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Extreme Long Range Hunting & Shooting (ELR) Over 1,000 Yds.


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The importance of being Solid

 
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  #29  
Old 06-06-2012, 02:37 PM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

Always thought it was interesting to watch Bob Beck shoot on EOL TV. No scope level that I can see, off of a pack and left hand rested on top of scope. Obviously he gets the job done
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  #30  
Old 06-06-2012, 02:56 PM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tumbleweed View Post
Always thought it was interesting to watch Bob Beck shoot on EOL TV. No scope level that I can see, off of a pack and left hand rested on top of scope. Obviously he gets the job done
I've noticed this also but it isn't very often that he kills beyond a grand that way. In fact the instances I have seen him make kills past 1000 was when he was in texas and that was from an elevated blind and all bagged up and rested properly off a bench in the blind. But I could be wrong as well. In my shooting I have noticed that inside of 800 I can get away with a lot more and still shoot descent but past 800 its an all new ball game and I better have my ducks in a nice neat row.
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  #31  
Old 06-08-2012, 01:51 AM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

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Originally Posted by Broz View Post
Thats how I do it. I use form of my hold to be consistant as possible and let the rifle do its thing. Anytime I tri to muscle the rifle I imply bad inconsistant juju.

Jeff
I generally try to use the sling over my left arm in the field for just a little additional stability. If I'm unable to really get a good set up I use the sling for downward traction on the fore grip by looping it over my arm and just resting the rifle then in the palm of my left hand.

Sometimes in the field you just gotta make due with what mother nature provides so it can take some creativity.

I also use the same method if I have to shoot from a standing or kneeling position. This really helps increase stability for me.

With the injuries to my left arm and shoulder I have to do all I can for a little extra stability.

Using a short piece of rope doubled over and knotted, looped around a tree or fence post makes for a very good stable shooting stick as well. Just slip the rifle through the loop so that the stock is cradled in it so as to keep from putting any pressure against the barrel.

Like the Sgt. Major said, never go into the field without at least 12' of good rope.
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  #32  
Old 06-08-2012, 07:30 AM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

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Originally Posted by WildRose View Post
I generally try to use the sling over my left arm in the field for just a little additional stability. If I'm unable to really get a good set up I use the sling for downward traction on the fore grip by looping it over my arm and just resting the rifle then in the palm of my left hand.

Sometimes in the field you just gotta make due with what mother nature provides so it can take some creativity.

I also use the same method if I have to shoot from a standing or kneeling position. This really helps increase stability for me.

With the injuries to my left arm and shoulder I have to do all I can for a little extra stability.

Using a short piece of rope doubled over and knotted, looped around a tree or fence post makes for a very good stable shooting stick as well. Just slip the rifle through the loop so that the stock is cradled in it so as to keep from putting any pressure against the barrel.

Like the Sgt. Major said, never go into the field without at least 12' of good rope.

Wld Rose, you use these methods to shoot past 1000 yards?

Jeff
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  #33  
Old 06-08-2012, 07:47 AM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

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Originally Posted by Broz View Post
Wld Rose, you use these methods to shoot past 1000 yards?

Jeff
If I'm shooting off of a bipod at any range I'll loop the sling around my elbow so it's putting tension on my forearm and bicep creating something of a tripod effect. Remember I have side mounted QD slingmounts to carry and I'll just pop the front one out and put it on the bottom side in a more traditional mount style when I set up for a shot.

You'd be surprised at how much extra stability it gives you.

If I have a chance to really bag up it wouldn't be necessary or very workable.

I'd never take a thousand yard shot or farther unless I could really get set up properly.

Ideally I'd have bags under and on bothsides of the fore part of the stock and either rear bags or the accupod deployed on the rear. In that case My left arm is just like your's hooked under the rifle.

Now if I could just set up in a "nest" as a long range blind for most of my LR shooting it would be set up with the bags.

Most of my longest range shooting though comes when I'm having to improvise because I'm not blind hunting but working ridges and plateaus on Antelope or Muley hunts. In those cases packing sand bags along just isn't an option.
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  #34  
Old 06-08-2012, 08:38 AM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

Great Thanks for the reply, I understand what you do now. I only asked because this is in the 1000 plus (ELR) forum.

I do carry a redtac rear bag with me at all times. I would have to leave something else at home if needed to lighten up the pack. We have just spent 3 days shooting in the mountains and most of the shots (on rocks) were holding 1/2 moa accuracy. The majority of the shots were in the 800 to 1200 range with some time spent on some rocks at 1500 and 1800. Even my 300 win was able to keep them on a rock at 1800. I was impressed. These shots in mountain field conditions were taken with my method in post one using a rear bag. No hand on top the scope, no sling , just the cradle method.

Jeff
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  #35  
Old 06-08-2012, 08:54 AM
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Re: The importance of being Solid

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Originally Posted by Broz View Post
Great Thanks for the reply, I understand what you do now. I only asked because this is in the 1000 plus (ELR) forum.

I do carry a redtac rear bag with me at all times. I would have to leave something else at home if needed to lighten up the pack. We have just spent 3 days shooting in the mountains and most of the shots (on rocks) were holding 1/2 moa accuracy. The majority of the shots were in the 800 to 1200 range with some time spent on some rocks at 1500 and 1800. Even my 300 win was able to keep them on a rock at 1800. I was impressed. These shots in mountain field conditions were taken with my method in post one using a rear bag. No hand on top the scope, no sling , just the cradle method.

Jeff
Brother Jeff I have no question but that it worked as well for you as you say.

I was thinking of a better way to explain it since i don't have a way to take a picture of myself doing it.

Essentially what I'm doing is adding a great deal of weight to the rifle. My elbow is just sitting inside the loop of the sling.

When I raise up the butt to my shoulder it puts downward tension on the sling pulling the stock down.

I then just rest the palm of my hand against the stock to add a hair more tension.

If the butt then is rested on a rear bag or monopod, you can achieve a great deal of stability.

I'd rather go at it like that than to rest on a pack or just over a log.

Some of my hunting places are as rough as it gets with steep slopes, and more rocks than dirt or sand, especially when I'm in NM or far SW Texas.

One thing I did come up with for light weight sand bags was to take some shot bags, fill them with vermiculite, and sew them in thirds and quarters creating separate sealed chambers.

You can fold them, roll them, stack them, whatever and they weigh just about 20% of what sand would.

Still not ideal or as good as having a stack of sandbags and heavy bags on the sides against the rifle but on flat ground or easy slopes they can come in hand for getting that rear bag "just right"

They'll even make a decent cradle for the fore stock set on top of rocks if you have rocks of the appropriate size to work with.
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