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Bench shooting vs Bipod

 
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  #15  
Old 11-03-2013, 06:17 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,267
Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

Great thread.

I haven't noticed a POI difference between a bi-pod with bean bag or bench rest pedestal and rear bag.

I have noticed that some rifles will not shoot with the bi-pod and in each case the barrel channel had to be opened up a bit more. This is with a cheap injection molded stock as well as the lighter weight McMillan stocks.

I like to practice and verify finalized performance with a bi-pod and small bean bag.

I have noticed that if the rifle stock has a tactical ammo/cheek pad with Velcro straps, the straps give the bean bag a better grip on the underside of the stock. On some of my rifles with a very slick underside it is easier to get a good hold with the add on cheek piece system in place.

I use this one: Tactical Operations Ammo Cheek Pad Black┬*::┬*Long Range Accessories┬*::┬*Long Range┬*::┬*Tactical Works, Inc.
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  #16  
Old 11-03-2013, 08:34 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 67
Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

Well sense this post, I called Mike Davidson at Gunwerks, and he said this is very common. When ever they have classes they go through the the different steps of shooting, and the customer can see the difference of the POI just by shooting a different position. after shooting 3 guns this week, and reading all the post, My POI has gotten a hole lot better. On the bench I would not hold the gun, just aim and touch the trigger, Now I have a slight lean on the bi pod ( or push against the bi pod ) and holding the gun firmly and squeeze the trigger. Big difference. At 200 or 300 yds you don't notice it as much, but the further you go, it multiples fast.
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  #17  
Old 11-03-2013, 08:38 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Northeast
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Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

I have done a lot of shooting from various positions, with bipod, bag, bench, prone, and sitting with sport; with my two primary LR rifles, two 6.5x284's and a 300WM. I have no problem maintaining POI from these positions, but there are a few techniques that I needed to address to to this:

Whatever position,I try to get behind the rifle as much as possible and use a hard hold of about 10# without too much if any pressure of your cheek on the stock.

When setting up on any rest technique, right before the shot, slide the rifle rearward about an inch and check to be sure the rifle comes STRAIGHT back. No up/down, or angular movement. If it does moves off straight, so will your shot.

In the prone position I find it beneficial to set my leg height as high as possible to get close as close as possible to the rifles butt's contact area with my shoulder as when shooting from the bench or other non-prone position.

Using a bipod can be tricky, particularly on a bench. The idea of flexing the bipod is to be sure the rifle comes straight back for the 1/8-1/4" that's needed. On a bench, a Harris is generally set on it's lowest position and the legs won't flex as easily. The smooth surface won't grip the legs. The rifle can randomly slide, or bounce, if it slides the same way, your are OK. If it bounces you are not. The same can happen on hard surfaces when shooting with a bipod on the ground. Using a Harris on the ground, the extended position should allow the legs to grip and flex forward. I think is the single biggest advantage of the Atlas is the built in movement of 3/4" leg flex will work at any length or surface and eliminate the requirement to pay attention to it. I have no issues shooting off any bench surface with my Atlas and getting the same POI as shooting prone.

One note on the Atlas bipod. If you use the quick detach, make sure the pic rail is clamped tight. Not all pic rails have the same dimension and if too small, it will have side play that will effect accuracy. There is an adjustment screw on the QD clamp to adjust it. if you use Seekins pic rail with integral sling mount you may need to adjust the mount.

I would in no way claim these techniques to be gospel, but they have worked for me.
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  #18  
Old 11-03-2013, 12:51 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Maryville, Missouri
Posts: 109
Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

Good post Greyfox!

On most stocks, the bottom portion of the stock is angled from the grip to the pad. How do you keep a straight forward/rearward shift with these style of stocks?

Thanks!
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  #19  
Old 11-03-2013, 05:25 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Northeast
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Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

Quote:
Originally Posted by SenderoMan View Post
Good post Greyfox!

On most stocks, the bottom portion of the stock is angled from the grip to the pad. How do you keep a straight forward/rearward shift with these style of stocks?

Thanks!
I will place the smallish flat surface of the bag under the rearward end (last couple of inches)of the rifle butt. The toe of the stick should ride on the flat bag surface creating no angle. The hard hold against your shoulder helps maintain straight rearward movement of the rifle. The unsupported muzzle end requires more attention then the rear of the rifle, but it must be solid.
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  #20  
Old 11-04-2013, 11:03 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Meridian, Idaho
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Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

I do something similar, fair amount of pressure with proper alignment behind the rifle and try to get it come back into my shoulder vs down and under. It is rare that I have any shift in elevation from the ballastics program that is based off my zero. If you have elevation changes with a solid working load then it is usually the shooter. Regardless, I still think a person needs to shoot different positions to ensure zero does not change for them. If it does, work on form.
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  #21  
Old 11-05-2013, 04:39 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: NW Florida Piney Woods
Posts: 228
Re: Bench shooting vs Bipod

There are a lot of variables between bench vs prone shooting and between bench with sandbags and bipod prone shooting that are simply too various to compute.

The variations will lessen with heavier rifles and with heavier barrels and stiffer stocks. They will also lessen if you practice with both types of shooting but there is no substitute for approximating your hunting field conditions as closely as possible when you practice.

When I lived and hunted in Colorado almost all my shooting was with bipods both sitting and prone including sight in and load development.

Here in Florida now I find that a bipod is all but useless due to tall ground cover and the opportunity for prone shooting in field conditions is almost non-existent.

Our hunting leases have shooting houses with built in benches and we do most of our shooting right there for final sight in and practice.

For still and dog hunting we usually just sight in on a bench and verify standing or with improvised rests but shots are usually so short it's not a problem.

Shoot like you hunt.
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If it's long it can't be wrong... LDHunter (Long Distance Hunter) from the Piney Woods of NW Florida. I hunt clearcuts for scrawny whitetails... ;)
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