. Whats your Process?

Biggreen,

Wow that is a very professional looking setup! Thanks for sharing.
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