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cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

 
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  #8  
Old 04-30-2013, 05:08 PM
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Location: Lake Fork, ID
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

With my occupation I get to fly a lot in the backcountry and using streamers we determine wind drift, up/down air, etc. I feel fortunate to be able to apply that knowledge to bullet flight
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  #9  
Old 05-01-2013, 10:14 AM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

You guys make me thankful to live on the plains. I drove 300 mi last weekend and elevation changed 14ft.
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  #10  
Old 05-03-2013, 09:25 AM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

When I was a student pilot and reading the wind section of the manual I remember the illistrations showing high and low pressures on the front and back sides of the ridges etc. I have a book that also targets back country flying and it addresses much of this. However, in a plane you are generally flying within areas the air is a bit more stable vs being relatively close to the ground. Not that any of this has made me a better wind reader but I have been thinking about it ever since I shot that mountain lion a month ago and how it all applies to the bullet path.

I noticed a transition from updraft, hide area, to down draft, within a relatively short distance down the slope of the finger I was on that day. I also noticed a pressure shift in kestrel. The pressure shift was not great enough at 1000 to make any difference but at 1500-2500 I do believe it needed to be accounted for. I have not shot beyond 1500 so I have no clue. ??

Back to the point, on the backside of mountain the wind tumbles in a clockwise rotation, creating up and down drafts. Have you guys noticed this and thought about how to account for bullet path relative the invisible air stream at say 100 feet off the deck?
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  #11  
Old 05-03-2013, 09:46 AM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

Illustration
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cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625-dsc00652-copy.jpg  
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  #12  
Old 05-03-2013, 12:54 PM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

Your photo is the down draft (I referred to them as burbles) that I am referencing in my original post. From my experience there is no updraft in the lee side, clockwise air. As far as detecting it, My first go to would be thermals, if those aren't present, your next best bet would practicing in those conditions and reconizing those lee side conditions. I will be on the lookout for them from here on out and put that mental slide in the shooting book for future situations that resemble it.

The pressure shift in the Kestrel I find interesting because it is the same air, so to speak, it is justing swirling off the ridge, I understand if your losing or gaining elevation, but if your ele. stays the same your pressure shouldn't fluctuate with moving air (unless a front is coming or going). Maybe someone else can chime in here and share
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  #13  
Old 05-03-2013, 01:07 PM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

I wonder if pressure is the wrong term. It is a differential for sure but.... since you experience with airplanes look at wing design. The air over the top of the wing has to travel faster then the air across the bottom and pressure differential is created which creates lift.

Another example might be the way sand or snow etc moves behind a wind block. To a degree the material moves toward the block, on the wind blocked side, and it lifted up, tossed around, and the cycle repeats. The turbulance created behind the block/rideridge line creates a disturbance that is unstable. I notice this area also will build and flush, in a cycle type fashion.

Thoughts? I don't mind being told I am full of crap either. I am learning and observing.
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  #14  
Old 05-03-2013, 01:08 PM
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Re: cross winds & downdrafts at 1150 & 1625

btw- That is my picture and illustration. Feel free to modify it and use it if you wish.
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