Angle Shooting

By Len Backus, Dec 31, 1969 | |
  1. Len Backus
    Below, referencing a .300 Remington Ultra Mag, utilizing a flat shooting 180 grain Nosler Partition bullet, with a velocity of 3250 feet per second, the uncorrected for gravity distance of 500 yards to target would cause the bullet’s point of impact (under the field expedient method) to hit approximately 13.2 inches high; or 1.75 minute of angle. Please see the Night Force ballistic Targeting Software Generated Angle Drop chart below.

    [​IMG]

    To the average hunter, these trajectories, at first, may not appear to be significant, but as an experienced shooter you know that they are; and the angle that you will be holding on demands a correction. As an example, let’s say that your rifle shoots an average group size of one inch at 100 yards (large for a pro-grade rifle). At three hundred yards the group size could hypothetically open to three inches; at five hundred yards, five inches. So, if you are going to be thirteen inches high at 500 yards if uncorrected for gravity, then you can add an additional five inches to that, in any direction. This is not difficult to see; math is math and science is science and when the math is done correctly, one round will put one animal down.

    [​IMG] Figure 3 – Angle Drop Table for the 300 Rem Ultra Mag

    The U.S. Military as well as other Government agencies, train all of their Precision Marksmen on how to obtain the corrected for gravity distance to target. The original method of approach was to utilize a Protractor, string and paper-clip. The string was tied to the center of the protractor and weighted with the paper-clip. When the Marksman was aiming at his target, the protractor was held in place with the weighted string along the side of the receiver inline with the barrel. The Marksmen would then carefully grab the protractor and string, and obtain the angle that he was holding on. Then, the Marksman would go to his data book and obtain the cosine number, then do the math; very simple and very straight forward. Only today there is an easier, faster and more dependable method of obtaining the cosine number; and that is by using an “Angle Cosine Indicator” manufactured by “Sniper Tools Design Company.”

    [floatright][​IMG][/floatright]The Angle Cosine Indicator, (ACI), is a widely accepted method of obtaining the cosine number of the angle that the hunter is holding on, by all Branches of the U.S. Military and militaries throughout the world. It is a simple tool for hunters who hunt in mountainous terrain and is a vault solid precision instrument. It is manufactured from aircraft grade aluminum and anodized a flat black color. It fastens onto your rifle or your scope; either by a standard Weaver Base scope ring, or as seen in figure 4, by “Badger Ordnance’s” military specific picantinny rail mount. When the rifle is held on target, the “ACI” indicates the cosine number of that angle by means of a highly visible index mark; in addition, the cosine numbers transverse the body in five degree increments. The ACI is easily zeroed to your rifles bore by simply loosening the side screw and rotating the body until the zero cosine number sits inline of the index mark.

    <Previous | Home | Next Page >

    Share This Article

Comments

To make a comment simply sign up and become a member!