Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > PSE TAC 15/15i Crossbow Hunting Forum


Reply

TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #15  
Old 03-07-2011, 10:07 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 391
Re: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

Super 91,
YOU ARE THE MAN!!!!

There's nobody in the country that has these crossbows and their arrows pegged as well as yourself.

If people would begin listening to your postings and watching your video's they could stand to learn a whole lot and probably save themselves a great deal of pain and money.

Cheers for all your hard work and special thanks for your advice.


Jon
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-13-2011, 12:59 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 21
Re: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

jon henry info is very good.arrows vanes are still a problem,i am still putting
on new vanes alot.
leveling everything is important. i have a hha on bow,but still think bow has
problems.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-13-2011, 01:21 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: SW virginia
Posts: 82
Re: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

Jon has this stuff pegged, that is for sure. He has more knowledge in his pinky finger than I have in my whole noggin!

Try bare shaft tuning through paper to see if are shooting bullet holes. If not, adjust the rest to get the bow into perfect tune. Once you are shooting perfect bullet holes, then you will have to shoot each shaft to see its point of impact. Sort your shafts according the flight. This is assuming you do not have a spine tester.

I'm having pretty good luck with the glue from Firenock. It is 100% acetone solvable which is very nice. It flows very easily and you don't have to use but a very small amount to get awesome adhesion. Might be worth a try.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-13-2011, 08:47 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North West Washington
Posts: 80
Third Axis Leveling

There is another leveling issue that rears its ugly head comes when shooting up or downhill at extended ranges. The archery industry refers to this as leveling in the third axis.

If the level assembly is not perfectly perpendicular to the arrow, when holding the bow at an angle the bubble will drift either up or down in the glass. The shooter then compensates by adding cant to the bow and succeeds in adding windage problems to the point of impact.

If you are using a scope with a “cross hair” reticle a plumb bob can be hung from a tree limb and sighted through the scope while pointing the bow upward. With the string aligned to the vertical “hair” of the reticle the bubble is observed. If the bubble is not centered, the third axis needs adjustment.
__________________
“The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter can not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.”

Col. Jeff Cooper
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-13-2011, 09:05 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 391
Re: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

Hi Everyone,
As Super 91 has pointed out already, getting good vane adhesion is going to be difficult and take some extra time and work to over come. Please allow me to attempt a simple explanation as to why this is happening. Some people have stated that PSE has come back with a statement that the manufacture is not using a good glue. This is only partially true.

Bob (Super 91) and I are both aware that a few years ago PSE bought out a very large arrow manufacturer named Carbon Force. Carbon Force is now a division of PSE and the producer of the TAC Arrows.

This said, PSE did not exactly lie, they just didn't explain the entire story.

Next, The TAC arrow shafts are being created from a brand new type of carbon known as Carbon Filament. Carbon Filament has some very positive features that make it exceptionally strong, very straight and having no specific glue spot that typically creates a stiff line which we know as the arrows spine.

These new properties make spine identification much more difficult than in the past, but creates a superior arrow shaft to those produced in the past.

All this means that the manufacturer is now attempting to bond two materials together that have not been bonded previously. This is unique plastic like materials that make up the composition of the Duravanes and that of the filament woven carbon fiber of the PSE TAC15 arrow shafts.

Please keep in mind that when an arrow manufacture buys materials to produce arrows, they are buying in huge bulk quantity. This includes glue as well as the other components, so it takes a while before they can replace these things and replace them with others.

In simplest terms, we all want our arrows to work well and hold up, but in archery arrow maintenance seems to be a way of life and it's probably a good idea to get a fletching jig to replace lost or torn vanes. Super 91 has already stated that he's been having good luck with Dorn's glue and I am certain we will need some time and everybody's help to test out some different glues until we find what works the best over a several month span of time.

Please just make sure that before you re-bond any vanes onto these shafts that you clean down the shafts very well with denatured alcohol on a cloth. A little goes a long way, so all you need do is wet the cloth and wipe several shafts down by wrapping the wet cloth around the shafts and sliding it back and forth a couple times. Let the shaft dry standing up for 10 - 15 minutes and you are ready to place your arrows in the fletching jig and start gluing your vanes back on.

Nothing says that you need to use an instant drying glue. You can always use slower setting glues like "Fletch Tite Cement" or "Duco Cement", then there's "5 Minute Epoxy" and to many others to even begin to mention here.

If all else fails, you may want to even try using natural feathers instead of vanes. Natural feathers weigh 4x less than vanes, are more wind resistant, but will require more care since they are not as tough. Each time you change the materials being bonded together, you are likely to encounter different results.

Once again, let's give credit where it's due; Super 91 does more experimenting with many of these variable than the rest of us put together, so if you're not inclined to do any experimenting yourself, I would recommend following his lead on what to use, since he has documented more than anybody else I'm aware of.

Regards,

Jon
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-13-2011, 09:15 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 391
Re: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information

Hi Konrad,
Excellent point and thanks for taking the time to provide a really good explanation on Third Axis and the steps that can be used to adjust it.

This is an extremely important tuning element that should never be overlooked by any archer or shooter.

Keep the good stuff coming, we need all we can get!!!!!!!!

Regards,

Jon
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-13-2011, 10:10 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North West Washington
Posts: 80
Re: TAC 15/15i Broadhead Accuracy Tips


When firing a crossbow of any type, the arrow will oscillate from right-to-left (horizontally) as it exits the bow.

Upon firing, the arrow does not begin rotation for some 5 to 10 feet and during which time (remember the oscillation is still going on), the blades of your broadhead will “catch” the air and direct the front of the shaft in one direction or another.

Then the fletching begins rotation and shaft stabilization but the shaft is already flying in the wrong direction. It may only be a fraction of a degree but enough to cause a change in point of impact as compared with field points. Field points do not tend to catch air.

The idea is to minimize blade air deflection and give the fletching a chance to provide stabilization.

The primary blades of your broadhead should be set so they are parallel with the ground.

If you are using a four blade head with all blades of equal dimensions, orient one set vertical and one set horizontally. If using a three blade head, place one blade to the right or the left. Regardless all broadhead blades should set the same.

All of this discussion also points to the importance of the arrow being pushed straight up the center during the shot (tuning/center shot).
Also remember that the center of the riser is not necessarily where the bow is applying the most force.
Many times experimentation is the only way to find this true center of pressure (i.e. paper tuning).
__________________
“The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter can not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.”

Col. Jeff Cooper
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: TAC 15/15i Basic Unpublished Information
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need some basic cleaning advice. deermaster The Basics, Starting Out 4 01-11-2011 11:35 PM
Basic Gunsmithing that you can do J E Custom Gunsmithing 9 11-22-2008 06:26 PM
CZ 513 basic britz Rimfire and Airguns 3 06-27-2007 08:32 PM
Reloading die micrometer or basic? 270yotekiller Reloading 1 10-24-2005 03:24 PM
Basic reload question KRob Reloading 19 05-26-2005 03:08 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC